Tag Archives: AdulthoodChallengeProjectGrids

Writing Process: Removing a Darling Comment

     Volunteering can be most difficult in health settings.   This is part of what Phase II will help build,  Escorts starting about 15-20 years from now as Phase I draws to a close, by building a cadre of Serving Adults (and here is the comment I removed): 

A timeline for building support for a robust public health system could run as long as the generation currently in charge of funding the system, but that is time we do not have.

     So, I continue to work on draft #6 Project Do Better’s manifesto,

marketing person woman coffee
Photo by Anna Nekrashevich on Pexels.com

 now re-writing Part II.    I Just found and added Austria’s new train service, which is how Phase I helps get us to Phase II, on page 110!! 

     I look forward to hearing your opinions, Thoughtful Readers.

We can really  Do Better.

-Shira   

 

Action Prompts:

    Share your thoughts on how to build buy-in create a more equal, or at least less inequitable, society, please.   Guest posts are always welcome.  Writing, by the way, is my personal contribution to Project Do Better

What would yours be, if you had time?

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan:Muhafiz/The Protector, Lupin, or La Casa De Papel/Money Heist Reviews,

Holistic College Algebra & GED/HiSET Night School Lesson Plans,

           or My Nonfiction  & Historical Fiction Serial Writing

Thoughtful Readers, please consider reading about #ProjectDoBetter.

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BsCs

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Continue reading Writing Process: Removing a Darling Comment

Service Adulthood Began Early, With Compassion In Oakland

     Volunteering can take many forms, whether by helping, as the CCC did (and does, in California), with nature and infrastructure maintenance, or by helping to keep others safe, as this new organization is doing in response to recent hate crimes.   This is part of what Phase II will work toward on a larger scale,  Escorts starting about 15-20 years from now as Phase I draws to a close, by building a cadre of Serving Adults: 

“…700 people of all races and backgrounds have volunteered to work with Compassion in Oakland.

     So, I continue to work on Project Do Better’s manifesto, now re-writing Part II.

     I look forward to hearing your opinions, Thoughtful Readers.

We can really  Do Better.

-Shira   

 

Action Prompts:

    Share your thoughts on how to build buy-in create a more equal, or at least less inequitable, society, please.   Guest posts are always welcome.  Writing, by the way, is my personal contribution to Project Do Better

What would yours be, if you had time?

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan:Muhafiz/The Protector, Lupin, or La Casa De Papel/Money Heist Reviews,

Holistic College Algebra & GED/HiSET Night School Lesson Plans,

           or My Nonfiction  & Historical Fiction Serial Writing

Thoughtful Readers, please consider reading about #ProjectDoBetter.

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BsCs

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Continue reading Service Adulthood Began Early, With Compassion In Oakland

We can Do Better Wednesdays, and Homes for All: Chapter 8, section III. E.

This post was the start of the rough draft of (5/5 of Phase II) Chapter 8 of my non-fiction WiP, Do Better, fka Baby Floors.  The finished book has now been published, free to communities and volunteers.   This part of chapter 8 will begin the later years of A Home for Every Person, mapping out a path to get there for Phase II, with a potential new service-adulthood rite of passage.

Sorry, Dear Readers, I forgot, earlier, that this chapter has 5 sections per early and late, rather than the usual 4.

The overall objective remains that of putting a floor on poverty so that each and every baby born can have a safe childhood.

Outlines for chapter 8 will attempt to match with each section, at the bottom of each post.

Once again, by way of disclaimer, the overall goal is now to explain why we need both equ. + justice, & why in 4 phases.  This chapter is part of showing what Phases I-IV could look like as potential roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us.  This vision is laid out in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met, without taking anything from anyone, and without violence, intimidation, nor coercion of any kind. 

(Chapter 8, III. D. was last week)

III. E  ch8e

III. E (x/1000 wds).  Recognition

1. (260/250)

The last 5-7 years of Phase II, where recognition of having met the requirements for a given community’s rite of passage Challenge are concerned, will  revolve around continuing to educate, and advocate for children’s rights as Human Rights, for lobbying to arm children with the tools they need to keep themselves and other safe, and around commitment to cooperation and teaching one another to learn more.  In these later years of this phase, the recognition conferred upon those who have passed The Challenge in various communities should give the equivalent of an informal status of educator, at least within the community where the candidate has been recognized as an “Adult” meeting those community standards, and hence as a person capable of and responsible for helping lead efforts to educate others.  Such recognition makes these “Adults” strong advocates both for continuous learning in every way, and also for new ways of educating and equipping children for citizenship, due to the fact that these advocates have proven that they know how to cooperate, to teach themselves and others, and to do so with full empathy, both interpersonal or in-group, and social empathy.  Thus, they will be well placed to lobby for stronger rights for children, within safe community.  They will also be the core of a cadre of people entirely committed to making sure that every child has a sense of safe belonging, and a caring and supportive community to fall back upon.  This is the highest and principle duty of every person called to serve in community, and in our society.

 

 

 

2. (263/250)

The sets of measurement tools, and the milestones for the later stages for Phase II, for  decision-making around the recognition of new Adults in each community, should be evaluated and adjusted, if needed, at this time.  Testing committees in each community may find it necessary to add requirements, depending on the needs of that community.  The number of recognized Adults should be taken into consideration, at this point, as well as the then current trend for what the numbers look like up to the end of this phase, for deciding, as an entire community, whether to extend Phase II up to another 5 years further for that particular community.  The question of whether to examine or talk with each person who has been taught by candidates for recognition should have been settled by every community engaging in this new rite of passage, by this time.  Likewise, the question of whether goals for the numbers of candidates, recognized Adults, etc, should have been worked out within the community by this point, and possibly even opened up for comment by the remaining communities, or even the larger public, depending on the needs and desires of each particular community.  The idea is to measure in some way the progress being made during this time in building greater flexibility of thinking both within each community, and also in the surrounding geographical community, and the larger overall society and public.  Recognition of the success of those who have undergone this rite of passage is yet another tool that may help in building the needed societal flexibility of thought.

 

 

3. (293/250)

Again, in the last years of Phase II, the tools and some of the 1-minute activities developed by communities earlier for use in giving recognition to successful candidates for this new rite of passage should be joined to legal campaigns in favor of protecting every person, and safe and accessible travel for all members of society.  Every person should have the right and the real ability to travel within and between cities in comfort, safety, and efficiency.  An American version of the European Gap Year travel campaign, such as a ‘Travel To Learn’ campaign, may help with making this a reality.  If the teaching test remains part of the adulthood rite of passage challenge, communities may wish to consider whether it should come after, or maybe as part of the two year time period, a required travel experience, for a wider learning by living under a greater variety of conditions.  While a language learning requirement for that period may seem to be a bit too much of a difficulty to require of most candidates, many will benefit far more from having stretched themselves to the task of learning the local languages spoken before or while living in other parts of the country, like learning Latin American  or Puerto Rican Spanish in many parts of the US, or even French for some towns in Maine, and to link to Cajun if living in parts of Louisiana or Mississippi where the patois is still spoken.  After all, it is the most marginalized and left out of people whom this project aims to reach, help, and to lift up, and this task requires understanding both their particular ways of speaking and thinking, which can only be fully accomplished by learning at least some of their languages.  The robust mass transit system developed during Phase I, obviously, will be a major tool for this travel.

 

 

 

4. (275/250)

The purpose, both practical and symbolic, of the recognition of successful candidates in various communities, of The new adulthood rite of passage Challenge, should well be applicable to individuals, communities, and to our wider society.  Passing the final requirements for this Challenge should, quite likely, be recognized in a place that holds special significance for the community which is recognizing candidates as Adults.  This recognition can act as a doorway in a far longer journey, both for the candidates and for the communities recognizing their achievement.  On a practical level, this recognition means that those who succeed should now begin to lead us in innovation of learning practices, tools, ways of thinking, and habits of health in every way.  On a symbolic level, this recognition means that those who have thusly succeeded should now be leading their communities, our society, and the entire world in hope, and in creative problem solving.  More tools for governance, and indeed for wider ways of thinking, will need to be created that meet both our practical needs and our human need for symbol and ceremony.  The new governance tools and teaching practices that we will need to develop, share, and learn to use, as a society, should be conceived, developed, refined, and shared by this new generation of upcoming leaders, as they teach us how to continue learning, stretch ourselves, share, and cooperate ever more effectively.  This new paradigm will be extended further in the next years, as we come to the close of Phase, II, and the beginning of Phase III, with the Three Universals, Plus.  We now move to the details of this next phase in chapter 9.

— (Next Wednesday: Chapter 9, section I. )

 

I’m considering this Rough Draft as the block of clay from which my book will eventually emerge, obviously, and some ideas for phases III and IV are still becoming more  fixed in my mind as I write, so the final version will likely look pretty different from this Rough Draft, and will need updating once I get to the very end.

 

And once again, yeayyy( !!)with regard to audience, I may have at least a couple of comps:  Walden Two meets The War on Poverty: A Civilian Perspective (by Dr.s Jean and Edgar Cahn, 1964).  I know that lots of people consider Skinner’s writing to be stilted, but I like the tilt of most reviewers, in that the idea is that a community should keep trying policies that members agree upon until they find what works for all of them.

As for genre, I’m still wondering:  clearly part of  Non-fiction.

  Many thanks to Dr. Garland for suggesting Philosophy

Maybe also: System Change, Causes, maybe even Inspirational, but I doubt it.

Action Items:

1.) Consider some ideas you may have on how our society can solve homelessness and child abuse, starting right now,

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please, and

3.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

Babylon 5Hakan: Muhafiz/The ProtectorLupin, or La Casa de Papel (aka Money Heist) Reviews

Holistic High School Lessons,

           or Long Term Nonfiction & Historical Fiction Writing

Shira

Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones, MPhil

 

Wondering Wednesdays, Do Better, Chapter 8, section III. D.: 4/5 of a map for the later years of Phase II

This post is part of the rough draft of  Chapter 8 of my non-fiction WiP, Do Better, fka Baby Floors.   This part of chapter 8 will begin the later years of mapping out a path to get there for Phase II, with a potential new adulthood rite of passage.

Sorry, Dear Readers, I forgot that this chapter has 5 sections per early and late, rather than the usual 4.

The overall objective remains that of putting a floor on poverty so that each and every baby born can have a safe childhood.

Outlines for chapter 8 will attempt to match with each section, at the bottom of each post.

Once again, by way of disclaimer, the overall goal is now to explain why we need both equ. + justice, & why in 4 phases.  This chapter is part of showing what Phases I-IV could look like as potential roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us.  This vision is laid out in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met, without taking anything from anyone, and without violence, intimidation, nor coercion of any kind. 

(Chapter 8, III. C. was last week)

III. D   ch8D

III. D (x/1000 wds).  The Ritual

1. (253/250)

The last 5-7 years of Phase II, where the ritual related to passing The Adulthood Challenge are concerned, will involve increase educating, advocating, and now lobbying, for the rights of children, with this ritual as one of the catalysts for discussion.  Education at this point in the process should revolve around preparing communities and the larger public for taking responsibility for learning new ways of thinking, always based on the greater Human Rights related principles.  Advocacy, for instance, for a book per person, written by hand as part of a useful physical challenge.  Education and innovations in the tools used to educate ourselves is obviously involved with regard to the person being taught that critical and difficult life skill, if the Teaching Terror requirement for the rite of passage is used in a given community.  The ritual could conceivably involve candidates bringing an object which they have found or made, as part of the ritual.  Lobbying around adulthood and safe childhoods for all of us may mean that society can finally start to define adulthood not as the mere reaching of a certain age, but as the proof of commitment to service of society and of human empathy.  At its core, the essence, after all, of being an adult, is to take responsibility for what needs to be done, and to learn how to do it, while helping others to meet their needs as well.  Bringing out that essential quality in all of us is the goal of this part of our project.

 

 

2. (258/250)

The sets of measurement tools, and the milestones for the later stages for Phase II, for ritual related decision-making will need to be adjusted, in coordination with the other parts of the work of this phase, by each community creating a ritual for the new rite of passage.  This would be an appropriate time to asses whether the milestones have yet brought each community to where it planned to be by this point in time, and whether new measurement tools are needed to help making that determination.  The E1T1 groups should, by now, have become regular weekly events, and could mark the achievement of a major milestone, should communities decide that this meets an important set of needs for them.  An important question for communities to decide upon is whether or not members of the E1T1 groups should be allowed to attend the ritual when an organized of their group is a candidate for recognition as anAdult.  The Ritual may also require new tools and new ways to measure progress related to the ritual, from designing the ritual itself, and the participation by community members as this phase progresses, to post ritual assessment of how it helped candidates, community members, and the public at large.  Communities may find it helpful to invite ideas and even participation for the surrounding local community, and even from the public at large, providing that those ideas and that participation is in keeping with the spirit of their community, and meets the basic Human Rights ethic, and the standards of that community.

 

3. (253/250)

Again, in the last years of Phase II, the tools and some of the 1-minute activities developed around the Ritual should remind us all of the values to which we are committed.  Each community must decided and say to what extend they would like to invite public involvement in their community’s ritual for any given candidate, with as much of the reasoning being made public as well, not for criticism, nor for debate, but for the rest of us to learn from.  New 1-minute activities, campaign ideas, and tools leading to universally accessible and meaningful ways to participate in this process should also have a practical impact on daily public life in as many ways as possible.  Ongoing legal and public media campaigns related to child safety should be tied into this ritual and to the discussion around the ritual and the process leading up to it, as well, obviously, as the resulting status and that which goes with it.  Media and PSA campaigns on anti-hazing, self-control from within, and empathy should be wrapped into the ritual itself, if it is to be made public in any way, as well as the processes leading up to the ritual.  The point must be emphasized in the clearest ways possible for all to participate in, that this ritual and the entire set of processes surrounding it are meant to build and demonstrate both empathy, at the individual, family, and social level, as well as practical cooperative problem solving skills in the service of all humankind.

 

 

 

 

4. (250/250)

The purpose, both practical and symbolic, of the ritual after passing a community’s requirements to meet The Challenge, should be multiple, both for the individual, as for the community, and even for the larger society.  Since this is a coming of age ritual, as with any rite of passage, this ritual should be designed to allow the candidates to prove their ability to accomplish the assigned tasks.  But more than that, the tasks assigned must also be carefully chosen to further develop and demonstrate that candidates have the courage of their convictions, and that those convictions serve all of humankind, with Human Rights as the base.  It should also allow the community to test future leaders of that community in a safe and useful way.  It should, of course, give a meaning beyond merely having reached the age of 18, or 21, to the status of adulthood that can carry over successfully into the larger society as significant and meaningful for the larger public, as well.  A bit like becoming a commissioned officer in our armed services.  But it should also symbolize trust in the new generation of recognizedadults, and most importantly of all, this ritual should become a symbol of hope in and for Humanity.  Thus, the committee has a delicate job of designing a ritual that will show the strength of character of each candidate, in the best way possible, while also showing the value of both that candidate, and of this process, for our larger society.

 

— (Next Wednesday: Chapter 8, section III. E. )

 

I’m considering this Rough Draft as the block of clay from which my book will eventually emerge, obviously, and some ideas for phases III and IV are still becoming more  fixed in my mind as I write, so the final version will likely look pretty different from this Rough Draft, and will need updating once I get to the very end.

 

And once again, yeayyy( !!)with regard to audience, I may have at least a couple of comps:  Walden Two meets The War on Poverty: A Civilian Perspective (by Dr.s Jean and Edgar Cahn, 1964).  I know that lots of people consider Skinner’s writing to be stilted, but I like the tilt of most reviewers, in that the idea is that a community should keep trying policies that members agree upon until they find what works for all of them.

As for genre, I’m still wondering:  clearly part of  Non-fiction.

  Many thanks to Dr. Garland for suggesting Philosophy

Maybe also: System Change, Causes, maybe even Inspirational, but I doubt it.

Action Items:

1.) Consider some ideas you may have on how our society can solve homelessness and child abuse, starting right now,

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please, and

3.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

Babylon 5Hakan: Muhafiz/The ProtectorLupin, or La Casa de Papel (aka Money Heist) Reviews

Holistic High School Lessons,

           or Long Term Nonfiction & Historical Fiction Writing

Shira


Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

 

Wondering Wednesdays, Do Better, Rough Chapter 8, section III. C.: 3/5 of a map for the later years of Phase II

This post is part of the rough draft of  Chapter 8 of my non-fiction WiP, Do Better, fka Baby Floors.   This part of chapter 8 will begin the later years of mapping out a path to get there for Phase II, with a potential new adulthood rite of passage.

ch8C

Sorry, Dear Readers, I forgot that this chapter has 5 sections per early and late, rather than the usual 4.

The overall objective remains that of putting a floor on poverty so that each and every baby born can have a safe childhood.

Outlines for chapter 8 will attempt to match with each section, at the bottom of each post.

Once again, by way of disclaimer, the overall goal is now to explain why we need both equ. + justice, & why in 4 phases.  This chapter is part of showing what Phases I-IV could look like as potential roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us.  This vision is laid out in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met, without taking anything from anyone, and without violence, intimidation, nor coercion of any kind. 

(Chapter 8, III. B. was last week)

III. C

III. C (1106/1000 wds).  Why undergo The Challenge, in the later years of Phase II?

1. (258/250)

The last 5-7 years of Phase II, where the many reasons for attempting the Challenge are concerned, will  tie together the education around our society’s very attitudes toward education, advocacy for greater cooperation in education, earlier tools, and lobbying for more flexible long term thinking in a variety of areas, education included.  First, by the middle to ending years of Phase II, one out come of the discussion around why to consider a new adulthood rite of passage ought to have generated increasing amounts, and hopefully also quality, of discussion among the larger public around education.  By considering the question, and proposing a marker, so to speak, of who is an adult, and what constitutes adulthood, this project hopes, by the 20 to 25 years that will have passed since the inception of Phase I by this point in time, to have generated both advocacy and public debate on the issues of early childhood education, emancipated minors and their needs, and child abuse and ways to prevent it from the all sources.  This will also be the time to check on whether, in consultation with the entire community, to change the initial time for this phase from 15 to up to 20 years, depending on the needs of each particular community.  Lobbying for increased support for all types of education, and especially for help for abused and vulnerable children, should be stepped up at this point.  By the end of this phase, we should see a new generation of “Adults” beginning to take the lead in this issues.

 

 

 

2. (270/250)

The sets of measurement tools, and the milestones for the later stages for Phase II, for  decision-making around new governance tools, adulthood, and adjustment of the time line by each community in this project, should have input from all concerned parties, especially the new “Adults” in every community.  Each community should set, if necessary, new milestones, and consider additional ways to help measure progress toward those milestones, as they adjust the time line for this phase based on progress made thus far, in coordination with the rest of their community committees for other parts of this phase.  New governance tools, from  RCV/irv, to PB, to sortition for the community assemblies and committees, should be used as an example, and to work out the kinks in these tools before proposing their use on a wider scale.  New tools for direct democracy, for setting agendas, and ways of allowing every person to contribute their voice and have a say in both these processes, and in our wider societal governance processes, should be used and fine tuned starting at this time.  Showing the numbers of new Adults helping in this process of education and advocacy for old tools, and developing new tools, may be one way of measuring the effect of this new rite of passage within each community.  Other ways of measuring the effects of this process on the local community and on the wider public should also be actively created and developed as well, remembering that this process, this new rite  of passage, this phase, and indeed, this entire project, are meant to benefit the Human Rights of all people.

 

 

 

 

3. (299/250)

Again, in the last years of Phase II, the tools and some of the 1-minute activities developed earlier for this phase can continue to provide reasons for the entire larger public to support communities who choose to engage in the task of creating this new rite of passage.  These tools, activities, campaigns, and even legal activity around what was once seen as the coming of age of a person, can help making this new rite of passage more meaningful for all of society, while introducing new governance ideas, tools, and processes.  At this stage of the second phase of our overall project, about 27 years or so will have passed since the start of the entire work, and this Challenge, in particular, over the past 5 to 7 of those years, should have generated a good level of discussion and engagement, at least among those who were involved in the work of Phase I.  Development of new tools will now start to fall to those who have more recently joined this project, as older members continue to mentor, but begin to move into the background, making way for the next generation as it comes up to speed and begins to create more and more new processes using those new tools.  New activities should allow every person, including those still having to work three jobs, take care of children and parents, and wait for the bus in the cold rain, to meaningfully participate in this process in some way.  New legal campaigns on behalf of the safety of all children and vulnerable people should be launched at this time, as well.  Finally, this point in the process should be used to set up ways to work for and build more flexible thinking in the wider society and new governance paradigms.

 

 

 

4. (251/250)

The purpose, both practical and symbolic, of the work of creating a new adulthood rite of passage, and in deliberately making it a Challenge, should have become evident by this point in the project for both the individuals involved in the process, for the communities creating the process, and for society via the new cohort of volunteers trained to work together in building new systems as cooperators.  The practical uses of tools like irv/RCV, PB, etc, should have now been shown to be useful to the larger public, likely through the use of these tools within the communities engaged in this project, via their published minutes and discussions.  This new rite of passage can be a symbol of new ways of moving forward as a society, and indeed, as an entire world, if we all only choose to make this happen.  The new “adults” who have proven themselves to be committed to the service of Humankind, with Human Rights first and foremost in that mindset, are now nearly all prepared, or should be, to begin taking the reigns of these processes and moving forward, with the older members staying on as guides, while providing the stability and continuity of that of an elder statesman, in the way that former President Jimmy Carter has done.  These new adults have also proven, through this new rite of passage, their abilities to solve complex problems with empathy and cooperative courage.  This new cohort of “Adults,” therefore, represents renewed hope for all of humanity.

 

— (Next Wednesday: Chapter 8, section III. D. )

 

I’m considering this Rough Draft as the block of clay from which my book will eventually emerge, obviously, and some ideas for phases III and IV are still becoming more  fixed in my mind as I write, so the final version will likely look pretty different from this Rough Draft, and will need updating once I get to the very end.

 

And once again, yeayyy( !!)with regard to audience, I may have at least a couple of comps:  Walden Two meets The War on Poverty: A Civilian Perspective (by Dr.s Jean and Edgar Cahn, 1964).  I know that lots of people consider Skinner’s writing to be stilted, but I like the tilt of most reviewers, in that the idea is that a community should keep trying policies that members agree upon until they find what works for all of them.

As for genre, I’m still wondering:  clearly part of  Non-fiction.

Maybe also: System Change, Causes, maybe even Inspirational, but I doubt it.

Action Items:

1.) Share some ideas you may have on how our society can solve homelessness and child abuse, starting right now,

2.)   Write a book, story, blog post, or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

Hakan: Muhafiz/The Protector, Lupin, & Money Heist Reviews

Holistic High School Lessons,

 
 

Shira

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Wondering Wednesdays, Do Better, Chapter 8, section III. B.: 2/5 of a map for the later years of Phase II

This post is the start of the rough draft of  Chapter 8 of my non-fiction WiP, Do Better, fka Baby Floors.   This part of chapter 8 will begin the later years of mapping out a path to get there for Phase II, with a potential new adulthood rite of passage.  ch8B

Sorry, Dear Readers, I forgot that this chapter has 5 sections per early and late, rather than the usual 4.

The overall objective remains that of putting a floor on poverty so that each and every baby born can have a safe childhood.

Outlines for chapter 8 will attempt to match with each section, at the bottom of each post.

Once again, by way of disclaimer, the overall goal is now to explain why we need both equ. + justice, & why in 4 phases.  This chapter is part of showing what Phases I-IV could look like as potential roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us.  This vision is laid out in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met, without taking anything from anyone, and without violence, intimidation, nor coercion of any kind. 

(Chapter 8, III. A. was last week)

III. B

III. B (1112/1000 wds).  Declaration of intent to undergo The Challenge

 

1. (274/250)

Education and advocacy, during the last 5-7 years of Phase II, where the declaration of intention to attempt the Challenge are concerned, will likely need to revolve around building volunteer Community Assemblies.  These assemblies should, by this time, be on track to decide whether their communities wish to conduct some sort of examination, for potential adulthood rite of passage candidates, regarding the good faith intentions and reasons behind each candidate’s reasons for wanting to undergo The Challenge.  It seems to be a reasonable assumption that all parties involved have agreed to at least sign or affirm the intention to abide by some sort pledge in support of Human Rights, before starting this process, at a minimum.  This will be the time, also, at the midway point during Phase II, to check on whether the standard 15 years will be enough for this phase, or whether up to another 5 years should be added, by agreement of the entire community, to this phase.  Lobbying should also start, by this point, around insisting on greater funding for all learning related issues, such as early childhood education, in particular.  Progress in educating the public around why candidates choose to undergo The Challenge can also be related to the number of community assemblies formed thus far, and how those assemblies are making their decisions, and allowing input into their decision-making processes.  This is also a good time for advocating in the larger public around direct democracy and participatory decision-making.  Thus the example set by communities in their processes for this new rite of passage can lead the way as a set of prototype examples for larger societal processes.

 

 

2. (258/250)

The sets of measurement tools, and the milestones for the later stages for Phase II, for declaration decision-making, will revolve partly around who takes those declarations, who is informed of declarations, minutes from Community Assembly discussions of these declarations, where they are not deemed too personal for public access, and the risks, consequences, benefits, and desired outcomes for both The Challenge, and for the process around The Challenge.  Minutes of various meetings should help each community in deciding whether to set new milestones for this phase, as well as what statistics to use in measuring those milestones.  Community Assemblies can recommend time and action targets for this part of Phase II, and should coordinate the timeline for all of Phase II with  committees dealing with the other parts of this new rite of passage within each community.  Milestones should be evaluated for which have been met thus far, the number of potential and upcoming candidate declarations, and of course, for the consequences to communities thus far with regard to candidate questions.  Have the desired outcomes with regard to the Declaration met, in reality, what was hoped for by all parties, candidate, community, and the larger public?  Are changes needed to the procedure for making a declaration of intent, in those communities where such a declaration is required or desired, and what milestones should be set or reset in relation to such declarations?  Each of these questions should be guided by the larger picture, of Human Rights, of empathy, and of long term critical thinking for all of society.

 

3. (289/250)

Again, in the last years of Phase II, the tools and some of the 1-minute activities developed earlier should be joined by legal campaigns, if helpful, around the concept not only of eventually making the passage into adulthood more meaningful, in our larger society, but also of making childhood a safer experience for all of us.  The tools that have previously been used and adapted in the early years of this stage, like walking, pilgrimages, or pledges, should now be evaluated, at this halfway point, to see the effect so far, and determine how to change course, if need be, to achieve the remaining milestones for Phase II.  The various stats collected as well as any anecdotal information should be taken into account by committees to assess progress in this Phase, and how the process of the Declaration of Intent has helped, if at all.  New tools should also be in development, at this point, to help with incoming declarations, and with new candidates, and with measuring the effects on both the community and the wider public, not to mention individual candidates.  It should also be asked at this point whether prior prerequisites have been good proof of intent, without a specific declaration, and most importantly, whether the tools developed for this process have led to improved education in the greater community and in the public at large.  And lastly, but not least, public records and statistics should be checked in the geographical areas near communities in the process of taking declarations of intent from candidates, to see whether the process of looking into these declarations has had any effect, over the past 5-7 years of Phase II, on the larger public near communities actively engaging in this process.

 

 

 

 

4. (267/250)

The ultimate purpose, both practical and symbolic, of the process of the declaration of intent to undergo The Challenge, is to assure that the intent on the part of each and every candidate foradulthood in any community is to serve.  Have the potential candidates making required or suggested declarations in fact matched their deeds to their words, in organizing walks, pilgrimages, creating new tools, and has there been any observed difference between communities where such a declaration is required versus merely suggested, from those communities where no declaration is desired at all?  Has any pledge related to this phase been developed, and if so, what has been the engagement level around both taking the pledge, and following through on the words of that pledge?  Much like the “safety pin” movement following Brexit, making a pledge is one thing, while standing in front of a woman who has been thrown to the ground by her attacker may be quite another.  No pledge is required to do the right thing.  How, also, has social media reacted to communities where a declaration is desired, and to  candidates who have made such declarations?  Do the results from communities with a declaration requirement differ significantly from those that did not, and how have the results played out for individuals, and for members of the Community Assemblies?  Finally, and most importantly, have any of the overall statistics for public health hazing at local universities, and related educational numbers changed at all in apparent response to discussion around and use of this process of taking a declaration of intent for The Adulthood Challenge?

 

— (Next Wednesday: Chapter 8, section III. C. )

 

I’m considering this Rough Draft as the block of clay from which my book will eventually emerge, obviously, and some ideas for phases III and IV are still becoming more  fixed in my mind as I write, so the final version will likely look pretty different from this Rough Draft, and will need updating once I get to the very end.

 

And once again, yeayyy( !!)with regard to audience, I may have at least a couple of comps:  Walden Two meets The War on Poverty: A Civilian Perspective (by Dr.s Jean and Edgar Cahn, 1964).  I know that lots of people consider Skinner’s writing to be stilted, but I like the tilt of most reviewers, in that the idea is that a community should keep trying policies that members agree upon until they find what works for all of them.

As for genre, I’m still wondering:  clearly part of  Non-fiction. 

Maybe also: System Change, Causes, maybe even Inspirational, but I doubt it.

Action Items:

1.) Share some ideas you may have on how our society can solve homelessness and child abuse, starting right now,

2.)  Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

B5, The Protector, Lupin, or Money Heist Reviews…

Holistic High School Lessons,

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BsCs

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

 

Do Better, Chapter 8, section III. A: 1/5 of a map for the later years of Phase II

This post is the start (for a Reader who’d expressed interest in my writing process: the Featured Image is my high level outline, which I sketched initially, and the image below is my detailed outline for this section) of the rough draft of  Chapter 8 of my non-fiction WiP, Do Better, fka Baby Floors.   This part of chapter 8 will begin the later years of mapping out a path to get there for Phase II, with a potential new adulthood rite of passage. 

ch8A

Sorry, Dear Readers, I forgot that this chapter has 5 sections per early and late, rather than the usual 4.

The overall objective remains that of putting a floor on poverty so that each and every baby born can have a safe childhood.

Outlines for chapter 8 will attempt to match with each section, at the bottom of each post.

Once again, by way of disclaimer, the overall goal is now to explain why we need both equ. + justice, & why in 4 phases.  This chapter is part of showing what Phases I-IV could look like as potential roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us.  This vision is laid out in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met, without taking anything from anyone, and without violence, intimidation, nor coercion of any kind. 

(Chapter 8, II. E. was last week)

III. A

III. A (1196/1000 wds).

1. (327/250)

The last 5-7 years of Phase II, the 8th to 15th or 20th year of this phase, which will have been the 30th to 40th year of our overall project, should find the prerequisite requirements for attempting the Challenge to have been fairly well nailed down by many communities, at this point.  The prior emphasis on education around the need for each and every person to understand and be able to do certain tasks, and advocacy for each citizen to take the responsibility to help every person learn those things, now moves into a more urgent mode.  Committees working on this part of the project should check the timeline, and check of course with other committees in their communities, and decide whether this phase may need to have up to another 5 years added to it.  Lobbying for more education and library funding is also part and parcel of this phase of our overall project.  Reminding the public that higher educational and  physical training expectations lead to better health, confidence, and safety outcomes for all of us is also part of this phase.  Ideas like advocating for starting Tai Chi in the Park at 3, much like the “stranger danger” campaigns of the 1970s, can inculcate in our youngest citizens the importance of healthy movement for both self control and self defense.  Looking at the statistics for obesity, falls, osteoporosis, and other common public health measures, should already be starting to show a downward trend in physical exercise related health numbers.  Lobbying for free swimming and flotation classes including annual updates or ‘checkout swims’ as the FAA does for private pilot bi-ennial flight reviews, for all interested persons from the earliest possible age, at their local neighborhood swimming pools, should start to include requests for local health clinics to have a swimming pool added to them soon.  Other ideas may include education campaigns like “tie your shoe while standing on one foot” day, and other simple NonExcerciseActivity.

 

 

2. (270/250)

The sets of measurement tools, and the milestones for the later stages for Phase II, for decision-making around whether to require candidates to meet certain prerequisites before attempting this new rite of passage, should now move to consider adjusting the time frame, if needed, depending on the needs of each community.  The prerequisite for physical self defense can include the study of ballet, Pilates, Tai Chi and Yoga as ways of maintaining a healthy back and core muscles (with the caveat that ballet may not be considered healthy due to the damage it does to the skeleton if up on point too soon), and self defense classes for assertiveness and self confidence training.  Assertiveness and emotional self control through meditation training requirements could potentially be considered to be met through Aikido + Tai Chi, or Chi Kung, or any other form of moving meditation.  Keeping track of statistics should start to show increasing improvement for physical health statistics, and also gradually improving mental health statistics as well.  Emotional self defense training can include therapy for all, Tai Chi, and reflection time tools of various kinds.  One idea may be a “Journal for Good” campaign to encourage reflection on one’s feelings, and then applying that to how one could do some good deed based on it, such as a day in which one is feeling lonely leading to nodding or otherwise acknowledging one random person on the street, that day, perhaps on the walk to the metro, as a way of increasing “random acks of humanity.”  This campaign and other 1-minute activities should continue to be developed and tracked statistically and published.

 

 

3. (287/250)

Again, in the last years of Phase II, the tools and some of the 1-minute activities developed for or around the prerequisite requirements, where communities are including these, now combine with new legal campaigns.  The issue of emancipated minors and children who need to be able to live on their own, whether orphans, abused at home, or otherwise in need of authorization to live independently, may be highly relevant to this part of our project.  First, though, they need to have, and perhaps also demonstrate, the ability to protect themselves physically via a variety of physical self defense techniques, including awareness of their surroundings and potential threats, so as to avoid going there in the first place, and having the assertiveness to know and implement the fact that they have not only the right but also the obligation to protect themselves, and also others if need be.  These abilities and awarenesses, tools and activities should continue to drill and drive home, are important for both physical health and security, with emotional health benefits, as well.  Other tools, such as public health statistics, should be shared, particularly concentrating on swimming related health statistics, and our legal right to float up together, as that “rising tide lifts all boats,” and life rafts, too.  The tools should make it a point of noting, in some amusing or entertaining way, perhaps, that emotional health and financial health are also tied together, starting from the very earliest ages that one can hear adults screaming at each other.  From a legal point of view, children should have the right to protect themselves from the earliest age possible, for example, from the time that they are able to safely cook an egg by themselves.

 

 

4. (262/250)

The purpose, both practical and symbolic, of the prerequisites to The Challenge, during these last years of Phase II, for both individuals and for society should start to be seen, through statistical public health measures by this time, in the benefits to individual, community, and overall public health.  Physical self defense as we have said, entails, and thus must remember to build in to our tools and questions, both physical health determinant factors, like flexibility and core muscle strength, as well as nutritional and respiratory concerns, while not forgetting the obvious parts of physical self defense, such as locks, traps, bars, holds, and throws for smaller sized people, and also for those with various kinds of disabilities.  Health defense must also be included as part of physical self defense, over the long term.  Emotional self defense, and the role that emotions play in physical health, must be remembered as part of the overall societal impact on individual and public health.  Issues such as homelessness deeply affect the psychological health of every person, no matter how well off or how poor, given that the sight of human beings reduced to living on the streets implies that any one of us could end up in that situation, too.  Financial self defense is related, given the levels of various types of unjust debt, and the number of people unjustly involved in our criminal justice system.  Statistics for physical and mental health outcomes, anti-poverty funding, prison recidivism rates and new entries in to the penal system, and statistics related to hunger, childhood poverty, and early childhood education all related closely to each of these types of self defense, and all have the potential to help move our society to a more democratic and free society for all of us.

— (Next Wednesday: Chapter 8, section III. B. )

 

I’m considering this Rough Draft as the block of clay from which my book will eventually emerge, obviously, and some ideas for phases III and IV are still becoming more  fixed in my mind as I write, so the final version will likely look pretty different from this Rough Draft, and will need updating once I get to the very end.

 

 

As for genre, I’m still wondering:  clearly part of  Non-fiction.

Maybe also: Social PolicySystem Change, Causes, maybe even Inspirational, but I doubt it.

Action Items:

1.) Share some ideas you may have on how our society can solve homelessness and child abuse, starting right now,

2.)   Write a book, story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

*****************

Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan: Muhafiz (The Protector), Lupin, or Money Heist Reviews

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

 

Beta Readers Still Needed for Do Better

This Project is nearly ready, but cannot grow the Project without more Reviews .  Until then, I cannot publish and release this work into other hands.  I need help, please.

   This post is the start of the rough draft of  Chapter 8,Chapter 8, section II. E.: 5/5 of a map for the early years of Phase II,  of my non-fiction WiP, Do Better, fka Baby Floors.   This chapter will begin the early years of mapping out a path to get there for Phase II, with a potential new adulthood rite of passage.

Sorry, Dear Readers, I forgot that this chapter has 5 sections per early and late, rather than the usual 4.

The overall objective remains that of putting a floor on poverty so that each and every baby born can have a safe childhood.

Outlines for chapter 8 will attempt to match with each section, at the bottom of each post.

Once again, by way of disclaimer, the overall goal is now to explain why we need both equ. + justice, & why in 4 phases.  This chapter is part of showing what Phases I-IV could look like as potential roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us.  This vision is laid out in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met, without taking anything from anyone, and without violence, intimidation, nor coercion of any kind. 

(Chapter 8, II. D. was last week)

II. E

II. E (1129/1000 wds).

 

1. (260/250)

The first 5-7 years of Phase II, where recognition of having succeeded in passing the requirements of a given community for the Adulthood Challenge is concerned, will involve, in each community, educating and advocating for a ritual that will represent the successful completion of a useful and needed modern rite of passage.  In these early years, there may not yet be many volunteers on this part of the project, so educational work will need to build on the bonds created during Phase I, and the volunteers from those parts of this project.  Recognition for the work done back in those starting years on our preliminary sets of infrastructure can lead to further education around the need for empathy and critical thinking skills.  While those skills were important during the first phase, they will become not only crucial, but crucial to demonstrate, during this, the second phase of our project.  Finding ways to demonstrate recognition of that work and those skills, during the beginning years of Phase II, will set the state for communities with volunteers whose work back during that first phase drew notice, or more importantly, may have gone unnoticed, as those volunteers quietly went about doing the work of putting others into the spotlight, or putting the project ahead of themselves.  Advocating for “Adults for Empathy,” for example, via rides on the metro or Amtrak, must also remember to include recognition for those whose work has gone unseen.  These volunteers could be among the first recognized “Adults” in this project, if those communities are ready to do so.

 

 

 

2. (261/250)

The sets of measurement tools, and the milestones for the early stages for Phase II, should be helpful for recognition of community members who have proven their dedication to building meaningful progress in Human Rights for all of us.  These tools should also, ideally, help to form additional communities around this idea.  Each community should set measureable milestones for what they require of candidates wishing to be recognized as “Adults” in that community.  Activities to meet those criteria can be developed jointly, or even left up to the candidates themselves to propose.  One example might be the organizing and shepherding of a pilgrimage of “Adults for empathy and Human Rights across the USA”  led by some of the volunteers who led the work during Phase I.  Keeping track of some sort of statistical information will be important, most likely, both for the candidates and communities themselves, as well as for the larger public watching these events at the time, and looking back on them from a future date to learn from the experiences.  Increasing the numbers of people from all walks of life who become and remain engaged in the overall project should also be recognized as part of the work of each candidate.  Some of these could even be given in steps, as a smaller part of  recognition of the steps being taken toward becoming a successful candidate in a particular community.  Communities could even start to recognize “Adults” at this stage on voice vote or via social media, with the numbers published to a community and overall project portal.

 

 

 

 

 

3. (253/250)

Again, in the first years of Phase II, the tools and some of the 1-minute activities developed to recognize volunteers who have succeeded in The Adulthood Challenge for a given community must both define that community, and the criteria that community has set forAdulthood.  Walking, as always, is a powerful tool, particularly when used to draw attention to Human Rights.  Using mass transit to build support for human rights, likewise, can be powerful when done creatively, like coordinating “flash mobs” to give recognition to a particular volunteer whose work has contributed to the healthy growth and security of a particular community, for instance.  Social media tools, obviously, are also still an important means of giving recognition to contributors and candidates, and could even be used to publicize the granting of the status of Adult to candidates who consent to this, by any given community.  The participation in and especially organizing work that goes into setting up and running an online or other type of portal or clearing house for sharing community information should not be forgotten in the recognition for volunteers, of course, whether they reach the status of “Adult” or not, in every community working on this project.  Most likely, the criteria for the Adulthood rite of passage candidacy and status, in various communities, will coalesce more tightly as volunteers continue to bond, and as communities continue to work together to define their needs and their resources, while sharing their experiences with other communities involved in this part of the project.

 

 

 

4. (338/250)

In these early years, the purpose, both practical and symbolic, of recognition of having succeeded in passing The Adulthood Challenge within some particular community hinges on commitment.  A community giving its recognition to a candidate of having succeeded in meeting its criteria for this new rite of passage will be showing, among other things, that the candidate has a proven commitment to upholding and promoting the respect for the Human Rights for each and every human being in a practical and useful way.  The practical value of this recognition may only be, at first, that all of the involved parties will now know that there is one more person that we can trust to be able to solve difficult community problems in a practical and empathetic manner.  Symbolically, the importance of this recognition may only play out in terms of an emotional payment of prestige within that community for the candidate.  Yet, this is an important payout, nonetheless.  When one has gone to the time, effort, and sweat to meet the needs of an actual community of people, some sort of recognition is both merited, needed, and also serves to meet the emotional and psycho-social needs of both the newly recognized “Adult” as well as the community itself, and sometimes even also members of the public at large, who are observing this project.  These early years of Phase II have, most likely, not yet seen the full formation of more than a few communities with a well-developed set of prerequisites, criteria for declaring intent to attempt The Challenge, a complete ritual, and heavy responsibilities to those recognized as “Adults” to this point, about 7 years into Phase II, now roughly 25 years into the overall project.  This is about to change, over the next 5 to 7 years, in the later half of Phase II, as understanding grows of how this new rite of passage can help to change our cultural paradigm from one of blaming the other to cooperating with each other to solve our planet’s problems.

 

— (Next Wednesday: Chapter 8, section III. A. )

 

I’m considering this Rough Draft as the block of clay from which my book will eventually emerge, obviously, and some ideas for phases III and IV are still becoming more  fixed in my mind as I write, so the final version will likely look pretty different from this Rough Draft, and will need updating once I get to the very end.

 

And once again, yeayyy( !!)with regard to audience, I may have at least a couple of comps:  Walden Two meets The War on Poverty: A Civilian Perspective (by Dr.s Jean and Edgar Cahn, 1964).  I know that lots of people consider Skinner’s writing to be stilted, but I like the tilt of most reviewers, in that the idea is that a community should keep trying policies that members agree upon until they find what works for all of them.

As for genre, I’m still wondering:  clearly part of  Non-fiction.

  Many thanks to Dr. Garland for suggesting Philosophy

Maybe also: System Change, Causes, maybe even Inspirational, but I doubt it.

Action Items:

1.) Share some ideas you may have on how our society can solve homelessness and child abuse, starting right now,

2.)   Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

   JYP, this photo’s for you!    🙂

Chapter 8   II. and III. E. outlines …

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

Science Fiction/Fantasy Shows, Lupin, or $…

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Do Better (was Baby Floors), Chapter 8, section II. D.: 4/4 of a map for the early years of Phase II

This post  about the Do Better Manifesto records the rough draft of  Chapter 8 of my non-fiction WiP, Baby Floors.   This chapter will begin the early years of mapping out a path to get there for Phase II, with a potential new adulthood rite of passage.

The overall objective remains that of putting a floor on poverty so that each and every baby born can have a safe childhood.

Outlines for chapter 8 will attempt to match with each section, at the bottom of each post.

Once again, by way of disclaimer, the overall goal is now to explain why we need both equ. + justice, & why in 4 phases.  This chapter is part of showing what Phases I-IV could look like as potential roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us.  This vision is laid out in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met, without taking anything from anyone, and without violence, intimidation, nor coercion of any kind. 

(Chapter 8, II. C. was last week…)

II. D

II. D (1339/1000 wds).  The Ritual during the 1st yrs

1. (268/250)

Education and advocacy during the first years of Phase II of this project will likely have had to deal with the difficulties of changing situations, and multiple iterations of different versions of this ritual in each community.  Trial and error, in creating something new, is normal, and a certain amount of ambiguity must be tolerated, at least at first.  Communities should first decide why they want to take on the challenge of designing and testing candidates for a new rite of passage, and what they need and expect from those who pass their requirements, and become recognized asAdults within their communities.  What any given community needs from the Adults in its midst will be driven by the needs of that community, and should thus lead directly to the requirements that community sets for their version of the Adulthood Challenge, and for the rite of passage ritual in that community.  The needs of the community can also be determining factors in who that community will consider, publicly and transparently, as acceptable candidates for adulthood recognition, or for trying The Challenge, within that community.  Clearly, since the needs of every community change over time, as circumstances and times change, the requirements, and what a given community will need and want from its Adults, likewise, will change with time and growth.  Thus every community may find that certain requirements, or candidates who meet certain types of requirements, may be more suitable for their communities.  This can be a reasonable thing, as long as it is all done with full transparency and justification both within and outside of that particular community.

 

 

2. (393/250)

The ritual itself, obviously, will probably be considered the cornerstone of this new modern rite of passage, even if it is merely the showcase, or ceremony, for the result of more than a year’s worth of work, risk, and problem-solving.  The key part of the ritual, as seen from the end goal’s point of view for this rite of passage, is likely to be the person who was taught the difficult but needed life skill by the candidate.  The specific ritual, ceremony, or marker of having passed all of the requirements set by the community in question, must be designed by each particular community based on its own needs and traditions.  The sets of measurement tools, and the milestones for the early stages of this Phase of our project must take into account the fact that these rituals should  grow from small but still public events, to larger, but also public events, never private.  Even the 1-1 tutoring, the private teaching, or Each One Teach One work, which can scale up from groups of 2 people at a time to large groups, must remain safely transparent.  One on one tutoring can be shown in some form during the ritual, if communities wish to see some demonstrable token of how the work was accomplished, for example.  Private teaching techniques, like using the outdoors, or a restaurant setting, to help the learner make the needed real work connections to the material being learned, as with a new language, for instance, can be partly replicated during the ritual, if communities desire to do so.  This may also facilitate scaling up some of the new ideas and tools developed by candidates during their problem-solving time, for use by the larger community and public.  Each One Teach One day in the park, for instance, can come out of such a ritual, and be adapted for libraries and schools, eventually, even becoming E1T1 groups.  Such ideas that begin very small, as part of on candidate’s means of solving a teaching problem for one person can then grow, as with E1T1 community celebrations, or month long events, for example.  Thus, the ritual marking the completion of this new rite of passage can also be used not only to measure the number of Adults recognized, but also to pass on new ideas and tools to be adapted by the larger public.

3. (312/250)

The tools and 1-minute activities of earlier years can also, in Phase II, be adapted and used to aid in designing and promoting the ritual completion of this new modern rite of passage, thus preventing stagnation of tool development, and also preventing the rite of passage from eventually stagnating and falling into obsolescence, itself.  First conceived around 2011, the Teaching Terror ritual, a modern adulthood rite of passage for our time, was imagined as a way both to teach a difficult, significant, absolutely needed life skill to someone as a way of proving one’s persistence, complex thinking, and problem solving skills, and also as a way to show others just how difficult teaching really is.  That idea, it seems, ten years on, has partly fallen into obsolescence itself.  It is now being updated with the intention that every community should adapt this idea to create a ritual for completing the rite of passage that fits the needs of the community and those near it, either geographically or ideologically.  The crucial point is that the requirements for passing this test must be difficult: sufficiently difficult that the candidate, upon succeeding, both knows that the test has been passed, and feels a valid sense of accomplishment upon completing this difficult set of tasks.  In other words, of having proved oneself worthy of that recognition which will follow.  But it is not enough merely to accomplish a difficult thing: that thing must be useful in a very practical way both for the candidate and for the community in which the candidate will become anAdult, if recognized as having passed the requirements.  The accomplishment of something difficult, useful, and significant for all parties involved means that the set of tasks assigned to the candidate must accomplish something needed on both an individual and community level, and the tools for doing this will need continuous updating.

 

4. (343/250)

The usefulness of the tools and activities being developed during this early period of Phase II hinges upon their ability to be both useful and inspiring, serving the practical needs of all parties, while also showing the symbolic connection and importance of the greater community, via the deeper level of the activity.  The tools should also give all candidates the opportunity, as pointed out back in Ch 3, to prove their self-discipline as part of the Adulthood Challenge, always, of course, in an uplifting rather than down-putting fashion, as has been the case in many modern rites of passage involving hazing, such as Rush, pledging, Hell Week at VMI or the last week of Plebe Summer at most service academies, cutting off the T-shirt when student pilots solo, and many other often humiliating traditions in many organizations.  Any set of tasks requiring cooperation, critical thinking, long term planning, and applied personal and social empathy can form the basis for a useful set of requirements, it seems.  But they must also involve deep personal challenge in a useful way, and daring, not merely for the sake of audacity, but to develop the habit of doing the right and needed but difficult thing, even in spite of one’s fear.  They must show perseverance and risk taking skills, in order to demonstrate the ability to keep at difficult tasks and do what may not work, but has a good chance of working and helping for the greater good.  And above all, these tools must show how empathy, both for ‘me and mine’ as well as for persons not part of any of the candidate’s own in-groups, thus both personal empathy and social empathy, forms a deep part of each and every candidate’s character, and give candidates the opportunity to show that empathy in action in meaningful ways for themselves and for the community.  Finally, these tools must help candidates demonstrate their courage, but in the context of a modern set of needed skills that will help both the community and all of humanity to move forward.

 

— (Next Wednesday: Chapter 8, section II. E. )

 

I’m considering this Rough Draft as the block of clay from which my book will eventually emerge, obviously, and some ideas for phases III and IV are still becoming more  fixed in my mind as I write, so the final version will likely look pretty different from this Rough Draft, and will need updating once I get to the very end.

 

Action Items:

1.) Share some ideas you may have on how our society can solve homelessness and child abuse, starting right now,

2.) .) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

   JYP, this photo’s for you!  🙂

Chapter 8 ch8D  II. and III. D. outlines …

 

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Click here to read, if you like:

Science Fiction/Fantasy Shows, or Lupin

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Do Better, Chapter 8, section II. C.: 3/4 of a map for the early years of Phase II

This post is the  rough draft of  Chapter 8 of my non-fiction WiP,  Do Better, fka Baby Floors.   This chapter will begin the early years of mapping out a path to get there for Phase II, with a potential new adulthood rite of passage.

Project Do Better needs eyes on the above linked book, but is leaving the original rough material here for comparison, at the request of followers interested in this writing process, and for full transparency.

The overall objective remains that of putting a floor on poverty so that each and every baby born can have a safe childhood.

Outlines for chapter 8 will attempt to match with each section, at the bottom of each post.

Once again, by way of disclaimer, the overall goal is now to explain why we need both equ. + justice, & why in 4 phases.  This chapter is part of showing what Phases I-IV could look like as potential roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us.  This vision is laid out in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met, without taking anything from anyone, and without violence, intimidation, nor coercion of any kind. 

(Chapter 8, II. B. was last week…)

II. C

II. C (1355/1000 wds).  What is the use and why undergo The Challenge, especially during the 1st and earliest yrs

1. (274/250)

Education and advocacy during the first years of Phase II of this project will likely have to deal with what looks like Trouble to many both inside and outside of River City, at first glance.  The form this takes will need to be suited to conditions in each and every particular community.  There will be benefits, even at these early stages, of preparing for and undergoing The Challenge, even in the case where a candidate does not succeed in fully passing the requirements for that specific community where the candidate applied forAdulthood recognition.  First and foremost, the formation of anadult teaching community has the potential to drive freer worship for all of us, as we participate in the pondering and debate around the meaning and responsibility of adulthood for our society.  Having a growing group of peaceful and self-disciplined volunteers committed to comprehensive cultural change in favor of full Human Rights for all of us can be facilitated by this part of the project, merely through its presence.  Discussion around a new rite of passage may help thinking people to find each other, and to contribute to the sets of ideas, advocacy tools, and action items needed by the project and by our society.  This work toward comprehensive change will need a set of tools, a timeline, and a cohort of willing workers, in order to be taken up by the next generation, who can usher it into birth and completion.  This challenge idea is one of the standards around which a variety of interested people can gather, and can help to find like minded souls and form processes for future generations.

 

 

2. (341/250)

The sets of measurement tools, and the milestones for the early stages of this Phase of our project, will be more nebulous, by definition, than those of the previous Phase.  We will be going from the creation, out of nearly whole cloth, of a new rite of passage for our diverse society, to attempting, at this point in the process, to figure out what to measure, and how.  At this point in our overall project vision for society, there are few rewards, and possibly many risks for those willing to embark on the adventure of building a new mechanism for proving oneself capable of pushing through a set of complex modern problems requiring a holistic solution.  It could be argued that there is a large risk of failure, of loss of face, but, is there, really?  Not so, can be the answer, for those who see the value of contributing to a shared endeavor in whatever way is best suited for each individual, and for the larger community.  This new rite of passage will not be meant for every person, nor will there be any shame or loss for those unwilling to undergo The Challenge.  But there is always a set of human beings feeling the need to test themselves, and to this set of people, the appeal for a new way of doing so is directed.  Throwing down the gauntlet to build something new.  Starting a new thing, especially when it involves changing the dominant paradigms, is never easy, is always a risk, and will always take the efforts, courage, and faith of the most intrepid souls.  Earnestly attempting to take up the gauntlet and try this Challenge is tantamount to gaining the respect of a community of siblings in arms working for peace, for long term change, and for building a set of connected systems that ensure respect for the Human Rights of every person.  Taking up this gauntlet shows dedication to a cause greater than ourselves, and shows determination to be part of the solution to Humanity’s problems.

 

 

3. (383/250)

The tools and 1-minute activities of earlier years in Phase II, just after finishing the infrastructure building of Phase I, with the quite possibly wearying fights to get funding for common goods, may seem a bit of an anti-climax by comparison.  But the new definition of Adult that this project proposes is one of constant commitment to Humanity, and to actively helping with the task of building tools, and of dedicating our skills, talents, and our lives, to the service of humanity, time and time again.  Thus the tools developed for this part of our task must be designed to demonstrate and remind us all, constantly, that Adulthood is a commitment to Humanity, and an agreement to lay our abilities, our intelligences, our time, at the feet of a greater good for all of society, even up to the global level.  These tools and 1-minute activities, like 1-minute tightrope walking in the park, for random passers by (space to explain from at Uni. of Bath??) , by building a little bit of camaraderie at a time, a little bit of friendship at a time, a little bit of confidence in both someone’s core muscles, and in someone’s ability to learn a new thing in just one minute, also show our commitment to long term thinking and teaching every human being, regardless of personal cost.  Setting up a tight rope to show a few others how to walk a tight rope may cost only a few hours, but sets a precedent for teaching random strangers, and ripples along into their lives as well.  Such benefits in these early stages can be the formation of a core group of Adults and connected people pledged to the Cause of Kindness, and of HumanKind.  The solutions to our problems lies in long term thinking and in finding ways to continue the process of holistic problem-solving over an extended period of years.  As the framers of the Declaration of Independence of the USA pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor, to the cause of shaping a nation free from the abuses of the former empire, so can we now pledge our lives, our skills, and our creative talents to this long term endeavor, to free all of humanity, eventually, from the abuses of our former unjust system.

 

 

4. (324/250)

The usefulness of the tools and activities being developed during this early period of Phase II must strive to be twofold, serving the practical needs of both those wanting to teach, those needing to be taught, and the larger community, while also showing the importance of the greater lesson that we all need to learn regarding our need for critical thinking with empathy.  The purpose, practically speaking, of the earlier suggestions for prerequisites, will be as both preparation for the curve balls life throws at all of us, via long term thinking and problem solving.  But perhaps more importantly, those prerequisites also serve to illuminate and symbolize the importance of the kind of holistic thinking needed to solve complex problems.  Teaching is a way of meeting the need to demonstrate empathy, cooperative thinking, complex problem solving with other people, and of course, providing a needed skill to the one being taught.  But the act of teaching also symbolizes the fact that “help is here,” to paraphrase President Biden.  For this reason, any requirement to put in a certain number of hours volunteering at a shelter, dog pound, hospital or even in a school, as with Bar/Bat Mitzvah project requirements, and high school community service requirements, misses the mark.  It is neither the same, nor sufficient, to put in a number of hours helping others, nor is the very real enthusiasm for helping vulnerable members of the community sufficient.  The requirement of being able to solve difficult problems together by planning and implementing a solution, or set of solutions, and then evaluate the outcomes to adjust and if needed, try other solutions until the problem is solved, are at the heart of this new rite of passage.  The core of the idea is to find practical ways solve the complex problems which stand in the way of human dignity, and to build solutions that serve the principle of Human Rights for every human being.

 

— (Next Wednesday: Chapter 8, section II. D. )

 

I’m considering this Rough Draft as the block of clay from which my book will eventually emerge, obviously, and some ideas for phases III and IV are still becoming more  fixed in my mind as I write, so the final version will likely look pretty different from this Rough Draft, and will need updating once I get to the very end.

 

There have been some substantial changes to this chapter in the last several drafts.

 

Action Items:

1.) Share some ideas you may have on how our society can solve homelessness and child abuse, starting right now.

   JYP, this photo is for you!  🙂

Chapter 8   II. and III. C. outlines …

 

.

 

*****************

Click here to read, if you like:

Narrative and Prose Nonfiction,

Holistic High School Lessons,

           or Historical Fiction Serial Stories

Shira

Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.