Category Archives: PublicLibrary

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Libraries as Safe Spaces

Who remembers the role that public libraries played in bringing neighbors together?

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us now, and to come and work together, for all of us?

I believe that attention to shared histories of times when a certain library in DC helped, may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, in my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

” …Carnegie Public Library. Some working class neighborhoods, such as the SW neighborhood where Al Jolson learned the speaking style he would later play on
stage, allowed limited mixing. The annual Easter Monday Egg Rolling contest was, however, the only officially non-segregated social event in the city for many years. Despite this, or because of it, Washington, DC was eventually
declared the most segregated city in the Union. That artificial separation of groups and classes of people, with its attendant humiliation and ambiguity for both Negroes and Jews, was shown for the disruptive force it was meant to be, and broken down in two places: the lone institution of learning where all could meet and see past their differences, and the largest market in the city, where all could meet and see their common needs for food, and other goods, as human beings.

At the turn of the century, both communities developed similar ways of evading White discrimination. Both communities built their own institutions, and both sometimes had assimilation attempts. The Jewish community took refuge in its own institutions, from the synagogues to the YMHA near 11th and
Pennsylvania Ave, NW.

Comparable institutions in the African-American
community included churches and the 12th Street YMCA, also known as the Anthony Bowen YMCA, after a prominent free man of color who was a…

 

Page 17″

So, it turns out that I might have needed to explain a bit more about the levels of segregation in the city, on this page.  Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page sixteen was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on shared community spaces, like libraries?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC,  Vote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book):

 

Peace     ! שָׁלוֹם

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and

Babylon 5 review posts (online, offline: B5EpsThr15), and

Baby Acres: a Vision of a Better World (posts listed at bottom of page…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Colors??

Who was considered to be “Colored” and who was considered to be “White” when these things made nearly (and often literally) a life and death difference, and who decided?  That was a complex question, but there was never a question of where both groups stood.  The Reconstruction benefited both, as did working together.

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us now, and to respond to work together, for all of us?

I believe that attention to shared histories of times when we grew a bit more free from discrimination may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, in my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

Chapter 2: Before Jews Were White: Black-Jewish
alliances in DC Before 1948


Image: Carnegie Library and Central Market
-Carnegie Library

 

Much attention has been paid to the alliance between the Black and Jewish communities as a twentieth century phenomenon, but this alliance was born long before the Holocaust.   Between the Civil War and the end of the Reconstruction, the Federal City was relatively desegregated and offered some freedom of movement for people of color, but as the 1880 ́s progressed, those
freedoms were eroded.


By the turn of the century, the city was firmly
segregated, negatively affecting both Jews and African-Americans.

With small and informal exception, the only places where citizens of differing races might mingle freely on any regular basis were Central Market, now roughly located where Archives is, at 7th and Pennsylvania Ave, NW, and the never-segregated ….

 

Page 16″

So, it turns out that I might have needed to explain a bit more about the different periods of cooperation, and that shared color line mentioned on this page.  Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page fifteen was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on shared adversity as a mandate for cooperation?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC,  Vote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book):

 

Peace     ! שָׁלוֹם

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and

Babylon 5 review posts, and

Baby Acres: a Vision of a Better World (posts listed at bottom of page…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Day 24 of High School in Five Months, voting, and libraries

Citizenship responsibilities, like voting, require a combination of both knowledge of the candidates, and of the tools, like Ranked Choice Voting, that give us ways to make our voices heard.  Libraries put more tools into the hands of citizens, empowering better decision-making.  Those tools, like RCV and critical thinking, are some of the tools that any democracy movement needs:

start of Week 7…

Day 24 Lesson Plan

Grammar: Essay Writing practice

-Finish your Thesis Sentence, general Essay Outline, and detailed Intro. Paragraph Outline

Negative Exponents: Intro. practice activity
Day 24, Week 7 Exit Slips
(Day 23Day 25)

Action Items:

1.) Where can you find information about voting, besides the local Public Library?

2.) Share your  findings with us, and

3.) Write a book, story, blog post or tweet that uses those findings, and then, please tell us about it! If you write a book, once it is published please consider donating a copy to your local public library.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GR button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC,

Vote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book)

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.

and my Babylon 5 review posts, if you like Science Fiction,
and
a proposed Vision on Wondering Wednesdays: for a kinder world…
   

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil

our year 2020 CE =  12020 HE

(Day 1Day 5)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free copies at: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

Language Learning, Local Education, and 4 Inexpensive Ideas

Spanish has always been my favorite language, especially after moving to the bilingual South West. Technically, I was hired for my experience in Unix which led to my MAT in mathematics, but on the ground, my love of learning languages proved to be more important in the classroom. As an adult education instructor at the Continuing Education division of the San Diego Community College District, my fluency proved helpful for many of my students, and also, of course, the ESL classes help our students from many nations contribute in the USA.

Every local educational institution has room for improvement, particularly when seen from both faculty and student perspectives. I posed some questions recently about ideas for implementing low-cost projects that would have been helpful to our students when I taught in North campus involving

1.) a small library or study area,
2.) workshops by CA Promise Program graduates,
3.) an on-site nurse paid for by medi-Cal, and
4.) access to public transportation:

1.) Many of my students told me they didn’t have a quiet place to study.  While I know that space is in very short supply on the North campus, I wonder if a small area, possibly in the multipurpose room when it’s not being used, could be set aside with cubicles or movable small desks and a small movable lending library like the tiny libraries?

2.)   I wonder, on the assumption of course that having graduated and started a new career as a professional with a bachelor’s degree anyone can be found who will have time, if any students having graduated with a bachelor’s degree after getting their first two years of community college paid for through the California promise program or with the San Diego promise program, could be persuaded to come back either as tutors, mentors, or even just to give workshops in the areas in which they got their educations?  Particularly accounting majors or paralegal/pre-law majors who could give small workshops on dealing with debt in California including, California statutes of limitations, or financial planning workshops or how to do your own taxes if you only need to do the 1040EZ, etc?  One-on-one tutoring, and also mentoring,  that supportive help, especially for our high school equivalency students, could be both useful and inspiring.  Seeing successfully graduated professionals with a bachelor’s degree who came through the community college system and are willing to spend individual time with them, even if only a couple of hours a week, could make a difference.  Could interns or SCORE volunteers put a program like this together?  Do we track or stay in touch with students who finish the California or San Diego promise program once they finish their bachelor’s degrees?

3.) Many of my students worked two jobs or for other reasons never had time to see a doctor even when they were ill. I wonder if it is possible to pay, through the Medi-Cal system, for a nurse to be on-site, perhaps based out of the office  of each campus, a couple of days/evenings a week?

4.)  One of the biggest problem areas that I saw for my car-free students was that neither the Continuing Education division, nor the CE faculty Union was able to get the transit authority to enforce acceptance of CE student IDs for the monthly bus and rail pass discount.  In planning for post-#Covid-19 classes, will we have any resources to address public transportation discount and access issues?

I imagine that some of these ideas may be a little overwhelming, because I understand that time and resources are extremely limited, but once in a while, as Dr. Rivera-Lacey noted: we do have to dream.

Please share your ideas for improving local education, or for supporting any other parts of our critical Public Domain Social Infrastructure!

Action Items:

1.) Consider some ideas you may have on how having these ideas implemented could help your local community,

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please, and

3.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at LEAST for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC,

Vote, Teach and Learn (PDF Lesson Plan Book)!

and
my Babylon 5 review posts, if you like Science Fiction,
and
a proposed Vision on Wondering Wednesdays: for a kinder world…

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil

our year 2020 CE =  12020 HE

(Day 1Day 5)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free copies at: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

Wondering Wednesdays, Baby Acres, Chapter 1, part 1B: Cultural Change

This post continues the rough draft of  Chapter 1 of my non-fiction WiP, Baby Acres.  This is the next outline section, chapter 1, section IB.

I am posting the 392 words, which was meant to be 250 words, for this section along with some thoughts on the overall chapter outlining process for the book as a whole.

Again, as previously stated, the overall goal is now to explain why we need both equ. + justice, & why in 4 phases.  This chapter will transition to a chapter (2-5) for each phase, showing what Phases I-IV could look like as part of a possible roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us.  This vision is laid out in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met, without taking anything from anyone, and without violence, intimidation, nor coercion of any kind. 

Chapter One, section IB:

Phase II with respect to Phase I and to the entire project:

(section IA was last week…)

IB:

Phase II will be about moving our societal culture from one of corrosively assigning blame to cooperatively solving problems. Phase I must set the stage for such cultural change by putting enough of the shared infrastructure in place to allow the breathing room for that  cultural change to begin. Then, those cultural changes can make the space needed to allow  further progress in our society that will facilitate and drive the desperately needed increasing global cooperation moving forward.

First, the building up of our PublicDomainInfrastrcture leads to a growing Each One Teach One mindset, through on-going adult learning. Normalization of constant adult learning will inevitably show the gaps in public education, and thus the need for better educational foundations in several areas. In particular, the pre-requisite knowledge requirements for the Adulthood Rite of Passage Challenge already point up the lack that many adults face in legal, financial, and emotional, not to mention physical, self defense techniques. Those needs, in an environment of increasing access to free community safe spaces and on-going legal and financial education, can in turn help push for better access to the Commons for all, and a growing sense  of public service and solidarity. Better libraries, health care, transit and education across all communities in the United States could then also begin to build, as Phase II progresses and more adults step up to the Each One Teach One challenge, an increasing thirst to help improve other communities outside of our country as well. Yet, we have much to do first, to clean up our own house.

As the infrastructure building work of Phase I begins to solidify into solid educational benefits during Phase II, both freedom of speech and freedom of association begin to widen, as fear of lack of accessibility starts to loosen its grip. As learning spreads, for instance, regarding state Statutes of Limitations on medical debt, for instance, fewer people will suffer the fear of harassment or default judgments from predatory debt collectors. As more upper and middle class citizens use public transportation, greater safety and reliability of access to places of learning and public gathering can encourage curiosity and cooperative ventures. Chapter 3 will show what Phase II’s increasingly cooperative learning could look like in greater detail, while Chapter 8 will lay out some steps for how we might get there from Phase I.

.

— (Next section: Chapter 1, IC…)

I’m continuing to update the outline for chapter 6, and finally figured out what was nagging me about that chapter, and the 4 chapters to follow it: Metrics!!  I need metrics, some way to measure progress, to mark the goal for each phase, and to figure out how to answer the question “Are We There, Yet?” -and I’ll clearly have to do a better, more cooperative job than I did when I created the metrics (methodology) for my thesis

Last week was the eighth installment of this series…

 

Action Items:

1.) Consider some ideas you may have on how having really good shared infrastructure (Libraries, Mass Transit, free legal and financial workshops, and Health Care) could help society move forward in 15 years,

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please, and

3.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at LEAST for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC,

Vote, Teach and Learn (PDF Lesson Plan Book)

and
my Babylon 5 review posts, if you like Science Fiction,
and
a proposed Vision on Wondering Wednesdays: for a kinder world…
   

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil

our year 2020 CE =  12020 HE

(Day 1Day 5)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free copies at: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

Day 17 of High School in 5 months, Djinn Gold, and InterLibrary Loan

The Djinni’s Offer:  (below…)

Day 17 of 67, Lesson Plan

Caps, Part 2 online worksheet

Finish Filling in Yourself: Multiplication Tables for Perfect Squares Diagonal

Khan Academy continuing Exponents online worksheet

Day 17 ExitSlips

(And an easy review of yesterday’s introduction to exponents…)

In our Learning Toolbox:
San Diego Public Library system  (was there a public library in 1838?)
(1. ordering books, 2. InterLibrary Loan, 3. Reference Librarians)

With a classmate, work together for 7 minutes to take a crack at:

The Djinni’s Offer:

“After opening an ancient bottle you find on the beach, a Djinni
appears. In payment for his freedom, he gives you a choice of either
50,000 gold coins or one magical gold coin. The magic coin will turn
into two gold coins on the first day. The two coins will turn into four
coins total at the end of two days. By the end or the third day there will
be eight gold coins total. The Djinni explains that the magic coins will
continue this pattern of doubling each day for one moon cycle, 28
days. Which prize do you choose?
When you have made your choice, answer these questions:
 The number of coins on the third day will be 2×2×2. Can you write
another expression using exponents for the number of coins there will be on the third day?
 Write an expression for the number of coins there will be on the
28th day. Is this more or less than a million coins?”
(from: https://www.illustrativemathematics.org/content-standards/tasks/532)
.

(Day 16Day 18)

Action Items in support of literacy (and Gold!) that you can take right now:

1.) Download some public domain version of a classic story about djinn,

2.) Bet a week’s worth of dish-washing with some friends that you’ll have more gold after 30 days than they could ask for in one lump sum from the tricky Djinni!

3.) Share how the bet went: who’s washing dishes?

4.) Write a novel that references a classic book, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Other ideas welcome on how to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail, starting with improving these four parts of our good #PublicDomainInfrastructure:

1. #libraries,

2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,

3. #UniversalHealthCare, and

4. good #publictransport

Read, Write, Vote, Teach and Learn (PDF Lesson Plan Book),

 and my Babylon 5 review posts, if you like Science Fiction,

and a proposed Vision on Wondering Wednesdays: for a kinder world…    

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil

our year 2020 CE =  12020 HE

(Day 1Day 5)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free copies at: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

Wondering Wednesdays, Baby Acres, Chapter 1, part 1

This post continues the rough draft of  Chapter 1 of my non-fiction WiP, Baby Acres.  And it now has words!  🙂     I’m posting the first outline section, chapter 1, section IA, warts and all, so please be forgiving here, dear readers.  At the moment it is the best I can do.  This was only meant to be about 250-300 words, but I got a little, well, verbose, at 580 words, I guess.

I’ve also realized, or remembered, rather, from my thesis writing, that putting the outline up front and then the verbage, or writing the words, later, is a mess.   It is easier than having a separate spreadsheet for the outline and wordcount (though that process does work better for me when I am writing a novel, perhaps because there are so many more threads to keep track of, and also because I often struggle to hit my initial wordcounts while drafting fiction, so that wordcount tracking in my novel WiP spreadsheet keeps me moving it along, while adherring to potential publisher genre wordcount requirements).

Too bad my current free word processing software is too “light” to expand an outline and recollapse it again by chapter.  So I am doing this all manually.

As previously stated, the overall goal is now to explain why we need both equ. + justice, & why in 4 phases.  This chapter will transition to a chapter (2-5) for each phase, showing what Phases I-IV could look like as part of a possible roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us.  This vision is laid out in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met, without taking anything from anyone, and without violence, intimidation, nor coercion of any kind. 

Chapter One, section IA:

Phase I with respect to the entire project, and phases II-IV:

The first stage of this project forms the foundation for all three remaining stages. Phase I
consists of showing the connections between four key parts of our infrastructure, and building enough support for those systems as part of our larger sphere/culture/system/xyzWorld. A lack of health care, public transportation, up-to-date information, and safe community gathering spaces places limits on the freedom of us all. Accessible and safe community information-finding spaces are equally important, and public libraries frequently act as both gathering spaces for community events, and a point of first contact for many members of the most vulnerable communities to find up to date information on health events, voting, and other critical issues.

Both a single payer health care system and good public transit are key to free speech and
association. Lack of guaranteed transportation puts a practical limit on what a person can say due to lack of ability to protect one’s health, since having no car makes trips to doctor’s offices more difficult, or even impossible. Lack of health care and independent transportation can also put the job of a vulnerable worker at risk, leading to fear of job loss or black-listing, based on guilt by association. Those fears can quite effectively limit both freedom of association and freedom of worship, for instance when attending mosque is equated with associating with
terrorists. This underscores the importance of having access to good information, since

“a little knowledge is dangerous.”

currently page 11…

 

Both public transportation and public health care are also interconnected to consumer debt education and public libraries. Lack of current and accurate information on debt laws at the state level, for example, leads to many default judgments on debts which were already time-barred. These default SoL judgments are often strongly skewed toward poorer zip codes

(find blog posts with MD and other state studies…) .

This lack of continuing legal financial education tilts the scales toward further unjust and also unsustainable economic distribution. Public libraries are one key place where up to date information on such critical financial and pub health and safety issues is accessible to even the most vulnerable members of society. These four systems are thus inseparably linked and needed before progress on any other part of society could advance. Together they are called PublicDomainInfrastructure, and their connection to the larger whole will be shown in chapter two.

The higher levels of both empathy and critical thinking skills needed to build support for
PublicDomainInfrastructure can be supported in various ways.

Reaching the 4 Freedoms will require climbing a fairly steep learning curve for many people, and the process of learning both sets of skills could be significantly aided by encouraging people from all walks of life both to learn two or three (hinted at in ch.2, developed in chptr 3) languages, and to travel, when possible.

Travel is also especially helpful to this learning process, but is far less accessible to the majority of people than language learning, which can be done for free online, when one is persistent enough. Language learning is an inexpensive tool for building empathy, as travel could also be, if we were imaginative enough.

Public libraries can help in that task, as well as in learning how to build a habit of continual
individual learning and even group research. Many libraries have multi-lingual staffs, and
reference librarians trained in finding information from around the world. So, they are well-
placed to encourage more on-going individual and community learning in a variety of ways.

— (Next section: Chapter 1, IB…)

I’m continuing to update the outline for the first chapter, and also, I revise old versions of the all of the chapter outlines as I go.  I like to save my work each day as a PDF (doc has been updated with “, and to travel, when possible”…), in addition to backing up the rtf document.  That way I have a snapshot for each stage of the work, and I can also use any editor I want to edit the file, in case of crashes.

(Btw, I must remember to ask JYP about acks, since anon. blog…)

Last week was the seventh installment of this series…

 

Action Items:

1.) Consider some ideas you may have on how having safe and far-reaching public transit, universal health care, free local legal and financial classes, and great libraries could society change in 15 years,

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please, and

3.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at LEAST for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button:

Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC,

 

Vote, Teach and Learn (PDF Lesson Plan Book)

and
my Babylon 5 review posts, if you like Science Fiction,
and
a proposed Vision on Wondering Wednesdays: for a kinder world…
   

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil

our year 2020 CE =  12020 HE

(Day 1Day 5)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free copies at: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

Day 11 of High School in Five Months, Perspectives, and libraries

Books, film, and other forms of media, like comic books, aka graphic novels, and music can all help us see the world from a new perspective.   Books and other works that are in the public domain are made accessible by volunteer libraries, like the one compiled by LibriVox, or Project Gutenberg.   Libraries of various kinds are one of the key parts of our democracy, and therefore, of Phase I of the Four Freedoms movement :

 

Day 11 Lesson Plan
Khan Academy practice activity on intensifiers and adverbs of degree
Khan Academy Subject-Verb agreement if you need more practice
optional Khan Academy reading: Perspectives (Hunters vs. Farmers)

Khan Academy activity on Dividing by 10, 100, 1000

Day11 ExitSlips

Action Items:

1.) Download some public domain version of a classic book, or grab your favorite version of the The Arabian Nights (yes, I know: the 1001 Nights was by Frenchman Antoine Galland, who made up a few stories and inserted them into older Arabic and Persian stories that may have come from India, but still…) or any other story, in an original language, if possible! 

2.) Read a page,

3.) Share your thoughts on that page

4.) Write a book, story, blog post or tweet that uses those thoughts, and please tell us about it! If you write a book, once it is published please consider donating a copy to your local public library.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GR button:Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book…)!

 

Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

the Gregorian year, 2021 CE = the Human year 12021 HE

(Day 10Day 12)

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Day 10 of GED in 5 months, more salty evidence, and librarians!

So, if salt is so important, then how would you find evidence that salt is important?   For that matter, how would you find evidence that the Crusades really happened?  Ask your favorite reference librarian, perhaps, at your local public library branch?  One of the key parts of our democracy, and of Phase I of the Four Freedoms movement is libraries, right?

 

Day 10 Lesson Plan
Grammar activity (fewer vs. less):
Khan Academy activity: Order of Operations
powers of 10
Day 10 ExitSlips

Action Items:

1.) Why is salt important, and how do we know this?

2.) Was salt involved in the Crusades?

3.) Share your thoughts on whether trade and resources, or the lack thereof, could have influenced wars.

4.) Write a book, story, blog post or tweet that uses those thoughts, and please tell us about it! If you write a book, once it is published please consider donating a copy to your local public library.

(Day 9Day 11)

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GR button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!, Teach and Learn (PDF Lesson Plan Book)

and

my Babylon 5 review posts, if you like Science Fiction,

and

a proposed Vision on Wondering Wednesdays: for a kinder world…    

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil

our year 2020 CE =  12020 HE

(Day 1Day 5)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free copies at: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

 

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Transportation for “contraband” people?

Libraries and buses are also an intimately connected and crucial part of a community health care network, for many of us.  

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, and to give more money for mass transit as part of Public Health Care?

I believe that attention to shared and connected community institutions and systems, like Public Transportation and Public Health Care, may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, on page eleven of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

“… observant Jews?  They were barely accepted themselves in this Southern city,
where the community felt obliged to petition for permission to purchase a house
of worship, despite the existence of St. John ́s and other prominent Christian
houses of worship. What fear and guilt may have gone through the minds of
those hearing the words of Parashat Ki Tetzei, Deuteronomy 23:16,
commanding that a slave running away from a harsh master must be allowed to
live wherever he wished, and not oppressed? Here in Washington, DC, the
compensated emancipation, which conditionally freed slaves nine months
before the Emancipation Proclamation, left many slaves waiting for freedom,
continuing to hope for a Moses of their own, as Harriet Tubman was sometimes
called. The well known comparison actually went both ways, as Negro slaves
identified with the plight of the Hebrews enslaved in Egypt, and many Jewish
families in Mississippi and other areas of the South controlled by General Grant
́s troops experienced a homelessness similar to their recently enslaved
contemporaries.

   Runaway slaves crossing Union lines were known as
contrabands, considered to be confiscated contraband property of war.   While
Jews were being expelled from their homes in areas occupied by General Grant’s troops, people of color like Harriet and Louisa Jacobs in the Federal City and
surrounding areas, worked to inspire hope and provide housing for the many
contrabands pouring in to the Capital from the South, an ironic twist of fate in
the history of these two oppressed peoples.

History was not all they shared.

 

Page 11″

So, it turns out that page 10 might have done better with this image toward the bottom, even if it is early in the first chapter?  The Fugitive Slave Act is mentioned on that page, but the consequences are on this page (page 11).

Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page ten was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on the function of trains and buses as part of the community health care system?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book):

 

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

April, 2021 CE = April 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and

Babylon 5 review posts, and

Baby Acres: a Vision of a Better World (posts listed at bottom of page…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.