Tag Archives: dc

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Libraries as Safe Spaces

Who remembers the role that public libraries played in bringing neighbors together?

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us now, and to come and work together, for all of us?

I believe that attention to shared histories of times when a certain library in DC helped, may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, in my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

” …Carnegie Public Library. Some working class neighborhoods, such as the SW neighborhood where Al Jolson learned the speaking style he would later play on
stage, allowed limited mixing. The annual Easter Monday Egg Rolling contest was, however, the only officially non-segregated social event in the city for many years. Despite this, or because of it, Washington, DC was eventually
declared the most segregated city in the Union. That artificial separation of groups and classes of people, with its attendant humiliation and ambiguity for both Negroes and Jews, was shown for the disruptive force it was meant to be, and broken down in two places: the lone institution of learning where all could meet and see past their differences, and the largest market in the city, where all could meet and see their common needs for food, and other goods, as human beings.

At the turn of the century, both communities developed similar ways of evading White discrimination. Both communities built their own institutions, and both sometimes had assimilation attempts. The Jewish community took refuge in its own institutions, from the synagogues to the YMHA near 11th and
Pennsylvania Ave, NW.

Comparable institutions in the African-American
community included churches and the 12th Street YMCA, also known as the Anthony Bowen YMCA, after a prominent free man of color who was a…

 

Page 17″

So, it turns out that I might have needed to explain a bit more about the levels of segregation in the city, on this page.  Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page sixteen was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on shared community spaces, like libraries?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC,  Vote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book):

 

Peace     ! שָׁלוֹם

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and

Babylon 5 review posts (online, offline: B5EpsThr15), and

Baby Acres: a Vision of a Better World (posts listed at bottom of page…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Colors??

Who was considered to be “Colored” and who was considered to be “White” when these things made nearly (and often literally) a life and death difference, and who decided?  That was a complex question, but there was never a question of where both groups stood.  The Reconstruction benefited both, as did working together.

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us now, and to respond to work together, for all of us?

I believe that attention to shared histories of times when we grew a bit more free from discrimination may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, in my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

Chapter 2: Before Jews Were White: Black-Jewish
alliances in DC Before 1948


Image: Carnegie Library and Central Market
-Carnegie Library

 

Much attention has been paid to the alliance between the Black and Jewish communities as a twentieth century phenomenon, but this alliance was born long before the Holocaust.   Between the Civil War and the end of the Reconstruction, the Federal City was relatively desegregated and offered some freedom of movement for people of color, but as the 1880 ́s progressed, those
freedoms were eroded.


By the turn of the century, the city was firmly
segregated, negatively affecting both Jews and African-Americans.

With small and informal exception, the only places where citizens of differing races might mingle freely on any regular basis were Central Market, now roughly located where Archives is, at 7th and Pennsylvania Ave, NW, and the never-segregated ….

 

Page 16″

So, it turns out that I might have needed to explain a bit more about the different periods of cooperation, and that shared color line mentioned on this page.  Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page fifteen was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on shared adversity as a mandate for cooperation?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC,  Vote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book):

 

Peace     ! שָׁלוֹם

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and

Babylon 5 review posts, and

Baby Acres: a Vision of a Better World (posts listed at bottom of page…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

StayedOnFreedomsCallGoodReads

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Alliances

Mutual problems, mutual aid.

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, and to respond to the human need for aid, to all of us?

I believe that attention to shared histories of cooperation may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, in my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

“…burdens while being subject to rather different cultural and ethnic constraints, it
seems only natural that alliances would form between the two communities to
facilitate resistance to their mutual oppression. Such alliances would inspire
communities to cooperate to make positive changes for the benefit of all
citizens. And cooperate they did, both in private and in public….

 

Page 15″

So, it turns out that I might have needed to explain a bit more about that shared oppression mentioned on this page.  Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page fouteen was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on shared humanity as a mandate for alliances?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC,  Vote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book):

 

Peace     ! שָׁלוֹם

Shira Destinie

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and

Babylon 5 review posts, and

Baby Acres: a Vision of a Better World (posts listed at bottom of page…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Parashat Re’eh

Biblical calls to action form part of our society’s foundation, at least in theory.  

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, and to respond to the call for justice?

I believe that attention to shared histories of oppression may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, in my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

“…to the congregation. You shall not oppress the runaway slave, let alone return
him to his cruel master. So what, then, could you make of the growing tensions
over the Fugitive Slave Act, now nearly ten years in effect across the country,
including in slave-holding Washington City and County? The slave trade had
been banished in the Capital, but replaced with something perhaps worse. That
Biblical mandate for freedom must have led many in the Jewish community to
wonder what they could do, particularly given the history of persecution of Jews
even in the United States moving forward as late as 1884 with the lynching of
Leo Max Frank. Thus, shared histories led to cooperation between the two
communities in a variety of ways, at first private, and later more public. The
Jewish community grew in Washington, DC, opening shops and businesses,
mingling with working class families, colored and white, of pre-Urban Renewal
SW. With the Navy Yard as one of the very few employers in the city willing to
hire based on ability alone, both communities faced difficulty in finding jobs
and housing. The new railroad and streetcar suburbs of the 1880s and turn of
the 20 th century, advertising to “the better classes,” frequently employed racially
restrictive housing covenants barring both Jews and Negroes. These shared
burdens, combined with the complementing religious and labor roles of the two
communities, threw their lots together while preventing the rivalries seen
between colored and Irish workers, whose competition for jobs certainly
contributed to the Snow Riots of 1835, the city’s first race riot. Having similar  …

 

Page 14″

So, it turns out that I might have needed to explain a bit more about some of the events, oh, and not left it up to the reader to go look up Parashat Re’eh, mentioned on this page.  Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page thirteen was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on shared oppression as a mandate for cultural cooperation?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book):

 

Peace     ! שָׁלוֹם

Shira Destinie

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and

Babylon 5 review posts, and

Baby Acres: a Vision of a Better World (posts listed at bottom of page…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Call vs. Response

Musical calls to action form part of our society’s way of remembering, and of teaching.  

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, and to respond to the call for justice?

I believe that attention to shared musical forms may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, in my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

“… Prayer and a traditional call and response section of prayer, all the way to the frolicking “Cherie Bim Baum Bim Baum Bim Baum”, Jewish music adapts this
mode of song. Likewise, the familiar spiritual turned freedom song  “Woke up this Morning”   springs instantly to mind as a key example of Call and Response in African-American spiritual music, sung in a variety of settings. That same back and forth structure can also be felt in the slowly building tension of a Klezmer tune, often sharing the same beat pattern as much of the music of the
traditional Negro Spiritual. Rag-time, Jazz, Blues, R & B, and even rock and roll arguably come out of these shared musical structures, interwoven into the fabric of our culture. These shared cultural structures, the challenge of a call used to inspire the ringing response, function both to keep communities together, and to bind them mutually, one to another, in hope and in marching forward.


Shared Strategies: Cooperating To Resist Oppression


“Said Property shall not be sold, conveyed, granted or leased, in whole or in part, to any
Hebrew … or any person or family not of the white race. ”
http://depts.washington.edu/civilr/covenants.htm…


In many ways, shared oppression can be seen as a shared mandate.

Imagine listening, in the summer of the year 1860, to Parashat Re ́eh being read…

 

Page 13″

So, it turns out that I might have needed to give better notes on the shared styles and purposes of the songs mentioned on this page.  Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page twelve was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on musical styles as part of cultural cooperation?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book):

 

Peace     ! שָׁלוֹם

Shira Destinie

April, 2021 CE = April 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and

Babylon 5 review posts, and

Baby Acres: a Vision of a Better World (posts listed at bottom of page…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

StayedOnFreedomsCallGoodReads

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and music

Music is also a crucial part of a person’s health.  

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, and to understand how very connected we all are?

I believe that attention to shared musical styles may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, on page twelve of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

Shared Musical Styles: Call And Response

“I will sing to the Lord, for He has triumphed gloriously;
Horse and driver He has hurled into the sea.
2 The Lord is my strength and might;
He is become my deliverance.
This is my God and I will enshrine Him;
The God of my father, and I will exalt Him.
3 The Lord, the Warrior —
Lord is His name!”
-from the JPS Tanakh Exodus 15:1-3

From the celebratory “Song of the Sea” quoted above, sung each morning
at daily prayers to this day in the Orthodox and Conservative Jewish
movements, to the hauntingly beautiful strains of Drok Yikra, Freedom will be
Proclaimed, (Inside Cover) sung most famously on the Sabbath day by the Jews
of Yemen, Jewish liturgical song has long expressed the human yearning for
freedom. This yearning is shared in the well-known music of traditional Negro
Spirituals, often adapted by the Civil Rights movement as Freedom Songs,
replacing words to fit the situation. Both Jewish and African-American music
show this need to be free, and share other similarities.
Much Jewish liturgical music takes the form of Call and Response, both
in and outside of the sanctuary. From the Barchu, to Ldor va Dor, the Call to…

 

Page 12″

So, it turns out that I might have needed to explain some more of the prayers and traditions mentioned on this page.  Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page eleven was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on music as part of cultural change?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book):

 

Peace     ! שָׁלוֹם

Shira Destinie

April, 2021 CE = April 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and

Babylon 5 review posts, and

Baby Acres: a Vision of a Better World (posts listed at bottom of page…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Transportation for “contraband” people?

Libraries and buses are also an intimately connected and crucial part of a community health care network, for many of us.  

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, and to give more money for mass transit as part of Public Health Care?

I believe that attention to shared and connected community institutions and systems, like Public Transportation and Public Health Care, may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, on page eleven of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

“… observant Jews?  They were barely accepted themselves in this Southern city,
where the community felt obliged to petition for permission to purchase a house
of worship, despite the existence of St. John ́s and other prominent Christian
houses of worship. What fear and guilt may have gone through the minds of
those hearing the words of Parashat Ki Tetzei, Deuteronomy 23:16,
commanding that a slave running away from a harsh master must be allowed to
live wherever he wished, and not oppressed? Here in Washington, DC, the
compensated emancipation, which conditionally freed slaves nine months
before the Emancipation Proclamation, left many slaves waiting for freedom,
continuing to hope for a Moses of their own, as Harriet Tubman was sometimes
called. The well known comparison actually went both ways, as Negro slaves
identified with the plight of the Hebrews enslaved in Egypt, and many Jewish
families in Mississippi and other areas of the South controlled by General Grant
́s troops experienced a homelessness similar to their recently enslaved
contemporaries.

   Runaway slaves crossing Union lines were known as
contrabands, considered to be confiscated contraband property of war.   While
Jews were being expelled from their homes in areas occupied by General Grant’s troops, people of color like Harriet and Louisa Jacobs in the Federal City and
surrounding areas, worked to inspire hope and provide housing for the many
contrabands pouring in to the Capital from the South, an ironic twist of fate in
the history of these two oppressed peoples.

History was not all they shared.

 

Page 11″

So, it turns out that page 10 might have done better with this image toward the bottom, even if it is early in the first chapter?  The Fugitive Slave Act is mentioned on that page, but the consequences are on this page (page 11).

Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page ten was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on the function of trains and buses as part of the community health care system?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book):

 

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

April, 2021 CE = April 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and

Babylon 5 review posts, and

Baby Acres: a Vision of a Better World (posts listed at bottom of page…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

StayedOnFreedomsCallGoodReads

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Public Health Care

Libraries are even part of the community health care network, in many neighborhoods.  

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, and to give more money for Public Health Care?

I believe that attention to shared and connected community institutions, like Public Health Clinics, may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, on page ten of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

“… Georgetown businessman Moses Zachariah Booth in 1865, and the Nash and
Mayo families from Virginia at the turn of the 20th century, so Jewish
businessmen and families trickled into the city before and, poured in during the
Civil War, as with Cantor Lansburgh from Baltimore in 1860, and the Small
family at the turn of the 20th century. Thus there are multiple parallels in the
ways that the Jewish and Black communities, both enslaved as well as free
people of color, had to cope with life in a country where neither was recognized
as fully equal by the White majority.
By the time the first Hebrew Congregation in Washington City is
organizing in 1852, thus present at least as early as 1850, slave coffles are still
passing at night down 7 th Street. The groans of slaves from the nearby DC City
Jail, long used as a federally subsidized slave pen, still echo from the corner of
4 th and G, St., NW, where the first Jewish residents might have passed going
about their day. Those sounds may have been particularly poignant in 1851, as
the Fugitive Slave Act came in to effect. The Act stopped the slave coffles, but
in exchange, required the active participation of all free citizens in the
apprehension and return of runaway slaves. As they listened to the Torah being
read in private homes, in store fronts along 7 th street, or even in SouthWest, near
the Wharf, the destination of those enchained human beings, did they recall
those sounds of suffering? What conflicts might this have raised in the minds of…
10

Page 10″

So, it turns out that those connections may not have been quite as clear as I’d hoped?

Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page nine was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on the function of libraries as part of the community health care system?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plan Book)!

 

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

April, 2021 CE = April 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and Babylon 5 review posts, and Baby Acres: a Vision of a Better World (posts listed at bottom of page…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

StayedOnFreedomsCallGoodReads

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Public Libraries?

Libraries are part of the community gathering and information sharing system for all Americans that must not be forgotten, nor underfunded. 

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, and to give more money for local branches of Public Libraries?

I believe that attention to connecting community institutions, like Public Libraries, may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, on page nine of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

Chapter 1: Shared Oppression, Shared Cultures, Shared
Resistance, Shared History Of Oppression:

“You accepted 400 years of oppression, I have just accepted three thousand years of
oppression!”

-African-American Dr. Jean Cahn, upon converting to Judaism, by permission, E. Cahn

   The rabbis say that it took one man plunging into the Sea and wading in
up to his neck before the waters parted and the Children of Israel were finally
able to be free. As Moses led the Hebrew slaves out of the land of Egypt, up
and out of bondage, so the Negro slaves looked to their faith, even as the
spiritual waters of oppression seemed to rise up to the necks of people of color,
both free and enslaved.

People of color formed communities in spite of the
oppressive atmosphere, overcoming great prejudice to do so, as mistrusted and
often denigrated Jewish citizens also had to do. From Benjamin Banneker in
1791, to Isaac Polock in 1795, the first non-White residents of the city faced
unique challenges, having to prove themselves to their White contemporaries.
In 1850, abolitionists and free people of color advocated for the rights of slaves,
while Captain Jonas P. Levy and the Sons of Israel fraternal members had to
advocate for the rights of Jews, overlooked in our very own treaties.
Just as free individuals and families of color formed connections in the Capital, as with…

Page 9″

So, it turns out that my endnote references to this page were too “dense” for some reviewers.  Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page eight was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on the function of libraries as community information centers?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

 

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and Babylon 5 review posts, and

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

StayedOnFreedomsCallGoodReads

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Pro-bono Adulting

Terms change over time.  So do laws.  Thus, the importance of a free and continuously self-updating public consumer legal local education system for all Americans  must not be underestimated. 

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, with a fully inclusive system of free continuing financial education which includes updates on debt and tax laws for all of us (by state and/or locality…), and build the needed empathy to make that happen?

I believe that attention to terminology may provide part of an answer.  I noted that, a few years ago, on page eight of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

*Notes:


This book will use the terms Colored, Negro, Black, and African-American interchangeably, depending on the time frame under discussion.

This refers to the terms which were in use during the periods in question.

Also, the term Community Cooperation will be defined here as institutional groups, such
as religious and community-based organizations, which bring people in the
aggregate together to cooperate or act together collectively, rather than simply
on the individual level.

Page 8″

So, it turns out that  this note refers to words that we no longer use, for the most part, today.  The sources I looked up used those terms, as they were often written during different time periods, but some authors seem to be using only the phrase African-Americans, these days, even when referring back to times when that phrase was not yet in use.  Some more reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page seven was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on the importance of everyone having access to free and on-going legal and financial information, especially in the context of this pandemic and medical debts that many people have incurred as a result, and the next pandemic to come?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking, and inclusive health care, and

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

 

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.