Category Archives: libros

Spanish Saturdays and books on slavery then, and family now

Since I’ve been a bit lacking on my reading of Don Quixote, I’m going to refer back to a book I read a while ago, that has become more timely again. It was written mostly in Spanish, but had so many sections written in French, with the odd section also in English, that I was glad to be fully trilingual.  (Clearly, speaking three languages in the same lang. family do not build sufficient empathy to prevent chattel slavery, so my hypothesis on empathy may not hold water, but I still hold out hope!)    I’m not sure if there were translations in the footnotes, or if the refs were to other notations, but either way, this work was both thorough and exhausting to read.  Also, very, very saddening.

My most pertinent notes:

0.91% “està enlinea junto con el articulo pdf de Santana-Portillo-Lopez…\n Shira\n 25.11.12015 12015 HE

page 33
 

7.52% “P.33 Las Ordenanzas No Fueron Cumplidas…

The Orders (to protect the Native population) were Not Obeyed…

protested as: “Como si los indios fuesen africanos!”

shows how little Africans were thought of…

January 7, 2016 –

 

page 135
 

30.75%“Manzilla: los esclavos españoles tuvieron derecho de casarse, y entonces tuvieron nombres de familia propios.\n (Spanish slaves could marry, thus had their own family names).\n 7.1.12016 EH”

 
January 12, 2016 –

 

page 167
 

38.04% “la Iglesia -en contra del costumbre en EEUU…\n the Church, contrari to costume in USA…”

 

My 5xs gr grandfather Miles Manzilla was purchased from Caroline Co, VA during the colonial period, with his own surname at the time, which was quite unusual.  It’s possible that he was from a Caribbean setting originally, or was sold through Spanish hands.

Note that the fact that the Roman Catholic Church respected the sacrament of marriage for slaves made a difference (or should have) in the largest slave sale known: the #GU272, the sale of 314 Jesuit owned enslaved people from southern MD to Louisiana, in 1838.   The Enslaved Persons with spouses off of the four Jesuit plantations involved in the sale were not supposed to be sold south, by order of senior Jesuits in Rome.  Unfortunately, we know that none of those orders were obeyed, either.  More information on that if anyone is interested.

So,  I hope to be back on track with Don Miguel de Cervantes next week, friends:

 

Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different resources to translate the word “Hello” into Spanish.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how you like each of the resources you found,  perhaps as an update on your GoodReads reading,

4.) Write a blog post or tweet that uses a Spanish word, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Dear Readers, any additional ideas toward learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning as part of on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !

ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

Book review: The History of Black Slavery in Pueto Rico -still relevant in the USA today… Revista: Historia de La Esclavitud Negra En Puerto Rico

Historia de La Esclavitud Negra En Puerto RicoHistoria de La Esclavitud Negra En Puerto Rico by Luis M. Soler

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This extensive and not easy to read, but well worthwhile history of slavery in Puerto Rico, shows the importance not only of where we have been, but also what tools we have now and how to evaluate them in the light of past and present situations. The author comments that a Cooperative could have saved the small coffee producers of Puerto Rico, though not on whether that would have enabled the liberation of their enslaved workers. Yet this is a step forward in the analysis of both labour relations and the history of People of Color in the Americas.

I now also know that the family of my enslaved 5xGreat Grandfather Miles Manzilla could even have originated in Spain itself, potentially. Our shared origins are important to know, both for understanding why enslaved workers would have defended their masters during Indian attacks, and also in deciding how to relate to our history of enslavement today. What feelings remain to be resolved on all sides?

P. 15 del pdf = P. 21 del libro
La Corona y los esclavagistas se creaban liberales y generosos, evidentemente, pero sus

esclavos no compartieron ese sentimiento!
The Crown and owners thought themselves generous, but their slaves disagreed!

P. 25=32: Ya sabîa Bartolomé de Las Casas pero no de Fray Antonio de Montesinos a favor de los

indigenes.
Dominicans vs Franciscans ??

P.33 Las Ordenanzas No Fueron Cumplidas… (The Orders of the King to protect the

Indigenous/Indian/Native Population Not Obeyed…)

but “Como si los indios fuesen africanos!” -Nice, Thanks. Now I know which part of my blood

sits higher…

P.33=P.40: At least he admitted his error before he died; Al menos se admetîa su error antes

de su muerte.

Updates online… (Courtney, Richard H., Ruth A., Michelle, Thomas and Mel will certainly like

this book, and Akshat Liked an early update…)

P.77pdf=P.86 del documento: The author thinks that a Cooperative would have saved small

producers in PR from the falling coffee prices (due to Cuban overproduction)…

P.109pdf=P.119 book: Pardos must be like me: morenos claros ?

P. 111pdf=P.119 book: Alot of English testimony from ship captains: 14 British citizens sold

into slavery by contrabandists, apparently never freed (though 7 were identified!!).

P. 126 So France had a Black Code, too? Of course, where did the southern colonies/states

(USA) get them from…

3 November, 1839: Pope Gregory XVI condemned the Slave Trade? and Baltimore, and Maryland…

In summary, there was not only lots of Mestisage, but a good bit of back-and-forthing of slaves between PR and the English and French-speaking colonies. Thus, entirely possible that Miles Manzilla, Sr’s family was of Spanish colony origin.

Read, Write, Run, Teach !

updated from orig. post:  18 February, 12016 HE

View all my reviews

Saturday Spanish: Learning languages to bring harmony to …

I’m currently finishing a book by the Dalai Lama about harmony, or ethics, sort of. I read it in Spanish because that was what came to hand to read, and I found that I missed Spanish, and still miss dreaming of living in Andalusia. I no longer permit myself to dream that dream, but I do continue to at least try to read in Spanish, to keep up my literacy. So I am starting volume I of Don Quixote, and if you don’t mind the occasional comment in Spanish, please tell me, Dear Readers, so that I know how much of which language (English or Spanish) to use.

My review:

“Ayudar a los demas
Helping others, not standing idly by while the blood of your neighbor is shed…” November 6, 2018 – 21.0% “P. 41 ” el odio y la ira nos lleva a perder todo sentido de la proporcion “” November 7, 2018 – 22.0% “Excellent point I’m glad that I did not write the book that a friend asked me to write about 10 years ago, because this is the book I would have written more or less minus the Buddhism.” November 15, 2018 – 25.0% “La empatia = sentir y compartir/experimentar los sentidos de los demas.” November 15, 2018 – 33.0% “Arg : natura. = Viv., -> compassion…” November 15, 2018 – 34.0% “on page 77 he speaks of tierra pura, pure earth or new earth, or heaven, but he neglects the idea of places like Valhalla, the Viking warrior paradise…” November 16, 2018 – 38.0% “Que es la lujuria?” February 18, 2019 – 86.0% “”…compasiôn… nos acerca a la felicidad” -pero demasiado nos da pena, tb. (como cuando lloro por los pordioseros frente al metro…)

“compassion… leads us to happiness” -but too much also harms us
(as when I cry because of the homeless in front of the Metro…)” February 26, 2019 – 86.0% “”si va mas alla del hecho de afrontar la injusticia, si se …”

“disociar entre acto y agente…”” July 20, 2020 – 86.0% “Perdí mis notas, pero creo que decía que comportamientarse de manera ética ahora el sufrimiento psyjologica.”

Este libro, por supuesto, es bien pensado, pero bastante evidente. Me costó mucho trabajo leer lo que leí, y en fin, no lo pude terminar.

This book was well-thought-out, of course, but, pretty obvious. I had a very difficult time getting into it, and finally I had to give up.

Books, film, and other forms of media, like comic books, aka graphic novels, and music all have a strong effect on how people view the world. So, here are some Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Download some public domain version of a classic book,

2.) Read a page,

3.) Share your thoughts on that page, perhaps as an update on your GoodReads reading,

4.) Write a novel that references a classic book, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical (slavery era Baltimore) fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Other ideas welcome on how to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail, starting with improving these four parts of our good #PublicDomainInfrastructure:

1. #libraries,

2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,

3. #UniversalHealthCare, and

4. good #publictransport

Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !

#PublicDomainInfrastructure #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19 ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

How a missed trash can led to Formation Tortue, but learning languages can help treating childhood trauma

Why did that paper ball flying over my head make me dive for the floor?

Shortly after I turned 51 years of age, a young coworker launched a simple balled up bit of paper at the trash can in front of me. It missed. What I saw was not a mere bit of paper becoming litter, however. Out of the corner of my eye, something came flying at me from behind. I reacted instinctively: by ducking. Since this was not the normally appropriate behavior for a 51 year old woman in an office environment, you can well imagine my embarrassment. My coworker apologized profusely: the poor thing had simply missed a trash can with a tiny bit of paper. What he saw was a reaction out of an earthquake drill. I also apologized profusely, but the damage was already done. For the rest of the day, coworkers eyed me suspiciously and slowly walked over to place their trash in the bin. The awkwardness was palpable, and I was grateful when some of my Mexican coworkers began talking and joking in Spanish, drawing attention away from the incident.

As I sat on my afternoon break with a cup of hot water, I suddenly recalled a time I haven’t thought of in over 40 years. Another object was flying over my head from behind me, but it was not a simple bit of paper.
It was a belt buckle.
Pandemonium had broken loose as an old man bellowed his wrath, and swung his belt. I was the only person in the room not running away. For some reason, I could see the old man, the belt, and the other kids in the room. All looked either furious or frightened. But it all seemed to be happening somewhere else, with me simply frozen in place. The sounds were there, but muted as if in an old fashioned film.

It suddenly hit me that this event was from a time that I had worked very hard to forget. I’d been 9 years old, in the house overnight of a babysitter who was rather negligent. I told my mother, yet she did nothing. So, I forgot. But I never knew why objects flying over my head made me panic; until today.

Spanish, in particular Mexican Spanish, has always been my favorite language to switch into when I need to move my thoughts out of English. As a child, I’d always wished that I had magical powers to allow me to fight, or that I had a fairy sister to defend me, but the reality was that I was thrown back upon my own resources, so hiding or being ready to run usually seemed to be my best option. Hiding from my own thoughts was fairly easily accomplished, even in my dreams at times, by singing or thinking in Spanish.

It turned out that I could not hide from myself indefinitely. Things we’d rather not remember have a way of springing up, in the end. As I began to get therapy for events from my childhood it turned out that hiding and forgetting was not an effective way of dealing with those events. I had to relive them, again. This was probably more frustrating for my therapists than it even was for me, as I was told again and again that pushing away the memories would only make my #C-PTSD worse. But the focus on just being functional made it easy to ignore, once I was back in a job where I could pour my time and attention into something complex. (This 13-26 week cap that Medicaid puts on the number of sessions is yet another reason that we need full #UniversalHealthCare for everyone. Complex cases of many illnesses require long-term therapy that, when covered, will make for a healthier work force and population, not just the functional-to-panic-back-to-functionality roller coaster that kills so much time and so many people, in the end…)

The final straw arrived when the regional economy took a dive, sending myself and the vast majority of people I knew out of work. Some went to California, and I went overseas for work. In a new country and environment, stress flared up, and so did my panic anxiety. But this time I had to talk to a therapist in a language I was only just beginning to learn. As it turned out, I was finally able to access a good bit of the emotional content, while remaining present and able to stem the tide of anxiety during each session. As we began to unpack more of the childhood memories I’d been avoiding, being forced to express myself in a language I was still learning appeared to keep me emotionally distanced enough to prevent being pulled completely into the pain of the original event. When I came back to the USA, I found in California that having a Mexican therapist allowed us to switch from my native English, which was required to access the full emotion of the memory, into Spanish. So when she needed to lower the intensity level of the session, but keep me in the memory, she would switch into Spanish, distancing me just enough from the experience to process it. Who would have thought that #learning a #language could help in this case? But, it did.

So, what would Astérix do? He’d ask the Druid Panoramix, who would say: Il faut #ArreterdeFumer tout de suite !!

Let’s #EndPoverty , #EndHomelessness ,& #EndMoneyBail starting by improving these four parts of our good #PublicDomainInfrastructure 4: (
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare , and
4. good #publictransport )
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !


#PublicDomainInfrastructure & #‎StopSmoking for COVID-19
ShiraDest

April, 12020 HE

Alonso, por Omar R. La Rosa

Learning languages to read EMdT fanfic, or to get a better job (with health care): both are long-term good things, verdad?

Link and artwork used here by permission.

The image above of Alonso de Entrerríos, 16th century Spanish soldier and 21st century secret agent, is from a wonderful piece of fan fiction, written in Spanish, which is based on the series El Ministerio del Tiempo.   Learning a language gives one access not only to the joy of seeing historical settings come to life in the hands of skilled writers like the author of this serial work of fan fiction, Omar R. La Rosa, who continues to inspire “Ministericos” as dedicated followers of the series are called, but also gives one another advantage.

If you take the time,”about a year,” to learn a language that may or may not come in handy later, like Cmdr Ivanova, you too could end up commanding an elite force of future paladins dedicated to protecting the vulnerable and saving the galaxy!!  Maybe also saving the entire planet earth from COVID-19 by explaining to them in their own languages that smoking makes it worse, and why everyone needs #UniversalHealthCare! 🙂

“¡Por Santiago y por España!”
“We live for the One, we die for the One”

Let’s #EndPoverty , #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail starting by improving these four parts of our good #PublicDomainInfrastructure:
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare , and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !


#PublicDomainInfrastructure
ShiraDest

April, 12020 HE

Hermione Granger y Amelia Folch, que harîan ellas con el COVID-19

…sin duda, ir a la biblioteca!!
…clearly, they would go to the library!!

 

Where else can you learn how to help your fellow citizens combat the spread of this global pandemic, and also be a part of supporting a public institution stretching back to the earliest days of our Republic, and before?  Not only do public libraries feed our need for public knowledge, but they also feed our need for communal spaces where all can gather freely in community.   From disseminating key public health information to serving as polling places, census and social worker placements and entertainment/story telling locales, the public library is a crucial social institution that supports many facets of our democratic life.  From details on local and state level consumer rights information, from where to find current statutes of limitations to where we got the Statue of Liberty,  libraries serve many needs, and need more support.

Today, more than ever before, libraries need multiple language speakers, and we all need to learn multiple languages, to see how libraries in other places and how health care in other places work.

Aprendemos leyendo

We learn by reading

 

Let’s #EndPoverty , #EndHomelessness ,& #EndMoneyBail starting by improving these four parts of our #PublicDomainInfrastructure 4: (
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare , and
4. good #publictransport )
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !

#PublicDomainInfrastructure, ‪#‎stopsmoking and #languagelearn,
ShiraDest

March, 12020 HE

review/revista: Historia de La Esclavitud Negra En Puerto Rico

Historia de La Esclavitud Negra En Puerto RicoHistoria de La Esclavitud Negra En Puerto Rico by Luis M. Soler

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This extensive and not easy to read, but well worthwhile history of slavery in Puerto Rico, shows the importance not only of where we have been, but also what tools we have now and how to evaluate them in the light of past and present situations. The author comments that a Cooperative could have saved the small coffee producers of Puerto Rico, though not on whether that would have enabled the liberation of their enslaved workers. Yet this is a step forward in the analysis of both labour relations and the history of People of Color in the Americas.

I now also know that the family of my enslaved 5xGreat Grandfather Miles Manzilla could even have originated in Spain itself, potentially. Our shared origins are important to know, both for understanding why enslaved workers would have defended their masters during Indian attacks, and also in deciding how to relate to our history of enslavement today. What feelings remain to be resolved on all sides?

P. 15 del pdf = P. 21 del libro
La Corona y los esclavagistas se creaban liberales y generosos, evidentemente, pero sus

esclavos no compartieron ese sentimiento!
The Crown and owners thought themselves generous, but their slaves disagreed!

P. 25=32: Ya sabîa Bartolomé de Las Casas pero no de Fray Antonio de Montesinos a favor de los

indigenes.
Dominicans vs Franciscans ??

P.33 Las Ordenanzas No Fueron Cumplidas… (The Orders of the King to protect the

Indigenous/Indian/Native Population Not Obeyed…)

but “Como si los indios fuesen africanos!” -Nice, Thanks. Now I know which part of my blood

sits higher…

P.33=P.40: At least he admitted his error before he died; Al menos se admetîa su error antes

de su muerte.

Updates online… (Courtney, Richard H., Ruth A., Michelle, Thomas and Mel will certainly like

this book, and Akshat Liked an early update…)

P.77pdf=P.86 del documento: The author thinks that a Cooperative would have saved small

producers in PR from the falling coffee prices (due to Cuban overproduction)…

P.109pdf=P.119 book: Pardos must be like me: morenos claros ?

P. 111pdf=P.119 book: Alot of English testimony from ship captains: 14 British citizens sold

into slavery by contrabandists, apparently never freed (though 7 were identified!!).

P. 126 So France had a Black Code, too? Of course, where did the southern colonies/states

(USA) get them from…

3 November, 1839: Pope Gregory XVI condemned the Slave Trade? and Baltimore, and Maryland…

In summary, there was not only lots of Mestisage, but a good bit of back-and-forthing of slaves between PR and the English and French-speaking colonies. Thus, entirely possible that Miles Manzilla, Sr’s family was of Spanish colony origin.

Read, Write, Run, Teach !

ShiraDest
18 February, 12016 HE

View all my reviews

Thankful for… and A Little Help wThis IDentity Thing, pls?

The problem with thinking is that you start to ruminate, and that’s not good when a tractor comes by!   Today at least I got to finish my morning run before I started seriously ruminating.  (Kind of like the cows, but less smelly, I hope.)

But then I started, and Lo and Behold, my only good childhood memory came for a visit: Grandma Marie!

I must admit that I am thankful for my (adoptive) Great Grandmother, who taught me to fry chicken, to read, to write, and that “Cookin Lasts, Kissin Don’t.”

But the oddest part is that today I feel guilty for not dealing with my whole family of origin thing.  Not finishing my reading for the Latino Slaves research I started after looking up my 5xGr grandfather Miles Manzilla, for the WikiTree Slavery Project which, btw desperately needs someone to take it over, if anyone has time to volunteer (no, WikiTree is not perfect, but it is more open than others, and claims to want to build a Worldwide Family Tree).

And how do you figure out who you are, anyway?  My half-written climactic chapter  (which I need to finish by writing 3100 words Today -gack!!) is driving me crazy because the nutcase mixed-trying-to-escape-her-origins Protagonist  can’t decide between her origins and her husband’s culture.
Oh, and I haven’t eaten -probably explains that ‘burning from within’ in my stomach, and visions of cows becoming steak!! (sorry, cows, and Mr. Farmer neighbor…).
Ok, enough rumminating, sorry to have bored you guys, but I hope you all at least got a little laugh!

In Solidarity with All Kind People,
Peace via Cooperation and Non-Cooperation,
ShiraDest

26 November 12015 HE

Review/Revista: Arte de Probar: Ironia Logica En La India Antigua, Juan Arnau Navarro

1.) Tell your local Transit Board to build more LightRail stops, 2.) Tell your local city council to hire more librarians, add social workers and nurses to the library staff, and add washing stations to Public Library bathrooms, 3.) Ask your Community College Provost to give free classes on State Law Basics covering local land, property, contract and Statutes of Limitations laws, 4.) Ask your State Senators and Reps to pass Universal Health Care in your state, and tell your Congressmen to do likewise at the Federal level. Book review below:
Arte de Probar. Ironia Logica En La India AntiguaArte de Probar. Ironia Logica En La India Antigua by Juan Arnau Navarro
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book is an important and interesting comparison of Western and Eastern ways of thinking and debating. Drawing on many schools of thought, ancient and modern, this work explores how language forms us, and vice versa.

Este libro es una comparativa importante e interesante de maneras de pensar y debatir, Occidental como Oriental. Usando muchas escuelas de pensamiento, anciano y moderno, esta obra muestra como el idioma nos forma y nosotros al idioma también.

ShiraDest.
17 de septiembre del año 12,015 Era Holocena
Bretagne

View all my reviews

Let’s #EndPoverty , #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail starting by improving these four parts of our good #PublicDomainInfrastructure 4:
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !


#PublicDomainInfrastructure #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19
ShiraDest

updated slightly: August, 12020 HE

Review/Revista: El Sepulcro del Cuervo, por/by Núria Masot

El sepulcro del cuervoEl sepulcro del cuervo by Núria Masot
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

To think, to dare, and to love. Absolutely inspiring. This last book of Masot’s quintology is as good as the Very Good first (La Sombra del Templario), nearly as good as the Extremely Good second book (Laberinto: El Laberinto de la Serpiente) of this series. More inter-generational than Harry Potter(Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone), and using the test of war (though battle scenes are almost never seen) as the coming of age ritual for both young men who come of age in the series, there remains a paradox. The teacher Bernard, who dies in the very start of book 1, remains a constant presence throughout the series. He is the real hero.

ShiraDest
28 August, 12015 HE
Bretagne

Pensar, atreverse y amar. Absolutamente inspirador. Este ultimo libro de la quintologia de Masot està tan buena como el Muy Buen (La Sombra del Templario) primer libro, y casi casi tanto como el Buenisimo segundo (el Laberinto: El Laberinto de la Serpiente) de este serie. Se involucran màs los viejos con los jovenes que en el serie de Harry Potter (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone), y se usa la guerra como preuba de maturidad para los dos jovenes hecho hombres en el serie. Pero queda un paradoxo. El maestro Bernard, quien muere al comienzas del libro 1, se queda como una presencia constante en todo los libros. Es el verdadero protagonista.

Shira “Era Holocena/Humana” Destinie
28 Augosto del año 12 015 EH
Britanica

View all my reviews