Tag Archives: hebrew

Nested Holidays, Counting, and Online Libraries for Empathy

The common good, and access to all sorts of FREE libraries, must become more fully inclusive for all of us.  Below, one volunteer-driven online library provides free access to many diverse Jewish texts and teachings, this one centered on two current holidays.

My update for  April 12022/5782, with my own Nested Themes for each day of the Omer:

  1. Empathy and health care as the first night of #counting the harvest, first week: empathy, of seven weeks of growing…
  2. Tonight, the second night of harvest #counting: #empathy and #housing for all…
  3. On this third day of harvest #counting, #empathy and accessible, affordable, and safe train #transport for all…
  4. Counting this fourth harvest day of working to Do Better for #empathy and #hope. We can end poverty, we can end homelessness, and we can Do Better.   …   Empathy, and hope for Ending Poverty via Free Consumer and Debt Related Legal Education (as opposed to hope in having hope, itself, which is akin to faith in hope…).
  5. #Counting this fifth harvest day for #empathy and public #libraries as tools for building safe homes and community for all.
  6. Counting for #empathy and hope in hope itself, on this sixth day of harvest for human kindness.  (l’empatie et l’espoir sont l’espoir pour nous tous…)
  7.    Day 7x of the Omer, will be (tomorrow starting tonight…) Empathy within Empathy … End of 1st week, Empathy, of Counting the Omer, 5782
     Well, this year I missed day Nine, (day 8 being the start of the 2nd Week, the Week of Health Care, and the day of Housing in Health Care as related concerns), so I’ll continue with this new schema omerList  next year, in 5783…

The second night of Passover  begins a sacred countdown that has long fascinated and frustrated me: fascinating because there is a meaning to each day of this countdown that is often forgotten about, and frustrating because this countdown is also often not completed “correctly” by many of us, leading to a near obsession with the count.  It’s called the Counting of The Omer, and it is a 7 by 7 perfect square.  That already, was enough to get my attention years ago, when I first converted to Judaism, but upon learning some years later that there was a mystical meaning that did not involve too much mystical hoo-ha, that added even more beauty to this perfect square, and so I had to learn more.

Each week has a theme of it’s own, as with this first week: Chesed, or mercy.  Then each day of each week has a theme, also, thus giving each day a theme within a theme.  This first day (starting tonight, the 2nd night of Passover, with the 2nd seder) is Chesed within Chesed, and so is purely focused on that quality of mercy (sorry, fellow Babylon 5 fans, I just couldn’t help it!).  Each successive day will have a new focus, which you can see for yourself on this very cool graphic (note that delightful diagonal of solid-colored dots beautifying this mitzvah of learning!!) at the free online library of the Open Siddur Project.   Ok, so it’s not exactly a nested loop, but close enough, with the Counting of the Omer almost sort of one long holiday that takes place within Passover, but continues for 49 days, until the very night of Shavuot, or The Geeks Holiday (!), as I like to call it, and my favorite holiday on the calendar!  🙂

Chag Sameach!

Actions To Help:

1.) Share two different sources related to the Omer.

2.) Share your thoughts on how a calendar based on empathetic ideas might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking,

3.) Write a Book, story, blog post, or tweet that uses it.

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Click here to read, if you like:

B5, La Casa De Papel/Money Heist, & Lupin & Hakan: Muhafiz/The Protector Reviews

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Parashat P’kudei, and Dwelling on Roots (of words…)

      Parashat  Pekudei is the 23rd in the annual cycle, and the 11th and final parashah in the book of Sh’mot/Exodus.  Normally, this parashah is doubled up  with Parashat VaYak’hel.  This year is a Leap Year on the Hebrew calendar, so these two parshiot are read separately.

      This week, we are often told, the Sh’chinah, usually translated as Divine presence, goes to live in the Mish’kan, aka the Tabernacle, or the Dwelling Place of  the Divine.

But I noticed something:  The parashah starts off at 38:21

  (after the initial v21:

אֵ֣לֶּה פְקוּדֵ֤י הַמִּשְׁכָּן֙ מִשְׁכַּ֣ן הָעֵדֻ֔ת אֲשֶׁ֥ר פֻּקַּ֖ד עַל־פִּ֣י מֹשֶׁ֑ה עֲבֹדַת֙ הַלְוִיִּ֔ם בְּיַד֙ אִֽיתָמָ֔ר בֶּֽן־אַהֲרֹ֖ן הַכֹּהֵֽן׃  -“These are the records of the Mishkan, The Mish’kan of Witness which were recorded from the mouth of Moshe, the work of the Leviim, at the hand of Itamar ben Aaron the Priest.” 

(my translation, using “p-k-d” as “records” via JPS translation, as I do not recall that shoresh/root -Shira) )

  with the words

    “… הַמִּשְׁכָּן֙ מִשְׁכַּ֣ן הָעֵדֻ֔ת  ”  

The Mish’kan, The mishkan of Witness…

   and that root (shoresh) for Mishkan is the same as שְׁכָּֽן

  Oops: unfortunately, this week’s parashah uses the word C’VoD, not the word used in Solomon’s temple, for presence:  

“כְב֣וֹד יְהֹוָ֔ה מָלֵ֖א אֶת־הַמִּשְׁכָּֽן׃…”

  •   -“…glory/”presence,” in this case, but normally translated glory/honor of Y/HVH filled the Mish’kan.”

  But what I was thinking of was the root of the word               מִּשְׁכָּֽן

   and of the word                                                                                  שכינה

     Same root,  שכנ from “to dwell”.   I am surprised that this is not, however the word used in Solomon’s temple, where we are often told that the  שכינה (Sh’chinah) Divine Presence filled the temple after his dedicatory prayer.

   Linguistic aside:  I love that word S(h) K(h) N / שְׁכָּֽן

because it is, according to Strong’s concordance, related to the Semitic root S-K-N, and the Arabic SaKiN, which you can still hear in the Turkish phrase Sâkin ol (calm down).  It’s a beautiful borrowed word that stretches out that first syllable, and is given away by the “ol” after sâkin: frequently, words with “ol” or “et/mek” after them are borrowed into the Ottoman (and thus into Modern Turkish) from either Persian or Arabic.  This relation to relaxing and calm with a dwelling place makes perfect sense, as we should all be able to live in a relaxing dwelling place.

      Oops

      Pity, that, because I was all set to claim the Divine Presence in both places, the Mish’kan/Tabernacle, and King Solomon’s temple, as ways of dwelling among us human beings, thus relating back to having a place in which to dwell, which each of us human beings also needs.  But, alas, the word play does not work, because the word that we keep using in English for Dwelling or Presence of the Divine, as Shechinah, is not actually the word that is used in the T’NaCh, unfortunately.  It says, at King Solomon’s dedication of the (1st) Temple, that

וַיְהִ֕י בְּצֵ֥את הַכֹּהֲנִ֖ים מִן־הַקֹּ֑דֶשׁ וְהֶעָנָ֥ן מָלֵ֖א אֶת־בֵּ֥ית יְהֹוָֽה׃

&

   v. 11: “וְלֹא־יָכְל֧וּ הַכֹּהֲנִ֛ים לַֽעֲמֹ֥ד לְשָׁרֵ֖ת מִפְּנֵ֣י הֶעָנָ֑ן כִּֽי־מָלֵ֥א כְבוֹד־יְהֹוָ֖ה אֶת־בֵּ֥ית יְהֹוָֽה׃ {פ}

  •  -“And when the Cohanim left the Holy/Sanctuary, the cloud filled the House of Y/HVH.”
  • &
  • v. 11:  -“And the Cohanim couldn’t stand to serve before the Cloud because the Glory of Y/HVH had filled the House of Y/HVH.”

   There’s that word again:  “כְבוֹד”  …  “Glory/Honor”  -sigh.  This is very dissapointing, because I really wanted Wikipedia to be wrong, when it said that the world Shechinah does not actually appear in the T’NaCH (Jewish Bible: Torah, N’viim/Prophets, Chetuvim/writings).  Alas, I have searched, and lo, the words used are not related at all to ShChN, dwelling, but, to honor, and thick clouds.

  Ok, this must be a metaphor for “the world we live in.

…  So let’s start trying…”

to Do Better.

  • Please.

We can  Do Better.

-Shira   

 

    Parashat VaYaK’HeL was last week…

Action Prompts:

    Share your thoughts on how to build buy-in create a more equal, or at least less inequitable, society, please.   Writing, by the way, is my personal contribution to Project Do Better

What would yours be, if you had time?

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

B5, The Protector, Lupin, or $ Heist Reviews…

Holistic High School Lessons,

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BsCs

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Continue reading Parashat P’kudei, and Dwelling on Roots (of words…)

Truth, Reconciliation, and Reparations.

This is an old post not about Black History, specifically, but very much a part of our history:

Languages are not only made of the words that we speak, but also, and perhaps more importantly, they are made of the ways that we think, and languages also shape the ways that we think. From ways that grammar places action, object, and subject of a sentence, to ways that the articles and forms of negation which exist, or do not exist in a given language, accustom us to listening for different inflections, learning more than one family of languages teaches us that communication involves more than just words, it involves gestures. Some gestures, like tilting the head, are physical, and other gestures, like opening the hand, are both physical and spiritual. The spiritual gesture being made by one city hearkens back to the language of the Bible: Patach, tiftach… Open, you shall open (your hand)…

Ashville, NC, has voted to make a start toward reparations for slavery…

In the Abrahamic cultures of the western world, the entire basis of justice is contained in these reiterated verses of a book seen as foundational to many, and used as the basis of conversation between many people in the western world. These verses, the open hand always followed by the release from debt and servitude, say in the richest and plainest of language, that slaves are to be released not empty-handed, after seven years, but with sustenance. Now, one city is looking at how these values were overlooked for far longer than that. This gesture may not go far enough, but it is a very promising start, in terms of the needed assumption of responsibility for the systemic issues which continue to plague the Black community of the USA for the many years since “slavery ended” on paper, but not in fact.  May this step stir other cities, states, and nations to continue this process, and move all of us toward learning the languages of Mutual Respect, Truth, and Reconciliation.

*****************

Click here to read, if you like:

Science Fiction/Fantasy Shows,  Lupin, or Money Heist (soon)

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Parashat Terumah, and Home, Sweet Tabernacle?

     This week’s Torah portion is Parashat Terumah / פָּרָשַׁת תְּרוּמָה

       This is the 19th  annual  cycle parashah, and the 7th in the book of Sh’mot/Exodus:

Torah Portion: Exodus 25:1-27:19

      This week, everyone will hear about the “Mishkan” aka the Tabernacle.  But literally, miShoKhan (from the root of the word Shochen, or dwells), means “The Thing in which To Dwell” otherwise known as a house.  Ok, or just a home, or a shelter. 

    A place to live.

     So, if the Creator of the Universe needs a place to live, how much more, the rest of us, who need to eat, sleep, and breathe fresh air? 

Parashat Mishpatim was last week…

Action Prompts:

    Share your thoughts on how to build buy-in to keep (sorry, get & keep) all of us housed safely, please.   Writing, by the way, is my personal contribution to Project Do Better

What would yours be, if you had time?

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

Narrative and Prose Nonfiction,     

or Holistic High School Lessons,

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Continue reading Parashat Terumah, and Home, Sweet Tabernacle?

Parashat Mishpatim, “Na’aseh VeNishmah” as Do First and Buy-In Later, via Education?

     This week’s Torah portion is Parashat Mishpatim (פרשת מִשְׁפָּטִים),  the 6th in the book of Shemot/Exodus, and the 18th weekly Torah portion in the annual cycle.

      This week, traditional congregations (and maybe a few Masorti/Conservative Movement folks) will read of the inter-generational (in theory, or at least in Midrashic legend) acceptance of the Torah by all then-present and future members of the People Who Argue with G-d, both birth members and converts.   Mishpatim literally means judgements -and there are many spelled out in this week’s Torah portion.

      On the most fun holiday of the Jewish year, The Geek’s holiday, Shavuot/Pentacost, on  Tikkun Leil Shavuot (the night of Shavuot when we get to stay up all night long studying!!), I taught a class at the DC Beit Midrash.  The class was about a different parashah, but I referenced an important concept first found in this week’s parashah.  During that class, I defined the popular saying of

“Na’aseh ve Nishmah”

“We will do and We will listen up!/hear/learn/obey”

as having two crucial components.  The first component is  {Laws = formal rules; Minhagim/customs = informal norms}, and the second is inter-generational endurance.  Any society needs laws, and ways of interpreting, or policy, to apply those laws.  But a society also needs to have each new generation buy in to that law and those policies for that society to endure.  The way Torah gets this to happen is by teaching that each soul was present at that time, and accepted this Yoke upon ourselves.  This way, inter-generational buy-in is taught as a feature of the society, and each member of the society sees themselves as a part of that inter-generational contract.     social_contract_rousseau_page   

     So the contract, the rule of law, and the society, endures.  

     But how do we update that contract in such a way that we all give our buy-in to an equitable set of laws and policies which uphold those laws?  How do we then get buy-in from future generations to this contract, and thus into our society as a whole?

    How do you build a culture where everyone has access to the needed learning, and  the ability to safely opt in or out, of the social contract? 

 

Parashat Yitro was last week…

Action Prompts:

    Share your thoughts on how to build buy-in to keep all of us safer, please.   Writing, by the way, is my personal contribution to Project Do Better

What would yours be, if you had time?

(The handout for that class is here, in PDF format…)

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

Narrative and Prose Nonfiction,     

or Holistic High School Lessons,

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Continue reading Parashat Mishpatim, “Na’aseh VeNishmah” as Do First and Buy-In Later, via Education?

Parashat Yitro, and Laws, versus Policies

     This week’s Torah portion is  Parashat Yitro / פָּרָשַׁת יִתְרוֹ  Parashat Yitro is  17th in the annual cycle, covering: Exodus 18:1-20:23and the 5th in the book of Shemot/Exodus.

      This week, traditional congregations (and maybe a few Masorti/Conservative Movement folks) will read Yitro (Jethro)’s advice on organizing policy, and the Giving of The Law at Mt. Sinai.   So, this week, we read about the rule of law, and how to enact the details of that law through policy, as implemented on the advice of a wise planner.

    How do you build a culture where everyone has access to accurate and free legal learning, and  learns how to plan ahead like that?

    

Parashat Beshalach  was last week…

Action Prompts:

    Share your thoughts on how to craft better policy to keep all of us safer, please.   Writing, by thee way, is my personal contribution to Project Do Better.  What would yours be, if you had time?

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

Narrative and Prose Nonfiction,     

or Holistic High School Lessons,

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Continue reading Parashat Yitro, and Laws, versus Policies

Parashat BeShalach, and Bully Culture

     This week’s Torah portion, is “Parashat Beshalach / פָּרָשַׁת בְּשַׁלַּח   Parashat Beshalach is the 16th weekly Torah portion in the annual Jewish cycle of Torah reading.  Torah Portion: Exodus 13:17-17:16” 

      This week, traditional congregations (and maybe a few Masorti/Conservative Movement folks) will read the entire portion, and I forget which year of the Trienniel cycle the Reform and most of the Conservative/Masorti movements are in, so they might not get to that part this year.  But everyone will be reminded of the cowardly attacks by Amalek on the stragglers of the Children of Israel. 

    How do you build a culture where people would all be ashamed of themselves, as a certain giant I met in Bath ought to have been, for not “picking on someone your own size,” as we used to say.  Although frankly, picking on anyone for any reason, bigger than you or not, is really not ok.  Even if you are, as one co-worker I had used to say “in a battle of wits with an unarmed man.”  Bart Simpson can tell us what it felt like to be picked on intellectually, too, and that is also something for ‘smarter’ people to be ashamed of.  Rather than ridiculing the less informed, we should build them up.   That way, by the way, we are also providing uplift to ourselves, as well, no?

     How can we make the future more certain and safe and free for all of us, today?

   What do you think,   Thoughtful Readers?

Parashat Bo was last week…

Action Prompts:

1.)  Share your thoughts on how to keep all of us safer, please.   Writing is my personal contribution to Project Do Better.  What would yours be, if you had time?

2.)  Write a book, story, post or tweet that uses these thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for COVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport

Read, Write

-we can learn from the past via Stayed on Freedom’s Call,

                by Teaching and Learning (Lesson Plan list) in the present, to

                                               help build a kinder future, and Do Better Project for a Better World

( Golden 5 month GED lesson 22 of 67 plans),

   and  Babylon 5 review posts, from a Minbari Ranger’s perspective,

               and can historical fiction stories inspires learning and courage, Ann and Willow??

l’Shalom, Peace

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

Shira

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please let us know how you liked it.

Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


Continue reading Parashat BeShalach, and Bully Culture

Parashat Bo, and when Come really means Go

     This week’s Torah portion, “Parashat Bo / פָּרָשַׁת בֹּא”  is the 15th sedra (portion) in the annual Jewish cycle, and the third portion in the book of Exodus/Shemot.   The entire Torah Portion is: Exodus 10:1-13:16

      This week, traditional congregations (and maybe a few Masorti/Conservative Movement folks) will read the entire portion, from ‘the last three plagues on Egypt to the first Passover’ or, in the words of Zorba, “The full catastrophe.”   

       I was invited, when I lived in Izmir, to eat the first Seder with a family who chose to treat me as a man, handing me the walking stick with the bundle tied over it, as we used to picture Hobos carrying their things, ready to ride the rails, hopping trains during the Great Depression.  That impressed me deeply, both being respected as a man would be, for the second time in my life, while the women of the family watched us each pretend to walk down the path carrying a heavy burden, and the miming of the burden, itself.  This is not a custom I have seen any Ashkenazi families keep, so it was new to me.  It also made me think of my own ancestors, enslaved in the United States of America before the Civil War, and to wonder how many of them thought of this journey, and if they could make a similar journey to freedom.

     How can we make the future more certain and safe and free for all of us, today?

   What do you think,   Thoughtful Readers?

Parashat Vaera was last week…

Action Prompts:

1.)  Share your thoughts on how to keep all of us safer, please.   The invitation to all who are hungry, is it real?

2.)  Write a book, story, post or tweet that uses these thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for COVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport

Read, Write

-we can learn from the past Stayed on Freedom’s Call ,

                by Teaching and Learning (Lesson Plan list) in the present, to

                                               help build a kinder future, and Do Better Project for a Better World

( Golden 5 month GED lesson 22 of 67 plans),

   and  Babylon 5 review posts, from a Minbari Ranger’s perspective,

               and can historical fiction stories inspires learning and courage, Ann and Willow??

l’Shalom, Peace

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

Shira

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

  We’d love to hear from you here,  if you read it! 

🙂

 

Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


Continue reading Parashat Bo, and when Come really means Go

Parashat VaEra, and No Words

     This week’s Torah portion, “Parashat Vaera / פָּרָשַׁת וָאֵרָא, is the 14th weekly Torah portion in the annual Jewish cycle of Torah reading.   The entire Torah Portion is: Exodus 6:2-9:35

Parashat Vaera tells of the first seven Plagues of Egypt.”

     Dare I mention that there are some who make an interesting argument that many of these phenomena could be explained as part of the aftermath of the explosion of Santorini (or what became Santorini, after half of the initial island of Thera was blown away)?

   In any case, I’m with the One doing the rebuking: How can the angels rejoice at the deaths of their fellow creations?   Or am I getting a bit ahead of myself?

  How can we make the future more certain and safe for all of us?

   What do you think,   Thoughtful Readers?

 

Action Prompts:

1.)  Share your thoughts on how to keep all of us safer, please.

2.)  Write a book, story, post or tweet that uses these thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for COVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport

Read, Write

-we can learn from the past Stayed on Freedom’s Call for free,

                by Teaching and Learning (Lesson Plans offline) in the present, to

                                               help build a kinder future, and Do Better Project for a Better World

( Golden 5 month GED lesson 22 of 67 plans),

   and  Babylon 5 review posts, from a Minbari Ranger’s perspective,

               and can historical fiction stories inspires learning and courage, Ann and Willow??

l’Shalom, Peace

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

Shira

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


Continue reading Parashat VaEra, and No Words

Parashat Shemot, and Naming a Nation

     This week’s Torah portion, Parashat Shemot 5782 / פָּרָשַׁת שְׁמוֹת  Read on / 21 Tevet 5782, is the first parashah in the book of Exodus/Shemot.    Now, we see the start of a new epoch.  That of the baby Moses, saved from The River by two courageous women who actually get named!!  Not a normal thing for women in the Bible or in Western history, for that matter.  In fact, those two facts are probably related.

   The names of the ’70 persons’ who went down to Egypt with Israel, the patriarch, are recorded now, becoming the tribes who go up out of Egypt later.  Rumor has it that one woman lived the entire time, and was the one to lead them to the place where the bones of Joseph should be buried.  I’m sure one of our commentators will refresh my memory with the details?

      How can we make the future more certain and safe for all of us?

   What do you think,   Thoughtful Readers?

 

Action Prompts:

1.)  Share your thoughts on how including women in our history might help keep all of us safer, please.

2.)  Write a book, story, post or tweet that uses these thoughts.

Parashah 12, last in the book of Bereshit/Genesis, was last week…

 

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for COVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport

Read, Write

-we can learn from the past Stayed on Freedom’s Call for free,

                by Teaching and Learning (Lesson Plans offline) in the present, to

                                               help build a kinder future, and Do Better Project for a Better World

( Golden 5 month GED lesson 22 of 67 plans),

   and  Babylon 5 review posts, from a Minbari Ranger’s perspective,

               and can historical fiction stories inspires learning and courage, Ann and Willow??

l’Shalom, Peace

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

Shira

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


Continue reading Parashat Shemot, and Naming a Nation