Tag Archives: Bible

Sacred Study Saturdays, flaming swords, and writing a novel

It’s still Preptober, with only 15 more days to go before the start of NaNoWriMo!

I’m not ready to write my novel! I need to finish researching, and this week’s portion has my favorite fantasy item that goes into my novel!

It is the end of the first week of the new Torah study cycle, Parashat Bereshit!

Since my synagogue (as most, if not all, Masorti/Conservative movement shuls now do) follows the Triennial Torah reading cycle, rather than the Annual cycle, so now it takes us three years to read the entire Torah, rather than just one.  I still sort of miss the Annual (Full) cycle, but I also admit that it is much easier to keep up with when doing other work.

This week, the Bible again, from the beginning:

October 10, 2020 –

 

page 22
 

1.41% “Genesis 2:19 recalls the famous Rabbi who carried a note in each pocket, 1 of which read:
עפר אני
I’m dust”

 
October 14, 2020 –

 

page 22
 

1.41%“Gen 2:20-25, naming, sleep, rib, and naming again: All by the man…”

 
October 15, 2020 –

 

page 22
 

1.41% “5th reading of Parashat Bereshit:
וַיְגָ֖רֶשׁ אֶת־הָֽאָדָ֑ם וַיַּשְׁכֵּן֩ מִקֶּ֨דֶם לְגַן־עֵ֜דֶן אֶת־הַכְּרֻבִ֗ים וְאֵ֨ת לַ֤הַט הַחֶ֙רֶב֙ הַמִּתְהַפֶּ֔כֶת לִשְׁמֹ֕ר אֶת־דֶּ֖רֶךְ עֵ֥ץ הַֽחַיִּֽים׃
So after banishing the man, who lived east of the garden, The Chruvim and the The Ever-Turning Flaming Sword guard the way/road to the Tree of Life.
Interesting that the commentary asserts that The Sword must have been known”

 

So, it turns out that this week contains part, a fun and interesting part, of the inspiration for my WiP.  I love it when my writing coincides with my curiosity interests, like history and languages. The struggle becomes not to get too far into the research and forget to write!

That sword is not held by any angel, person, nor Cherub, but turns on its own, and was apparently a known magical or spiritual object in the ancient Mesopotamian world. That is all I’ve been able to find about the Ever-Turning Flaming Sword, so I guess that gives me plenty of leeway for my characters to ‘find’ information about it… 

More on my continuing striving with Biblical tales next week, friends:

Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different sources to translate the word “sword” into Hebrew.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how you like each of the resources you found,  perhaps as an update on your GoodReads reading,

4.) Write a blog post or tweet that uses a Hebrew word, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Dear Readers, any additional ideas toward learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning as part of on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

ShiraDest

Preptober for NaNoWriMo 2020 CE

October, 2020 CE = 12020 HE

(The previous lesson plan since this post, and the most recent lesson plan…)

Great Greek Wednesdays and skimpy study

Here is where I am in my study of written Greek this week!

My notes thus far:

 

I did the written activity first, then watched the first video on half speed, and updated my progress on GR:

October 12, 2020 –

 

page 1
 

1.1%“First video on formal introduction seems curt.”

 
October 6, 2020 –

 

page 1
 

1.1% “Read transcript for first video, which is very easy: a simple introduction with formal and plural explained.”

and then, from the Bible:
October 12, 2020 –

 

Then, looking again into the oldest translation of the oldest book, aka The Book, aka the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible (though this is still apparently a more updated version, called Katharevousa, of the ancient Greek, rather than the Greek of 300BCE…):

1.0% “Still on verse 1: Why not “Stin Archizo?”

 

I also had another very quick look at Genesis 1:1 in the Septuagint (aka the LXX), but am too tired to work on the Ancient Greek this week. More on my continuing striving with modern and ancient Greek next week, friends:

Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different resources to translate the word “tomorrow” into Greek.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how you like each of the resources you found,  perhaps as an update on your GoodReads reading,

4.) Write a blog post or tweet that uses a modern Greek word, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Dear Readers, any additional ideas toward learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning as part of on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

ShiraDest

October, 12020 HE

(The previous lesson plan since this post, and the most recent lesson plan…)

Sacred Study Saturdays,study slacking, and what’s the Bible got to do with change, anyway?

Don’t get me wrong, I am not a true believer, but I find the biblical era and languages fascinating, as well as so ingrained in Western culture that it is important to understand on a more than cursory level. So, I slack off, but I always end up coming back, because I think that understanding what shapes our culture(s) is a crucial step in understanding how to change our paradigms from competition and individual importance to cooperation and and serving the community.

Here is where I am in my study of Biblical Hebrew this week!

I’ve nearly given up on this year’s Torah study cycle, finishing the end of the book of Deuteronomy, and looking forward to restarting Genesis shortly.

My notes thus far:

October 9, 2020 –

page 1194
 

76.59% “Back to the last Parashah of the year, Parashat Haazinu. After finishing the last of many warnings, Moshe Rabbeinu is summoned to his permanent rest, whether he wants to or not. The Rabbis say he passed on with a kiss from the creator.”

  More on my continuing striving with Bible study next week, friends:

Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different resources to translate the word “morning” into Hebrew.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how you like each of the resources you found,  perhaps as an update on your GoodReads reading,

4.) Write a blog post or tweet that uses a Hebrew word, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Dear Readers, any additional ideas toward learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning as part of on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

(The previous lesson plan since this post, and the most recent lesson plan…)

Sacred Study Saturdays, and the first days of Sukkot, 5781!!

So,  I’m behind in my Torah/Bible study, but I did find the one day (out of my planned 7) of study this week fascinating:

My Sukkot reading study thus far:

 

September 27, 2020 –

page 723
 

46.38% “Looking at the first day of Sukkot reading this, actually I have to recheck and see if first 28 is part of it because I think it starts at first 29, however it catches my attention at the bottom of the page the commentary says you are not allowed to sacrifice an animal and kid on the same day. So that we don’t become accustomed to practicing cruelty. Nice.”

 

So, it turns out that pain being expressed by any being is important, whether that pain is ‘real’ or not, much, I suppose, like Thomas Jefferson said (in his Notes on the State of Virginia, I believe?) that slavery degrades both the slave and the slave holder.   More on my continuing striving with Biblical Hebrew next week, friends:

Chag Sameach!!

Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different resources to translate the word “Hello” into Hebrew.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how you like each of the resources you found,  perhaps as an update on your GoodReads reading,

4.) Write a blog post or tweet that uses a Hebrew word, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Dear Readers, any additional ideas toward learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning as part of on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

Shira

Tishrei, 5781

October, 12020 HE

(The previous lesson plan since this post, and the most recent lesson plan…)

Libraries and Language learning on Moody Mondays, from FORTRAN to Python! And may we all be Inscribed for a Good New Year, 5781. Shannah Tovah (Happy New Year 5781)

Ask Tamar, Ruth, and Scheherazade.  Even ladies in the Bible had to learn new languages, and sometimes, languages as ancient as FOTRAN or old Hebrew, to as new as Python or modern Arabic, hold the key to successfully charting a course in new waters.

רֶגַע… Rega… Wait, you say:
Scheherazade is not in the Bible, she is from the Thousand and One Nights, originally in Arabic, or maybe partly in Persian, but certainly not in Hebrew;
This, you remember!

Ok, point taken, her book was not in Hebrew, but Arabic is a sister language.  More on this shortly…

Tamar was a Canaanite woman, and so had to learn Hebrew, or Judah’s dialect of Hebrew at the very least.
Ruth, a native of Moab, had to learn the Hebrew of the time of her mother-in-law, Naomi.
Scheherazade, at the palace, had to learn the hardest languages of all: the languages of heartbreak, of story, and of love.

So, you see, returning to those sister languages, Scheherazade’s story, in one Semitic language, really is the same as that of her Biblical sisters, in another Semitic language: she was a clever lady faced with a survival situation in a man’s world. And she, like her sisters, had to learn a language in order to survive.

Each one of these ladies had to live by her wits in difficult times, and to use the tools available to her at that time. Nowadays, they would surely go together to the Public Library to learn to use the power of modern tools like computers and smartphones, especially using Unix to navigate this new world.   In the here and now, any one of us can learn a bit of a language to pass on to another young woman, helping her to succeed.  Any language will do, whether it is a natural language, like Hebrew or Arabic, or a programming language, like FORTRAN or Python.   Either way, libraries, online or physical, are a key of help and hope for finding this information.  And as they succeeded then, so could we all succeed again, using adaptability, daring, and hope.

Hope for us all.

Action Item:

1.)  Check out a book on coding in any language from your Public Library,

2.)      …find the first “Hello World” page, and  try it out yourself, and then

3.)      …share it with a friend!

4.)  … or, just write a story about a strong lady who has to learn some new skill in order to adapt to difficult or dangerous circumstances?  🙂

Let’s #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail starting by improving these four parts of our good #PublicDomainInfrastructure:
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare , and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !


#PublicDomainInfrastructure #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19
ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

image: By Wikimedia – Wikimedia commons, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=55282489

Sacred Study Saturdays

Since tomorrow night begins Yom Kippur, I’ve been a bit lacking, ironically, on my study of Biblical Hebrew, this week!  I foolishly agreed to chant online (and as a kinesthetic learner, I use hand-signs to learn my portion, so I can’t just listen to a recording…) in a few weeks, without having ever set up or used Zoom on my system, so I’m now scrambling to do all of my studying while setting up  all of my upcoming blog posts ahead of time, and then figuring out glitches on my very old hardware!  So, you’ll see that I have missed some of the readings (if we study one reading each day, with Sunday being the first, to Friday being the 6th, leaving the 7th reading for Saturday itself, just before the reading of the entire portion in services, or of 1/3 of the weekly portion under the Triennial System).  I love the fact that the Annual Cycle and the Triennial cycle are the same, in these last few weeks of the Hebrew calendar year.  I’m still having trouble adjusting to the Triennial cycle, but I can see why it was adopted.  Some days, though, it doesn’t seem like enough verses to bite into, but other days it is a life-saver!

So, here is what I was able to study last week (Parashat HaAzinu, which ended yesterday):

My notes thus far in the Etz Haim Masorti chumash:

 
The 6th reading, Friday, 25th of September, 2020:          Shira Jones is on page 1193 of 1559

 

Interesting commentary on verse 43, last stanza:
“וְכִפֶּ֥ר אַדְמָת֖וֹ עַמּֽוֹ׃”
points out that a known variant of Admato (it’s land/the people’s land) is the Ugaritic d’maot as the people’s tears
(given that both languages are consonant-based…)

2 minutes ago

Etz Hayim: Torah and Commentary
Shira Jones is on page 1189 of 1559

 

4 Aliyah: lest you say we did this with our hands lifting up the work of our hands, and take undue credit? -check translation…

24 sept. 00:18

Etz Hayim: Torah and Commentary
Shira Jones is on page 1189 of 1559

 

v. 32:13-18 today, Tuesday 3rd Aliyah: I love the start of this parashah, Parashat HaAzinu (Give Ear…): once again, Moshe Rabeinu is calling the people a bunch of hard-headed clods, to say ‘Listen up, guys!’
and at the end of today’s Aliyah/reading, warns (in the past tense): You forgot the teachings of your parents, while at the start, 2nd (yesterday’s) Aliyah: ask your parents, and they will tell you!

22 sept. 23:29

 

So, it turns out that related languages, like Ugaritic, are often used to clarify words in the Ancient Hebrew that are possible scribal errors, or words that only appear one time in the Biblical text.  More on that after I look up that word I’ve forgotten for ‘a word that only appears one time in the Bible‘ if anyone is interested next week, friends:

May we all be Sealed for a Good Year ! 

Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different resources to find that word I mentioned above, please.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how you found each of the resources, and where you found them,  perhaps with an update on your GoodReads list?

4.) Write a blog post or tweet that uses a Hebrew word, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Dear Readers, any additional ideas toward learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning as part of on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

Looking for a partner in time… to write new cultural commentaries!

This post is a whim, completely off focus and off topic, so please forgive me: I’ll be back on my winding track, as I continue to make my blog more straight and narrow, shortly. But for this moment…

Who doesn’t dream of the perfect partner: a soul mate, that one person on this planet with whom you mesh completely, who gets you, and whom you also get and complete? Who can finish your sentences, and even re-write them better than you first wrote them?!

I write to rewrite my story. I study the sacred texts, particularly in Hebrew, and I plan also one day to learn them in Arabic, for guidance on how to rewrite my story. I also look to Rumi, to Octavia, to Olivares and to Betüş. But the Bible is my native culture’s foundational text, and so I must learn first how my origins have shaped me, and thus how to reshape my future.

Then, I look to other influences for signs of what has been, what might have been, and what could yet become.

Anyone care to join me?

I’m using Biblical and other sacred sources.

#PublicDomainInfrastructure #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19
ShiraDest

Great Greek Wednesdays, in European Spanish

Since I’ve been a bit lacking on my study of written Greek this week, I must fall back on my study of modern Greek, via video!

So, now my spoken modern Greek is progressing, but I’m still struggling to find films that are slow enough to understand at the very early levels of modern Greek.  I did find some materials by the Hellenic American Union, which I’ll have to dig through my paper notes to get, so if there are interested replies in the comments here, I’ll post that material for next Wednesday.

My notes thus far:

Someone asked how to form the infinitive in modern Greek, since, well… there is none!

-Una pregunta, Juanjo. Si en griego moderno no existe el infinitivo, ¿cómo podría traducir del español un verbo que actúa como sujeto al griego? Por ejemplo, si quiero traducir “el caminar es bueno” o “fumar es malo para la salud”, ¿cómo sería?

Tienes dos opciones: puedes usar el verbo dirigido a una persona o usar un sustantivo. Por ejemplo, para “el caminar es bueno” puede decirlo… – Το να περπατήσεις είναι καλό (Literalmente, El que tú andes es bueno), siempre dirigiéndolo a alguien. – Το περπάτημα είναι καλό (Literalmente, El hecho de andar/la acción de andar es buena). Una de las ventajas del Griego Moderno es que puedes crear sustantivos de prácticamente todos los verbos. Pero básicamente la estructura del infinitivo es esa.

 

So, even the comments, it turns out, are interesting, in Juanjo’s videos!   More on my continuing striving with both LXX and modern Greek next week, friends:

Yassas,   γεια σας

Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different resources to translate the word “Hello” into Greek.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how you like each of the resources you found,  perhaps as an update on your GoodReads reading,

4.) Write a blog post or tweet that uses a Greek word, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Let’s #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail and support these four key parts of our #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !

ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

Great Greek Wednesdays, and it’s already Saint Sophia’s day in Greece!

Since 2pm PDT is midnight, Athens time, it is now Thursday, September 17th, dedicated to a martyr who tried, as many oppressed parents try, to protect her children: Saint Sophia’s name day is on September 17th, meaning that Greeks around the world who carry the name Sophia are already beginning to celebrate their name days: Happy Name Day, Sophia(s)!!

So, now I see that my study of ancient Greek, with the goal of reading the Septuagint, maybe in slightly more updated Greek than the ancient Rabbinical translation that earned it the name “The LXX,” but still, not quite modern Greek.  The form of Greek that seems to be used for this version of the Greek Old Testament is Koine, the same Greek used in New Testament times.  My modern Greek, below these notes, is coming along a bit faster!  Many libraries, and any Greek orthodox church, will have copies of the LXX, or a more modern Bible version in Greek.

My notes thus far:

1.0%“Verse 1, word 3: still adds the prefix ‘ε, but how do the breathing marks work?”
 
September 9, 2020 –

 

 

1.0% “Είναι καθαρεύουσα. It’s Katharevousa.”

 

So, it turns out that a slightly more modern version of ancient Greek, known to Biblical scholars as Koine Greek, is what seems to have been used for this version of the LXX.  Koine is the New Testament time period, and was about 600 years after the initial Rabbinical translation by the 70 rabbis of legend, in 300BC, for the Jews of Alexandria.   The breathing marks and some of the ancient suffixes are there, enough to make it impossible for me to use my Modern Greek classes to pronounce this form of ancient Greek, but a Greek friend informs me that the published versions that I’ve found online via an LXX app are not the ancient version, since he can still understand it.  More on my continuing striving with both LXX and modern Greek next week, friends:

Yassas,   γεια σας

Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Download some public domain version of your favorite book!

2.) Read a page,

3.) Share your thoughts on that page, perhaps as an update on your GoodReads reading,

4.) Write a novel that references a classic book, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Let’s #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail and support these four key parts of our #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !

ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

Sunday Study: Learning languages to see for yourself…

I’m currently starting to study this week’s Torah portion: Parashat Ha’azinu (actually, this week has no parashah, since this coming Shabbat is Rosh HaShannah, which has it’s own readings…).

Last week’s parashah, Netzavim-Vayelech, contains some of the most beautiful verses in all of Torah, as far as I am concerned. The 4th Aliyah/reading is one of my favorite to Leyn (read from the Torah scroll at synagogue, when not in a global pandemic…): that from all of the corners of the earth, you shall be gathered. Who that you is, or how, or to where (metaphorical, etc), while reading the passage, becomes irrelevant for the moment. The sheer hope and beauty of the verses is incredible.

–Surprised that Parashat Netzavim-Vayelech Rishon is only 3 psukim even in a double Parashah year.” September 6, 2020 – page 1165 74.73% “#TorahStudy Seems like a more specific set of people convoked/included in the address to the assembly, on this day: even down to the lowest water drawer, who was a foreigner impressed into service…” September 7, 2020 – page 1166 74.79% “Est this covenant with its penalties with those who are here and with those who are not here this day:. Is that legal?” September 8, 2020 – page 1166 74.79% “Commentary on verse 14: “… accepting …as facts… rather than…”

And why is there no option to change those facts?” September 9, 2020 – page 1169 74.98% “4: אני אוהבת את העליה הזות, הרביית של פרשת מצבים-ויליח !
I love the 4th Aliyah of this Parashah (Nitzavim-VaYeleich)!

(But, why can I not find the terminal Chaf on Google keyboard?)

September 10, 2020 – page 1170 75.05% “Lots of rejoicing because of returning…” September 12, 2020 – page 1171 75.11% “לא ניפלאת היא (הוא)…לא בשמים…ולא מעבר הים!!
I love this: it’s not a mystery, it’s not in the heavens, and it’s not over the seas!!

The Sixth Aliyah is the epitome of “It’s not that difficult…”
And, of course, the 7th Aliyah: “choose life…”
on page 1172.

I have always been fascinated by the stories of the Hebrew Bible, as well as by the way those stories are seen by people around the world, especially around the Mediterranean. For me, understanding only comes through investigation, and so I must read writing in the original language, ancient Hebrew in this case, to get a feel for my thoughts around the writing.

I am very very thankful that we have libraries, the internet, and kind people who lend their time and talents to teach us and encourage all of us to learn and to wonder. Please join me in wondering, and in learning to build a more hopeful world.

Books, film, and other forms of media, like comic books, aka graphic novels, and music all have a strong effect on how people view the world. So, here are some Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Download some public domain version of a classic book, or grab your favorite version of the Bible,

2.) Read a page,

3.) Share your thoughts on that page, perhaps as an update on your GoodReads reading,

4.) Write a novel that references a classic book, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Other ideas welcome on how to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail, starting with improving these four parts of our good #PublicDomainInfrastructure:

1. #libraries,

2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,

3. #UniversalHealthCare, and

4. good #publictransport

Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !

#PublicDomainInfrastructure #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19 ShiraDest

Sunday, 13 September, 12020 HE

(but scheduled on Sunday, 6 September, a week ahead of time…)