Tag Archives: health

Parashat Re’eh, and Self Health Care

 

Parashat Re’eh / פרשת רְאֵה

 

I taught a class on this parashah at the DC Beit Midrash, some years ago, as a follow up to the previous year’s class on a different parashah.   Since I schedule my posts ahead, I will be away (mostly) from the internet all weekend, concentrating on clearing paper notes from my desk for my own mental health. 

May we all find healthy and inclusive community.

I will be taking off tomorrow, so our usual Sunday GED class post will resume next week.

Last week was: Parashat Eikev (עֵקֶב) 5782, and Carrots And Sticks  ;

Action Items:

1.) Share your thoughts on how community can help, or hinder, inclusive thinking,

Shira

 

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Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan: Muhafiz/The Protector, Sihirli Annem,  Lupin, or La Casa de Papel/Money Heist Reviews

Holistic College Algebra & GED/High School Lesson Plans,

Thoughtful Readers, please consider reading about #ProjectDoBetter.

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

 
 

ShiraDest

Why Health Care and Science Education Matter

I was shocked that anyone might not know what CO was: So this is what educational priv. looks like, and why Science Ed Matters?

Thanks for the local investigative reporting, NPR and ProPublica.
Shira

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Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan: Muhafiz/Protector,  Lupin, or La Casa de Papel/Money Heist Reviews

Holistic College Algebra & GED/High School Lesson Plans,

Thoughtful Readers, please consider reading about #ProjectDoBetter.

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Parashat Emor / פָּרָשַׁת אֱמוֹר, What Authority Stands For

     This week’s Torah portion,  Emor,  is the 31st (31/54 or 52, depending on the year: this year, it’s 54…) reading in the annual cycle, and the 8th parashah in the book of Vayikra/Leviticus.

   This portion ( Leviticus 21:1-24:23 ) has examples of a central authority and their expected behavior, not to mention their care and feeding, and the representative structure of their authority:  the Mishkan (aka The Tabernacle).  The parashah also details some of the use of that authority for gathering purposes, and an example of the enforcement of said authority.

    Several thousand years, and a new nation, ago, such hierarchies were not uncommon ways of establishing the rule of law.  Common laws and norms, indeed, are necessary for us to live together.  But, now that we have advanced to the point where most (%90 of males, john_hancock_envelope_signature    & 82.7 of females, per UNESCO as of 2019),  human beings are literate, perhaps such trappings around the rule of law are less needed.

         What do you think our world could look like if every one of us learned, taught, and followed the empathetic rule of law? 

     I look forward to hearing your opinions on this matter, Thoughtful Readers.

We can really  Do Better.

-Shira   

 

     Last week was: Parashat Kedoshim, What Torah Stands Upon ,

Action Prompts:

    Share your thoughts on how to build buy-in create a more equal, or at least less inequitable, society, please.   Writing, by the way, is my personal contribution to Project Do Better

What would yours be, if you had time?

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan:Muhafiz/The Protector, Lupin, or La Casa De Papel/Money Heist Reviews,

Holistic High School Lessons,

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BsCs

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Continue reading Parashat Emor / פָּרָשַׁת אֱמוֹר, What Authority Stands For

Parashat Kedoshim, What Torah Stands Upon

     This week’s Torah portion,  K’doshim,  is the 30th (30/54 or 52, depending on the year: this year, it’s 54…) reading in the annual cycle, and the 7th parashah in the book of Vayikra/Leviticus.

   This portion has the verse from which Rabbi Hillel draws his famous order to the prospective convert wanting to learn Torah while standing on one foot:

  “That which is hateful to you, do not do to your Neighbor.  On this hangs the whole Torah; the rest is commentary: go learn it.”

  (Sorry, I’m too tired to quote the original src from which this comes, but here is a lovely article which does cite Hillel, and this parshah’s verse which R. Hillel was using as the basis for his order to the man, who did, apparently, go on to convert to Judaism, if I recall correctly.  Hopefully Dolly or David will read this and correct me if I’m mis-remembering…)  

         What do you think our world could look like if every one of us followed the order given by Rabbi Hillel? 

     I look forward to hearing your opinions on this matter, Thoughtful Readers.

We can really  Do Better.

-Shira   

 

     Last week was: Parashat Acharei Mot, Mourning, and Caring for Each Other ,

Action Prompts:

    Share your thoughts on how to build buy-in create a more equal, or at least less inequitable, society, please.   Writing, by the way, is my personal contribution to Project Do Better

What would yours be, if you had time?

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan:Muhafiz/The Protector, Lupin, or La Casa De Papel/Money Heist Reviews,

Holistic High School Lessons,

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BsCs

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Continue reading Parashat Kedoshim, What Torah Stands Upon

Parashat Acharei Mot, Mourning, and Caring for Each Other

     This week’s Torah portion,  Acharei Mot (After the Death of…),  is the 29th (29th/54 or 52, depending on the year: this year, it’s 54…) through the annual cycle, and the 6th parashah in the book of Vayikra/Leviticus.

   This portion deals with preventing tragedies like that of the two sons of Aaron last regular parashah ( Parashat Metzorah), and also lists prohibitions on certain things that now seem pretty obvious, and give us much of our Western Cultural ideas.  For example “the life of the flesh is in the blood,” and not sleeping with your daughter-in-law.  All of these prohibitions suggest a way of reasoning that leads to the idea that caring about others, and for others, is the basis of a functioning society.  From caring for the animals whose lives meat-eaters take in order to feel nourished, to caring for the feelings of those close to our families, who must not be allowed to be violated via a technicality.   

         What could equity of responsibility and citizenry look like, if every person had proper health care, and everyone had a safe home? 

  I look forward to hearing your thoughts on this matter, Thoughtful Readers.

We can really  Do Better.

-Shira   

 

          Parashat Metzorah, Healing Houses, and Caring for People was the week before Pesach (which ended last week…)

and

   Next week (Parasha 30) will be: Parashat Kedoshim, What Torah Stands Upon ,

Action Prompts:

    Share your thoughts on how to build buy-in create a more equal, or at least less inequitable, society, please.   Writing, by the way, is my personal contribution to Project Do Better

What would yours be, if you had time?

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan:Muhafiz/The Protector, Lupin, or La Casa De Papel/Money Heist Reviews,

Holistic High School Lessons,

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BsCs

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Continue reading Parashat Acharei Mot, Mourning, and Caring for Each Other

Freedom (and still French) Fridays for Truth and Reconciliation via Empathy

It’s nearly the end of Passover, so share your stories of Freedom, please. I tried to incorporate some untold stories into the tours I developed in DC.

First, some suggestions for every Community College or Continuing Education campus below, that I consider part of the processes of repairing some part of the damage done by slavery:

1.) a small library or study area, for students with no quiet home,

2.) workshops given by recent local graduates, to mentor current students,
3.) an on-site nurse paid for by medicaid, and
4.) access to public transportation, such as shuttles between campuses,

Now, the tours.

Since I’ve been a bit lacking on my study of  Language this week, I must fall back on my study of tours in DC, from 2011!

2011-10-27 19:11:00
“The Ghosts of Slave Pens Past!” walking tour of DC
Join me, licensed DC Tour Guide Shira D. Jones, as we walk past places that recall the Dickensionan horrors of Victorian era jails, but with inmates whose only crime was being born to the wrong mother -a slave.

This unique Black History related tour of downtown DC will focus on places long forgotten, but which should never be forgotten. Dress for the weather and to walk!

Tours on a sliding scale.
Peace!
(This tour drew very little interest…)

My notes thus far:

Slave pens are important.
No one knew that one slave pen was where the FAA building was, and that the DC City Jail was essentially used as a free slave pen.

So, it turns out that history matters, after all: but here is a ray of hope in the form of a manumission manumission_of_slave2c_francois2c_by_auguste_chouteau2c_signed_aug._chouteau2c_henry_chouteau2c_and_t.f._smith2c_september_262c_1826  letter…

Action Items in support of   hope that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different resources to locate slave pens or locations that coffles may have passed by in your area.

2.) Share your thoughts on how you like each of the resources you found,

3.) Write a book, story, blog post, or tweet that discusses slavery.

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Click here to read, if you like:

B5, La Casa De Papel/Money Heist, & Lupin & Hakan: Muhafiz/The Protector Reviews

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Review: Las Puertas del Mal, and Health Care

A very interesting book from a fascinating series. This one really pointed up, in a medieval sort of way, the importance of mental health care for children who’ve undergone trauma at an early age. Yet the book, like the Harry Potter books, only more medieval European, is entertaining and uplifting, mostly.

Las Puertas del Mal by Núria Masot

Intelligent (but possibly codependent) women able to face danger, oddly dressed polyglotts who inspire fear but actually protect, PTSD shown, not told, wounded veterans reminding each other who they were and remain over the years, the seeds of hatred and the power of loyalty, even between different communities. Those are the good things this fourth book offers. What annoyed me was the move toward semi-mystical solutions, rather than logic, in this book versus the first two books. Still, excellent inter-generational work that, like Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix and the entire Harry Potter series, inspires hope in community.

17 August, 12015 HE (Holocene Era)

So, it turns out that reading authors from other countries is fun, and useful!

Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different resources on PTSD.

2.) Share your thoughts on how novels can help build empathy, and hope for kids with PTSD (or C-PTSD).

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Click here to read, if you like:

B5, La Casa De Papel/Money Heist, & Lupin & Hakan: Muhafiz/The Protector Reviews

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, please consider reading about   #ProjectDoBetter.

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Turkish Tuesdays, Happiness vs. Meaning, and Health vs. Home?

         When I lived in Izmir, a neighbor asked me one day:

Doydun yerin nerede?

 

Literally, this means, where is your full place

   She was asking me where is the place that makes me feel full, or happy.

   What I could not explain to her then, back in 2005, which some blogging friends have recently reminded me to point out, is that contentment, far more than happiness, is a stable emotion, rather than a fleeting feeling based on dopamine or serotonin, and it requires a larger context.  That context is built out of a life that renders service.  A life, for me, that builds tools and leaves a scaffolding upon which others may continue to build, to create the equitable world that would be safe, kind, and respectful of the dignity and potential of every human being born into this world, is a happy one.  

The common good, or the general welfare, in the United States, tends to presume that “the pursuit of happiness” is the good and the goal of life.  Yet those of us descended from enslaved people know that our ancestors, and often ourselves, as well, have not been free to follow that pursuit, and thus have been forced to define happiness in a different way.

True it is, that happiness is a part of one’s overall health.  But it requires having a safe home, first.  Access to affordable and comprehensive health care is also a major part of it: freedom from the stress of knowing that one illness can set back all of your life’s savings, or that one accident can deprive you of a livelihood.  Knowing just how precarious this health and access to health care is, especially for people who have no family or community to protect and/or take care of them, can be a major brake on a person’s moment to moment, not to mention overall, happiness.  That is in spite of, and separate from, the satisfaction or contentment that one may derive from seeing the works of her hands accomplish good things.  Even one who has stood in that small and fearful gap, in harms way for another, one who has brought hope to another at a moment when years had passed without greeting, even such a one may feel content with those works, yet aspire to rejoice at the happiness of others, when others are safe.  Is this happiness, for that one person? 

The happiness of one individual must be viewed, for me, in the wider context of each and every person’s ability to have every need met.  The reason is that if I go to some other part of the world, my own safety is compromised, based on a variety of factors that have nothing to do with my desire to help others, and everything to do with my appearance, origins, and connections.  That situation is neither equitable, nor safe, for anyone.  Ignoring these unpleasant truths will not make them go away, and focusing on one small part of the world that appears positive, while ignoring most of the pain, will never solve our collective problem.  Yet we have it within our power, collectively, to change the situation.  We have the technology, the resources, and the strategic ability to build a system that can allow every human being to reach full creative potential.  If we each choose to have a life of meaning, building for the entirety of humanity, over a lifetime of our pursuit of the fleeting happiness of a moment, we can leave a safer, kinder world where each individual is actually listened to, actually respected for the pebble of meaning that that person brings to help build the rising edifice, and leaves as part of the scaffolding.  We can each have, and also help others, to have a life of lasting meaning, if we want to.

The question is do we want to?

And more importantly, how can we help build a world where no one has to fear living in the street?

Action Items:

1.) Search for two different sources related to happiness versus meaning.

2.) Share the context of those sources, and what you think of them, with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how any ordinary person might help build a better world system, and thus be part of building a world where every person can be full.

4.) Write a book, blog post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, what ideas do you have on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

 

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Click here to read, if you like:

B5, La Casa De Papel/Money Heist, & Lupin & Hakan: Muhafiz/The Protector Reviews

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Parashat Metzorah, Healing Houses, and Caring for People

     This week’s Torah portion,  Metzorah,  is  over halfway (28th/54 or 52, depending on the year: this year, it’s 54…) through the annual cycle, and the 5th Parashah in the book of Vayikra/Leviticus.

   This portion deals with more diagnosis: still the equivalent of modern Universal Health Care (and who’d have thought that the Cohanim were doctors?).  Who knew that even a house could be ill, and this, again, before the idea of Sick Building Syndrome came about, huh?    queen_anne_style_house2c_rockville2c_md2c_1892_-_q7986018 Interesting, no?

         What could equity of responsibility and citizenry look like, if every person had proper health care, and everyone had a safe home? health_pictogram

  I look forward to hearing your thoughts on this matter, Thoughtful Readers.

We can really  Do Better.

-Shira   

 

     Parashat Tazria was last week…

Action Prompts:

    Share your thoughts on how to build buy-in create a more equal, or at least less inequitable, society, please.   Writing, by the way, is my personal contribution to Project Do Better

What would yours be, if you had time?

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan:Muhafiz/The Protector, Lupin, or La Casa De Papel/Money Heist Reviews,

Holistic High School Lessons,

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BsCs

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Continue reading Parashat Metzorah, Healing Houses, and Caring for People

Parashat Tazria, Sick Houses, and Health Care?

     This week’s Torah portion,  Tazria,  is just over halfway (27th/54 or 52, depending on the year: this year, it’s 54…) through the annual cycle, and the 4th Parashah in the book of Vayikra/Leviticus.

   This portion deals with illnesses, isolation, and even diagnosis: all the equivalent of modern Universal Health Care (and who’d have thought that the Leviim were doctors?).  Who knew that even a house, as we’ll see next week, could be ill, and this before the idea of Sick Building Syndrome came about, huh?  Obviously, both the home and the person need health care, from the reading of this week’s parashah.  Interesting, no?

      This week, I am on break, so please imagine and comment here:   What could equity of responsibility and citizenry look like, if every person had proper health care, and everyone had a safe home? health_pictogram

  I look forward to hearing your thoughts on this matter, Thoughtful Readers.

We can really  Do Better.

-Shira   

 

     Parashat Shmini was last week…

Action Prompts:

    Share your thoughts on how to build buy-in create a more equal, or at least less inequitable, society, please.   Writing, by the way, is my personal contribution to Project Do Better

What would yours be, if you had time?

***************** 

Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan:Muhafiz/The Protector, Lupin, or La Casa De Papel/Money Heist Reviews,

Holistic High School Lessons,

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BsCs

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Continue reading Parashat Tazria, Sick Houses, and Health Care?