Tag Archives: familyhistory

Sr. Felix born Margarita Manzilla, OSP archives

Remembering Role Models

Today is the birthday, in 1896, of my Great Aunt Sr. Felix fka Margarita Manzilla, (I have more complete information on Ancestry, if you need an invitation link: I no longer have a paid membership…)  a member of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, one of the first and few orders to admit Colored Women at that time.  She is part of the inspiration for my novel in progress, Book I of my historical fantasy series: Who By Fire.

She, along with my great grandmother, who was the baby of the family, and her four siblings survived the murder of my great great grandfather, their ejection from their home in OK, and the death, shortly after, of my great great grandmother in KS, where they were all entered into orphanages (the two boys in one, and the three girls in another).  They all became Catholics, in those Catholic orphanages, and she entered the convent at a very early age (18, if I recall correctly, but feel free to see the linked documentation).  Sr. Felix stayed in close touch with one of her sisters, and went on to teach, to write poetry, and to leave us her memories, via The Singing Heart.

I am greatly indebted to her, as well as to the OSP, who saved letters between her and family members, saved photos, and shared these archival documents with her relatives.  These examples of strength give us all strength to help contribute to building a better world.  Our society, as Dr. King reminded us, can really Do Better.

In Service,

Shira

Action Prompts:

1.) Share your thoughts on how one is affected by early tragedy, and how historical fiction, and story in general, may encourage empathy-building cooperation, and might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

2.) Write a book, story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts, and share it with us, please.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write

-we can learn from the past Stayed on Freedom’s Call for free,

by Teaching and Learning (Lesson Plans offline) in the present, to

Project  Do Better: to create a kinder future

Peace

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

( 5 month GED lesson 23 of 67 plans…),

and Ranger M.’s Babylon 5 review posts, because story inspires learning, and historical fiction stories inspire tool-building, right?  “Of course right!”

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

Shira

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Who by Fire — All about historical fiction

Shira Dest and I came into contact through a particular post here on A Writer of History. And I’m delighted to welcome her to the blog to talk about her work in progress. Shira’s published historical fiction is a serial short story called Ann & Anna (this is a link to the first part), which was […]

Who by Fire — All about historical fiction

Language of Family History, and Choosing your Hill…

  Tracing the Black Nuns in your family, thanks to this new book from Dr. Shannen Dee Williams, just got a bit easier.  Her “ 1st book, #SubversiveHabits, will be published by

in May 2022! It provides the 1st full history of #Blacknuns in the US & recovers their activism & leadership in the fight for racial, gender, & educational justice.”

The challenges of family history, particularly a family full of mostly Enslaved Persons, and some Free People of Color (free before the Civil War and subject to the Black Codes in most states), means learning the language of genealogy, and then learning your own family language, with names that run in families, especially middle names, and have certain meanings known only to the inner circle at that time.  In order to survive, each of those People of Color had to decide and choose which hill they wanted to die upon: the hill of passing for White, in some cases, despite loosing family to do so, the hill of fighting to educate other Colored people, despite the many hurtles, as my 2xs great grandfather and his daughter, in her turn, did, or the hill, today, of bearing the torch to help educate all people, as many of us are choosing in this difficult time.

  Their story inspired me to write my book Do Better, in the hope of inspiring others to take up the work of changing our system to a more empathetic, ethical, and kinder one for all of us.  That is the hill I choose to die upon.

What hill do you choose to die on? Building or choosing ‘Found Family’ for me is about connecting deeply and personally with other folks who share my values, as my great Aunt Sr. Mary Felix Manzilla did,

MargarFelixManzilla-4

when she joined the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the first Catholic sisterhood open to Colored women, in 1914. I seek to help build community that honors safety and Enough for All, and is willing to die upon the hill of Empathy and Compassion, fighting for Everyone to have Enough of everything that each person needs to live with human dignity. But I seek that community as one looking to build personal family connections, to walk, to teach, and eat together, to look after one another and if necessary, to die for and with one another. In other words, Family, like my great aunt found, with the OSP.

Dear Readers, please consider the people and institutions linked above, and

Action Prompt:

    Share your Hill, if you wish.

 

  Thoughtful Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for COVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport

 

Read, Write

-we can learn from the past Stayed on Freedom’s Call for free,

           by Teaching and Learning (Lesson Plans offline) in the present, to

                         help build a kinder future, and Do Better: … a Better World

( 5 month GED lesson 15 of 67 plans),

   and  Babylon 5 review posts, from a Minbari Ranger’s perspective: story inspires learning…

l’Shalom, Peace

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

Shira

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

 

 

Shira Destinie Jones is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Thoughts on a new short short series on Sundays

It is interesting to me how a story can grab you, or maybe the characters in a story grab you, and refuse to let you go until you’ve told their story.  That is what has happened since this previous Sunday, and the day that began with a bad dream, has ended this week with hope.  I guess that is what stories are supposed to do, no?

The series will be tagged Ann&Anna, although I can’t get that ampersand symbol to take as part of the tag on WordPress.  Some of this comes out of my own family history, but  I hope that we will all be able  enjoy it.  Ann and Anna, Number 1, posted back on Sunday.  Number 2 will be this coming Sunday.

And, Dear Readers, I also hope that this series will move you to learn more ways to help use our history to build new tools.

I look forward to your thoughts.

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on using history, even painful history, to “build back better” as we say, now?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write

-we can learn from the past Stayed on Freedom’s Call for free,

     by Teaching and Learning (Lesson Plans offline) in the present, to

           help build a kinder future: Baby Acres: a Vision of a Better World

 

Peace     ! שָׁלוֹם

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

(Online pdfs of 5 month GED lesson 5 of 67 plans…), and

Babylon 5 review posts, how story inspires learning…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Some dreams are best forgotten? Ann & Anna: Part 1

This morning’s dream did not turn out well, but at least in story, we can give a different, more hopeful ending, right? —

“There’s that fancy!  We got all three!”

           I froze.  Not again.

           Tremors and nausea struggled for dominance, as I wrapped my arms around my belly.  The stench from the canal didn’t help.  The familiar pain again, as I clamped all of my muscles tight.  I could hear feet running toward me in the gathering darkness, even as I stood stock still, knowing all was lost.

           My friends had already fled.   Dropped their baskets and foolishly run along the canal, passing right in front of the President’s House.  I could hear their short strides crossing the road, heavy booted feet pounding after them.  That’d be Mary screaming.  They told us to wait here, to stay together, just present our papers if we were stopped.  But who can blame her.  Mary never really wanted to run.  Just couldn’t be parted with us both.  So this is our fault.

My fault.

            I knew they would know.  Those Free Papers might do for a field hand, but never for a fancy.  The Senator would want his fancy back.  He would never let me go.  But Mary and Sal were going, and I had no future, anyway.  Little Sal was determined, and Mary would never let her go alone.  I couldn’t blame her.

            More screams, this time, the voice of little Sal.  They were closer, now, and the sound of more Constables, shouting, was joined by the rattling of a cart, moving fast enough to cover the sound of the horses hooves pulling our doom closer.  My bowels threatened to spill over, watery humiliation gurgling as I clamped down tighter, recalling what had happened the last time.

              Not to me, of course.  Never.  No marks could be made upon the Senator’s favorite fancy.  But others could suffer, and to punish me, to show me never to run again, others had been made to pay for my mistakes.  Even killed, to be sure that I would know, never leave again.  Mary had explained it, as I wept for them:

“You know why they make us wear these fine dresses.  Why they whip them, and not you.  These white men, they want us because we look like ladies.”

            I had shaken my head at her, not wanting to believe that I was part of the game.  A willing part, as long as I let him touch me.

“But Mary, we are still darkies.  We are not white, that much is clear.”

“Oh, it is clear, honey.  Our light skin lets them dress us up, lets them pretend that we are white women.  What they want, but what they cannot have, they take from us.”

               A twig snapped near me.  Someone was approaching, slowly, carefully.  They had orders, we knew, not to damage us.  It was our beauty that made us so prized on the auction block, often selling for more than a valuable field hand.  Selling that beauty which had no good use.  That beauty which had caused so much pain, and even death.

            I unlaced the top of my bodice.  My beauty would no longer be used for evil.

             This time, no one would die for my weakness.  I pulled my embroidery scissors out of my basket, opening the blades as I found the longest vein on my left arm, and glanced at my right.  For once, it was good to have such light skin.  I can see where the veins run from wrist to elbow.  I’ve looked so often I had them memorized.  No other slave will die because of me, be whipped to spare my flesh, to teach us all not to run.  Only my blood will flow, this time.  I pressed the open blade into my wrist, the other blade biting into my right hand fingers, drawing down along the tendon, welcoming the pain here, instead of down there.  This pain tells me, as I dig deeper, toward my elbow, that I have not submitted.  This pain will wash away my shame, at last.  And no one else will suffer for me.

Not again.

                 A thin stream of blood began to drip from my left arm.  Not enough.  I held up my right arm, letting the sewing basket slide down to my shoulder, and pressed the blade into my right wrist.  Now the open scissors bit into my left hand fingers, but I could almost not feel them, anymore.  By now, it was too dark to see any veins, so I’d just have to use the tendons as a guide, and pull that blade as hard as I could down toward my elbow, toward where my sewing basket hung on my shoulder, until I could dig no deeper.

                Before the open scissor blade could bite into my flesh, a slender dark hand wrapped itself around mine…

Part 2 next weekend… Shira -Shira Destinie Jones

Action Items:

1.)  Share your thoughts on the importance of history, story, and cooperation through both, please. And could someone please tell me why the code editor now wipes out all new html? 2.) Share your thoughts on how we Human Beings might start to build a more fully inclusive society for all of us, and how this story could help that process. 3.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses these thoughts. Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for COVID-19: 1. #PublicLibraries, 2. #ProBono legal aid and Education, 3. #UniversalHealthCare, and 4. good #publictransport ReadWrite, Vote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans offline) My Babylon 5 review posts, if you like Science Fiction, and a proposed Vision for a kinder world (working title now: Do Better) on Wondering Wednesdays… Shira Destinie A. Jones, BsC, MAT, MPhil our year 2021 CE =  12021 HE (GED lesson plans: Day 1 and most day 8) Stayed on Freedom’s Call (free copies at: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…) includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city. Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically. -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button: ,  Please leave a review, if you can make a bit of time, on the GoodReads page.
Shira Destinie Jones is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Continue reading Some dreams are best forgotten? Ann & Anna: Part 1

Stop modern lynchings, learn languages, and get ProBono Legal education for ALL

Some languages help us communicate, while other languages help us make things run smoothly. Computer languages and legal language are examples of the latter. To understand computer languages, one studies computer science, and to understand legal language, one studies the law and policies active in the state of residence. But not all of us have the opportunity to study the crucial legal language that governs much of our existence:   the consequences of that lack    are devastating.

Lynching once occurred physically, but now happens financially, through the court system all across the South, and make no mistake, it is just as murderous, and just as racist:

“…42% of the cases involved black families, despite the fact that only 6% of Carteret’s population is black. Heirs not only regularly lose their land; they are also required to pay the legal fees of those who bring the partition cases. In 2008, Janice Dyer, a research associate at Auburn University, published a study of these actions in Macon County, Alabama. She told me that the lack of secure ownership locks black families out of the wealth in their property. ”

That is, land that is owned by their families.

Historically separate and highly unequal educational systems have also contributed to this system:

“A former state politician named Thomas Limehouse, who owned a luxury hotel nearby, bought Reed’s property at a tax sale for $2,000, about an eighth of its value. Reed had a year to redeem her property, but, when she tried to pay her debt, officials told her that she couldn’t get the land back, because she wasn’t officially listed as her grandmother’s heir; she’d have to go through probate court. Here she faced another obstacle: heirs in South Carolina have 10 years to probate an estate after the death of the owner, and” you can only do that if you know how to probate an estate, which you can only do if you know what it means to probate an estate.

Like my 2xs Great Grandfather Wayne Anthony Manzilla, many Black men were killed “between 1890 and 1920 because whites wanted their land.”

The problem with land law is that it is often “co-opted by big business. One lawyer said that people saw it as a scheme ‘whereby rich men could seize the lands of the poor.’ Even lawyer Nelson Taylor acknowledged that it was abused… his own grandfather had lost a 50-acre plot to (the) Torrens (law). ‘First time he knew anything about it was when somebody told him that he didn’t own it anymore,’ Taylor said. ‘That was happening more often than it ever should have.’ ”

And it should never happen.

“The leading cause of Black involuntary land loss,’ heirs’ property is estimated to make up more than a third of Southern black-owned land — 3.5 million acres, worth more than $28 billion. These landowners are vulnerable to laws and loopholes that allow speculators and developers to acquire their property. Black families watch as their land is auctioned on courthouse steps or forced into a sale against their will.”

So, what can we do about this? Well, several things. To help stop this injustice, at least 4

Action Items

spring to mind:

1.)    Please consider giving your time, your cash, or your attention by sharing via your social and personal or business networks to The Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation, in South Carolina, and:
2.)   Please consider reading and sharing publications by ProPublica, a non-profit that spreads the word on these matters together with potential solutions, and

then:
3.)   Please read, review, and share Dr. Alexander’s book The New Jim Crow, because “42% of the cases involved black families, despite the fact that only 6% of Carteret’s population is black.” so, it really is about race.

4.)   OR:  Simply search for the term “Statute of Limitations” on Google, or your favorite search engine, to see how states like SC prevent heirs like Ms. Reed from probating their property.  If you have the energy, please share your findings with someone, over FaceBook, Twitter, or the phone.

Please share your ideas for increasing Legal and Financial Literacy and opportunity for ALL of us!

This post is dedicated to my Great Great grandparents Wayne Anthony, murdered for succeeding, and his wife Maude Eleanor West Manzilla, who never gave up her legal suit to clear his name of the suicide charge by the life insurance company, and worked valiantly to keep her family together. Their descendants continue their work.

Quotes for this post came from a recent ProPublica article co-published with The New Yorker.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at LEAST for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC,

Vote, Teach and Learn (PDF Lesson Plans offline)

and
my Babylon 5 review posts, if you like Science Fiction,
and
a proposed Vision on Wondering Wednesdays: for a kinder world…

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil

our year 2021 CE =  12021 HE

(Lesson plans:  Day 1Day 5)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free copies at: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

Thoughtful Thursdays, Watch Night services, and Public Transportation

This is just a quick post to say that I wish folks still remembered and celebrated the old Watch Night services, to watch for the telegram announcing emancipation in those slave states still at war, and to pray for freedom for all, as they did on that last night of 1862, and as my great grandmother Marie Johnson (in this blog’s background image, shown with her husband, my adoptive step-great grandfather Adolphus Johnson, both of Blessed Memory) used to do every year, at Booth and Johnson family church, Mt Zion United Methodist Church, in Georgetown.

They took the Metro bus there, or the street car, before they were all paved over around 1963, if I recall reading correctly.  Bus service to Georgetown was never very easy to use, as I recall.  As a small child, I spent summers with my Grandma Marie, and we’d always go to church several times per week, on the bus, from ‘the old folks home’ over to G’town.  I never knew how deep the roots went in G’town with my family.  But I did know how well everyone respected Mr. and Mrs. Johnson. 

May both of their memories long be for a blessing.

 

Action Items:

1.) Search for two different sources related to the history of the Watch Night service,

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Do any Black churches in your area still hold these services?

4.) Write a book, blog post or tweet that mentions Watch Night, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I can’t do that in my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill, because it’s set in 1838. But if you write a book about it, once published, please consider donating to your local public library.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GR button:

Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

December, 2020 CE = December 12020 HE

(The previous lesson 27/67 published since this post, and the most recent lesson 28/67…)

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Stop unfair land loss by learning languages, and getting ProBono Legal education for land owners

Some languages help us communicate, while other languages help us make things run smoothly. Computer languages and legal language are examples of the latter. To understand computer languages, one studies computer science, and to understand legal language, one studies the law and policies active in the state of residence. But not all of us have the opportunity to study the crucial legal language that governs much of our existence, and the consequences of that unequal knowledge can be devastating.

Lynching once occurred physically, but now happens financially, through the court system all across the South, and make no mistake, it is just as murderous, and just as racist:

“…42% of the cases involved black families, despite the fact that only 6% of Carteret’s population is black. Heirs not only regularly lose their land; they are also required to pay the legal fees of those who bring the partition cases. In 2008, Janice Dyer, a research associate at Auburn University, published a study of these actions in Macon County, Alabama. She told me that the lack of secure ownership locks black families out of the wealth in their property. ”

That is, land that is owned by their families.

Historically separate and highly unequal educational systems have also contributed to this system:

“A former state politician named Thomas Limehouse, who owned a luxury hotel nearby, bought Reed’s property at a tax sale for $2,000, about an eighth of its value. Reed had a year to redeem her property, but, when she tried to pay her debt, officials told her that she couldn’t get the land back, because she wasn’t officially listed as her grandmother’s heir; she’d have to go through probate court. Here she faced another obstacle: heirs in South Carolina have 10 years to probate an estate after the death of the owner, and” you can only do that if you know how to probate an estate, which you can only do if you know what it means to probate an estate.

Like my 2xs Great Grandfather Wayne Anthony Manzilla, many Black men were killed “between 1890 and 1920 because whites wanted their land.”

The problem with land law is that it is often “co-opted by big business. One lawyer said that people saw it as a scheme ‘whereby rich men could seize the lands of the poor.’ Even lawyer Nelson Taylor acknowledged that it was abused… his own grandfather had lost a 50-acre plot to (the) Torrens (law). ‘First time he knew anything about it was when somebody told him that he didn’t own it anymore,’ Taylor said. ‘That was happening more often than it ever should have.’ ”

And it should never happen.

“The leading cause of Black involuntary land loss,’ heirs’ property is estimated to make up more than a third of Southern black-owned land — 3.5 million acres, worth more than $28 billion. These landowners are vulnerable to laws and loopholes that allow speculators and developers to acquire their property. Black families watch as their land is auctioned on courthouse steps or forced into a sale against their will.”

So, what can we do about this? Well, several things. To help stop this injustice, at least 4 Action Items spring to mind:
1.)    Please consider giving your time, your cash, or your attention by sharing via your social and personal or business networks to The Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation, in South Carolina, and:
2.)   Please consider reading and sharing publications by ProPublica, a non-profit that spreads the word on these matters together with potential solutions, and

then:
3.)   Please read, review, and share Dr. Alexander’s book The New Jim Crow, because “42% of the cases involved black families, despite the fact that only 6% of Carteret’s population is black.” so, it really is about race.

4.)   OR:  Simply search for the term “Statute of Limitations” on Google, or your favorite search engine, to see how states like SC prevent heirs like Ms. Reed from probating their property.  If you have the energy, please share your findings with someone, over FaceBook, Twitter, or the phone.

Please share your ideas for increasing Legal and Financial Literacy and opportunity for ALL of us!

This post is dedicated to my Great Great grandparents Wayne Anthony, murdered for succeeding, and his wife Maude Eleanor West Manzilla, who never gave up her legal suit to clear his name of the suicide charge by the life insurance company, and worked valiantly to keep her family together. Their descendants continue their work.

Quotes for this post came from a recent ProPublica article co-published with The New Yorker.

Let’s #EndPoverty , #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail starting by improving these four parts of our good #PublicDomainInfrastructure 4:
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !


#PublicDomainInfrastructure #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19
ShiraDest

December, 12020 HE

book review, languages, and family history as self-Health Care?

Here is what language-learning and family history research can do for your health: perspective…

-History of Black Slavery in Puerto Rico, by Soler:

Historia de La Esclavitud Negra En Puerto RicoHistoria de La Esclavitud Negra En Puerto Rico by Luis M. Soler

This extensive and not easy to read, but well worthwhile history of slavery in Puerto Rico, shows the importance not only of where we have been, but also what tools we have now and how to evaluate them in the light of past and present situations. The author comments that a Cooperative could have saved the small coffee producers of Puerto Rico, though not on whether that would have enabled the liberation of their enslaved workers. Yet this is a step forward in the analysis of both labour relations and the history of People of Color in the Americas.

I now also know that the family of my enslaved 5xGreat Grandfather Miles Manzilla could even have originated in Spain itself, potentially. Our shared origins are important to know, both for understanding why enslaved workers would have defended their masters during Indian attacks, and also in deciding how to relate to our history of enslavement today. What feelings remain to be resolved on all sides?

P. 15 del pdf = P. 21 del libro
La Corona y los esclavagistas se creaban liberales y generosos, evidentemente, pero sus esclavos no compartieron ese sentimiento!
The Crown and owners thought themselves generous, but their slaves disagreed!

P. 25=32: Ya sabîa Bartolomé de Las Casas pero no de Fray Antonio de Montesinos a favor de los indigenes.
Dominicans vs Franciscans ??

P.33 Las Ordenanzas No Fueron Cumplidas…

         The Orders (…of the King to protect the Indigenous/Indian/Native Population) were Not Obeyed…

P.33=P.40: At least he admitted his error before he died;

                   Al menos se admetîa su error antes de su muerte.

P.77pdf=P.86: The author thinks that a Cooperative would have saved small producers in PR from the falling coffee prices (due to Cuban overproduction)…

P. 126 So France had a Black Code, too? Of course, where did the southern colonies/states (USA) get them from…

3 November, 1839: Pope Gregory XVI condemned the Slave Trade? and Baltimore, and Maryland…

In summary, there was not only lots of Mestisage, but a good bit of back-and-forthing of slaves between PR and the English and French-speaking colonies. Thus, entirely possible that Miles Manzilla, Sr’s family was of Spanish colony origin.

Read, Write, Run, Teach !

ShiraDest
18 February, 12016 HE

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 Nos vemos!  

Action Items in support of health for all that you can take right now:

1.) Consider your thoughts on slavery and the modern-day effects on Black families in the USA.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

Dear Readers, any additional ideas toward learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning as part of on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write

Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

ShiraDest

NaNoWriMo 2020 CE

November, 2020 CE = 12020 HE

(The previous lesson plan since this post, and the most recent lesson plan…)

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Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Ancestors and names, and Health Care ?

This one may be a stretch, given that we’re talking about personal connections to history, and personal identification of oneself. Nevertheless, connection, both external and internal, has to do with health, no?

Names of ancestors and our names, given and chosen, affect us across the generations.  So, here is a story about Ancestors, and  Robert A. Pinn

-quote

1.)    While I was searching for a formerly enslaved ancestor (

   
 
in a free DB of VA tax rolls trying to replace lost 1790 & 1800 census records,

Mundilla, Lot (Black) Caroline County (index is 1799personalA page 10)

):

full text of web page on Emily J. Manzilla’s husband
one of my great aunts, daughter of Miles and Ann Manzilla, sister of m gr gr. Edward Manzilla, who married Margaret C. Butler on 4 jul 1861:

“PAGE 249 – BLANK

PAGE 250 – PICTURE OF ROBERT A. PINN

PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. – 251

but in the various enterprises which He has followed, has always been successful, and he is today one of the substantial men of Tuscarawas Township.

The lady to whom Mr. McIntosh was married bore the maiden name of Annie Bixler, a daughter of Samuel Bixier, an early settler in Bethlehem Township. To them were granted the following children: Elmira, Frances, Samuel, Sarah A., Amanda, Milton, Corn, Peter and Franklin. After his marriage, Mr. McIntosh made his [ionic for a twelvemonth in Tuscarawas Township, and then, taking up his abode in Bethlehem Township, lived there for a number of years, when he moved to his present farm. He is the possessor of a quarter-section of fine land in this township, which bears all the improvements found upon the place of an enterprising and progressive agriculturist. Politically speaking, he is a sound Democrat, and, in a religious sense, he is equally as sound in the faith of the German Reformed Church, which denomination he has served as Deacon for many years.

ROBERT A. PINN, formerly Junior Vice commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, Department of Ohio, is numbered among the many colored men who did heroic service for the Union during the late war. He was one of the first to offer his services to the Government, but was refused on account of color. Nothing daunted, he went out with the old Nineteenth Ohio Infantry, and in 1862, learning of the movement to organize n company here, returned and joined the Fifth Regiment, and also induced a few of his colored friends to do likewise. He has one of the best war records in the State of Ohio, and is most highly respected wherever known.

In Perry Township, Stark County, Mr. Pinn was born March 1, 1843. His father, it native of Fauquier County, Pa., was born in bondage, and lived with his mother’s relatives until eighteen years old, when he ran away from home and came to Steubenville, Ohio, and learned the trade of a blacksmith in that place. About 1822, he came to Canton, where he remained until his marriage ten years later. He then purchased a farm in ferry Township, the old homestead now owned by our subject, and gave his attention to agricultural pursuits until his death in the fall of 1871, aged seventy-five years. He was a man of splendid information, particularly in ancient history, and his retentive memory enabled him to store his mind with an abundance of valuable knowledge. In religious preference, be was a Congregationalist., and was very familiar with the Scriptures. Politically, he was a Republican and an Abolitionist.

The mother of our subject, Zilphia Broxon, was born in Mercer County, Ill., of English descent, and her relatives were large land-owners in the Keystone State. She died in Perry Township, leaving ten children seven of whom grew to mature years. Our subject, who was the sixth in the family was reared on the Lone farm, and when eleven years old commenced to learn the trade of a broom manufacture. In the fall of 1861, as the United States would not then take colored troops, he went out with the Nineteenth Ohio Infantry under the care of Major-Surgeon Hurxthal. He marched South with the regiment, fund when the battle commenced at Shiloh, could not resist the impulac,but seized a,musket and jumped into the thickest of the light. Afterward, he participated in several other engagements, where he was conspicuous for bravery. As soon as colored troops were allowed to enter the service, he enlisted, and as above stated, persuaded some of his friends to do the same.

Mr. Pinn was appointed Sergeant,and later First Sergeant, and in the hatter capacity marched from Norfolk, Va., aund assisted in breaking up a band of guerrillas that infested the swamps of South Virginia and northern North Carolina.. In the spring of 1864, the regiment proceeded to the front of Petersburg and Richmond, where they were constantly on duty. September 29, there occurred the great battles of Chapin’s Farm, New Market Heights and Ft. Harrison, and in these three dis-

252 – PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD.

tinet engagements of that day the regiment with which Sergeant Pinn was connected played a most important part, and the long rows of the dead showed how fatal was that part as well as prominent. When the sun rose on that day, five hundred and fifty men stood in ranks, and when it went down only two hundred and eight were left to answer the roll call, three hundred and forty-two having fallen by the wayside. Of these nine commissioned officers were wounded, two hundred and forty-eight enlisted men wounded and eighty-five killed.

At the first volley in the morning, the Captain was wounded, and the command fell to Sergeant Pinn, who led the troops through the series of fights that day, although three times wounded himself. The first wound was received in the left thigh; the second wound, which was caused by a shell penetrating the left limb, so disabled him that he could not walk, but he detailed two men to carry him at the head of his company through all the fight. Just before the close of the battle when Ft. Harrison was captured, about five o’clock :,e received a terrible wound in the right shoulder as he was coming over the hill and, with cap in hand,was shouting words of encouragement to his men. He became unconscious, and the men who had carried him to the front laid him on the field in that state.

Although terribly wounded, our subject refused to be discharged, and as soon as he could travel, rejoined his company, and served until the close of the war. For gallant conduct that day, he was awarded two medals, one from Congress and the other from Gen. Butler. Today these medals are more to him than the memory of shoulder straps, which would have been awarded him had he been a white man. He was discharged at Carolina City, September 20, 1865, and returned to Stark County.

After his return, Mr. Pinn engaged in teaming and contracting until the spring of 1874, when he sold his business, and went to Oberlin College, pursuing the course of studies there for four years and employing his leisure hours in reading law with Prof. Thomas. He finished his legal studies at Massillon with R. H, Folger, and was admitted to the Bar in 1879, at once beginning the practice of his profession. He is now actively engaged as an attorney, being United States Pension Attorney, and having charge of all the local pension business here.

In addition to the old homestead, Mr. Pinn owns eighty acres in Tuscarawas Township and a residence at No. 96 Akron Street, in Massillon. He married, in 1867, Miss Emily J. Manzilla, who was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, her demise occurring April 25, 1890. Socially, Mr. Finn is identified with the Masonic fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is a prominent member of Hart Post No. 134. G. A. R., at Massillon, which he has served as Post Commander. In 1888, he was Junior Vice-department commander of Ohio. He takes deep interest in all Grand Army matters, and attends all the National Encampments. He is a strong Republican, and served his party as delegate to the State convention which nominated William McKinley Governor of Ohio.”

from a website which was free, but now requires us to pay for this information.

Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

Action Items:

1.) Consider your thoughts on the importance of ancestors and their names,

2.) Share your thoughts if you’d like to,

Dear Readers, any additional ideas toward learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning as part of on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write

Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

ShiraDest

NaNoWriMo 2020 CE

November, 2020 CE = 12020 HE

(The previous lesson plan since this post, and the most recent lesson plan…)