Tag Archives: familyhistory

The Writing Process, Editing eBooks, and Cars That Won’t Run, Dad?

So this is what a Karmann Ghia looks like, huh?

Editing this version of almost draft number seven reminded me of how I rescued, on a dare, an old Kindle from Oblivion as it was about to be recycled because a landlady of mine in New Mexico said it no longer worked. Not quite as good as getting a dead car to run, like my father used to do, but, it’s a start.    Apparently as they said in my father’s funeral, people used to give him old cars that wouldn’t run, and he would not only get them to run, but also supe them up and race them.    Nevertheless I was proud of myself that I got this really old Kindle to run, and have been using it for years now. I find that for some reason it makes a big difference editing in ebook format, where I usually do my edits, or rather, do my proofreading, in PDF format. Now I have found that I catch even more errors that I never spotted in the document or even in the PDF version, when I do the final read through on the eBook.  (Forgot to mention: I find that the best version comes from feeding the doc to Calibre for conversion to mobi format…)
I guess it’s a change of perspective, maybe it’s looking at it as my dad might have looked at it ?
He’s been gone, to that great garage in the sky, some might say, since July of 2007,  (after which time, an uncle told me that Dad, in High School, had actually wanted to become a photo journalist -who ever heard that idea about him?!)  but my memories of him working on the car, and reminding me to “engage brain before putting mouth in gear” remain.   And so does the legend of his old Karmann Ghia.
Thanks for the editing help, Dad.
Destinie
(now mostly known as Shira…)

*****************

Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan: Muhafiz/Protector,  Lupin, or La Casa de Papel/Money Heist Reviews

Holistic College Algebra & GED/High School Lesson Plans,

Thoughtful Readers, please consider reading about #ProjectDoBetter.

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Turkish Tuesday: Babamın Kemanı (My Father’s Violin)

What do we not learn from this beautiful film?  babasi

Lessons:
1.)  Things are not always as they seem, even when it looks like your big brother has abandoned you.
2.)  Even when the struggle seems hopeless, imagine how that kid has survived, and keep going.
       This film starts off with a father, clearly suffering from TB, caring for his young daughter Özlem, and teaching her, through music, about life and the people in the world.  Sadly, she doesn’t get much time to learn with him, as the TB finished him off.  Fortunately, she did learn enough to show her bombastic uncle that she is also a violin virtuoso, once he learns to listen.  Along the way, we learn how he turned to this bombastic defense mechanism, and how some family history, passed by his niece to him from his defunct brother, changes his views.  Also, we see some of the distinctions in Turkish society between upper and lower class Istanbul’luler (residents of The City), and a bit of the bureaucracy inherited from Byzantium.
     An incredibly beautiful film that I didn’t mind watching 3 times to catch some of the rapid fire Turkish!

Shira

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Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan: Muhafiz/Protector,  Lupin, or La Casa de Papel/Money Heist Reviews

Holistic College Algebra & GED/High School Lesson Plans,

Thoughtful Readers, please consider reading about #ProjectDoBetter.

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Turkish Tuesdays, Istanbul, late 2004, and Izmir, early 2005, Memory of Chanon’s bus Lymeric post

This post is pretty much a reminder that the only way to learn anything is by doing it badly, at first, and then: persisting!  🙂  It is also a tribute update of an old post: To Channon.

Some thoughts from back when I lived in Turkey, originally posted at the start of 2020’s global pandemic, but putting in a bit of order as I try to make sense of my longing to get back to languages before I forget them all (glad to see that I’ve improved quite a bit since then!), and to make time to learn all of the lessons from those places where I lived, searching for something that I am not sure how to find.

“2005-03-23 15:10:00
Group Limerick -on the bus!!
Here is a limerick Channon and I composed with the help of several fellow passengers (!)on the bus as we travelled to meet some SERVAS friends (the SERVAS http://www.servas.org coordinator here in İzmir, as it turned out) here in İzmir:

Izmir’de çok kaybolduk
“Hangi tarafa döndük?!”
Mutfak çok pislik
Zor temizledik
Efes’i gördük, mutluyduk

the link to all of his travel limericks is also available from this link, i think… https://lists.ccs.neu.edu/pipermail/craignet/2005/000122.html

=========
Here is my original in a more readable form…
—-
Izmir’de cok kaybolduk
“Hangi tarafa donduk?!”
Mutfak cok pislik
Zor temizledik
Efes’i gorduk, mutluyduk
—-

…sorry, thought I’d posted the translation with it:
In Izmir we were lost all the time
“Which way did we turn?!”
The kitchen was really dirty
We had a hard time cleaning it
We say Ephesus, we were happy

The conversation before the lymeric (ok, or maybe after the Lymeric…) !!   I am very grateful that this friend visited me, as I’d never have taken the time to see anything around me, working as I did constantly, while I lived in Izmir.   May his memory be for a blessing:

“At Ersan Pansyon, just off of Kibris Shehitler caddesi, near my apartment, there is a nice young man who works there, who yesterday offered us breakfast and the opportunity to talk. My guest Chanan does not speak Turkish, so I served as both translator and breakfast guest with him. This has been wonderful. I have forgotten the young man’s name, but he asked many questions about the US, which I translated for Channon from a Boston/NY perspective, and occasionally threw in my own perspective on growing up in the South. One thing that particularly struck me, which I have hear from religious Turks before, is that they are anxious for Americans and Europeans to know that Turkey is different from the other muslim countries, and *is not Arab* -and also is not a bed for fanatical Islam. The current president, as our friend told us, comes from a religious background, as does the family that runs this pansyon, and none of them are fanatics. All do however believe strongly in hospitality and friendship. He told us that all of the people in the world are relatives, all descending from Adam and Eve. This was a wonderful conversation.
2005-03-24 12:52:00”

“cultural note: Kurds, Turks, and Jewish (Sephardic) families all kiss the hand and touch the forehead of the eldest person/host as a greeting. I was quite surprised to see this as a universal custom (ok, at least one Kurdish family and extended friend group, only one Jewish family that I got to spend alot of time with around their extended family, and I’ve only seen Turkish family greetings on TV here in the commercials and shows. The Turkish family I lived with did not do this, but they are quite wealthy, and Americanized).

My Kurdish friends love to sing! They do not however consider me Jewish, because my father and mother are not Jewish. That seems to be the same sentiment I got from the Turkish and Jewish people I spoke with here in Istanbul as well.

Most people use propane gas for cooking. Natural gas is only in rich areas, so far.

Here, the doorway is not the place to hide during an earthquake. Under a table is what my roommate tells me…
2004-11-09 17:34:00″
from:..

“karamsar, dark or negative thinking, really?

A person in Izmir accused me of being thus, for refusing to bring a new life into this world. I beg to differ…
May all people who wander be granted peace of mind, and complete, total Shalom. “

And lastly but most certainly not least of all, remembering old friends who visited (twice!!):

“2005-03-23 15:10:00
Group Limerick -on the bus!!
Here is a limerick Channon and I composed with the help of several fellow passengers (!)on the bus as we travelled to meet some SERVAS friends (the SERVAS http://www.servas.org coordinator here in İzmir, as it turned out) here in İzmir:

Izmir’de çok kaybolduk
“Hangi tarafa döndük?!”
Mutfak çok pislik
Zor temizledik
Efes’i gördük, mutluyduk

the link to all of his travel limericks is also available from this link, i think… https://lists.ccs.neu.edu/pipermail/craignet/2005/000122.html

=========
Here is my original in a more readable form…
—-
Izmir’de cok kaybolduk
“Hangi tarafa donduk?!”
Mutfak cok pislik
Zor temizledik
Efes’i gorduk, mutluyduk
—-

…sorry, thought I’d posted the translation with it:
In Izmir we were lost all the time
“Which way did we turn?!”
The kitchen was really dirty
We had a hard time cleaning it
We say Ephesus, we were happy

2005-03-25 14:15:00
Los EE y el emperio Romano; ABD ve Roma emperyum; US and the Roman Empire…
Estoy trabajando para amigos en leer sus documentos en ingles, escuchando a Nuevo Flamenco muy bonito (me sorpresa que Slash puede tocar la gitarra tan bueno asi!), y preocupando por me permiso de trabajar, y yo estaba pensando en los EE y Roma, que similar; En los ultimos años, la culta del emperor y los valores familiares fue mucho hablado (me temo que he olvidè a esta idioma, y nunca fue tan bueno, asi que me perdoneran, ustedes queridos leeredores…). Una buen amiga me decia que los EE y Roma tienen muchas cosas en comun…

*cringe* now for the Turkish attempt -I’m still trying to translate the last line :
*ahora en Turquesa, aunque estoy tratando de traducir a la ultima linea de la respuesta de Silmaril…

Çalışıyorum ve düşünüyorüm -çalışma vizem nerede? Düşündüm ki ABD ve Roma Emperyum çok beğenziyor.
***
As I shuttle back and forth between trying not to worry about where the bleepety bleep bleep bleep my bleeping work visa is (lost in Ankara …), work on reviewing the English documentation for some friends, and reading this paper on Global Civil Society …

Memories.  Neither misty nor water-colored.

Working on learning.  öğrenmeye çalışıyorum.

End of my old post, while living in Izmir.

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Click here to read, if you like:

B5, La Casa De Papel/Money Heist, & Lupin & Hakan: Muhafiz/The Protector Reviews

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider follwing   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

A Neglected Part of Black History

Here is what language-learning and family history research can do for your health: perspective…

-History of Black Slavery in Puerto Rico, by Soler:

Historia de La Esclavitud Negra En Puerto RicoHistoria de La Esclavitud Negra En Puerto Rico by Luis M. Soler

This extensive and not easy to read, but well worthwhile history of slavery in Puerto Rico, shows the importance not only of where we have been, but also what tools we have now and how to evaluate them in the light of past and present situations. The author comments that a Cooperative could have saved the small coffee producers of Puerto Rico, though not on whether that would have enabled the liberation of their enslaved workers. Yet this is a step forward in the analysis of both labour relations and the history of People of Color in the Americas.

I now also know that the family of my enslaved 5xGreat Grandfather Miles Manzilla could even have originated in Spain itself, potentially. Our shared origins are important to know, both for understanding why enslaved workers would have defended their masters during Indian attacks, and also in deciding how to relate to our history of enslavement today. What feelings remain to be resolved on all sides?

P. 15 del pdf = P. 21 del libro
La Corona y los esclavagistas se creaban liberales y generosos, evidentemente, pero sus esclavos no compartieron ese sentimiento!
The Crown and owners thought themselves generous, but their slaves disagreed!

P. 25=32: Ya sabîa Bartolomé de Las Casas pero no de Fray Antonio de Montesinos a favor de los indigenes.
Dominicans vs Franciscans ??

P.33 Las Ordenanzas No Fueron Cumplidas…

         The Orders (…of the King to protect the Indigenous/Indian/Native Population) were Not Obeyed…

 

P.33=P.40: At least he admitted his error before he died;

                   Al menos se admetîa su error antes de su muerte.

 

P.77pdf=P.86: The author thinks that a Cooperative would have saved small producers in PR from the falling coffee prices (due to Cuban overproduction)…

 

P. 126 So France had a Black Code, too? Of course, where did the southern colonies/states (USA) get them from…

3 November, 1839: Pope Gregory XVI condemned the Slave Trade? and Baltimore, and Maryland…

In summary, there was not only lots of Mestisage, but a good bit of back-and-forthing of slaves between PR and the English and French-speaking colonies. Thus, entirely possible that Miles Manzilla, Sr’s family was of Spanish colony origin.

Read, Write, Run, Teach !

ShiraDest
18 February, 12016 HE

View all my reviews

 

 Nos vemos!  

Action Items in support of health for all that you can take right now:

1.) Consider your thoughts on slavery and the modern-day effects on Black families in the USA.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

 

Action Prompts:

1.) Share your thoughts on how we can build empathy in our society today

2.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

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Click here to read, if you like:

Science Fiction/Fantasy Shows,  Lupin, or Money Heist

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

 

Tracing Black Family History, via Black Nuns

This post is even more relevant now, than two years ago:

Tracing one’s family, particularly a family full of mostly Enslaved Persons, and some Free People of Color (free before the Civil War and subject to the Black Codes in most states), means learning the language of genealogy, and then learning your own family language, with names that run in families, especially middle names, and have certain meanings known only to the inner circle at that time. In order to survive, each of those People of Color had to decide and choose which hill they wanted to die upon: the hill of passing for White, in some cases, despite loosing family to do so, the hill of fighting to educate Colored people, despite the many hurtles, as my 2xs great grandfather and his daughter, in her turn, did, or the hill, today, of bearing the torch to help educate all people, as many of us are choosing in this difficult time.

What hill do you choose to die on? Building or choosing ‘Found Family’ for me is about connecting deeply and personally with other folks who share my values, as my great Aunt Sr. Mary Felix Manzilla did, when she joined the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the first Catholic sisterhood open to Colored women, in 1914. I seek to help build community that honors safety and Enough for All, and is willing to die upon the hill of Empathy and Compassion, fighting for Everyone to have Enough of Everything

(… taking a quick “station break” for some Standing Action Items on that:
1.) Tell your local Transit Board to build more Light Rail stops,
2.) Tell your local city council to hire more librarians, add social workers and nurses to the library staff, and add washing stations to Public Library bathrooms,
3.) Ask your Community College Provost to give free classes on State Law Basics covering local land, property, contract and Statutes of Limitations laws (with shuttle bus service from poor neighborhoods!),
4.) Ask your State Senators and Reps to pass Universal Health Care in your state, and tell your Congressmen to do likewise at the Federal level.
…)

that Every Human Being needs to live with human dignity. But I seek that community as one looking to build personal family connections, to walk, to teach, and eat together, to look after one another and if necessary, to die for and with one another. In other words, Family, like my great aunt found, with the OSP.

Please consider the people and institutions linked above, and

Action Items:

1.)    Share your Hill, if you wish.

2.)     Simply Google your town’s Mass Transit Authority, to see if you have a Light Rail.  Then, if you have one, ask them to expand it!  🙂  If not, ask them how a simple and cheap trolley or light rail line could be put in.

*****************

Click here to read, if you like:

Science Fiction/Fantasy Shows,  Lupin, or Money Heist(soon…)

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Stop Black Land Loss via Language Learning, and ProBono Legal Education

Some languages help us communicate, while other languages help us make things run smoothly. Computer languages and legal language are examples of the latter. To understand computer languages, one studies computer science, and to understand legal language, one studies the law and policies active in the state of residence. But not all of us have the opportunity to study the crucial legal language that governs much of our existence, and the consequences of that unequal knowledge can be devastating.

Lynching once occurred physically, but now happens financially, through the court system all across the South, and make no mistake, it is just as murderous, and just as racist:

“…42% of the cases involved black families, despite the fact that only 6% of Carteret’s population is black. Heirs not only regularly lose their land; they are also required to pay the legal fees of those who bring the partition cases. In 2008, Janice Dyer, a research associate at Auburn University, published a study of these actions in Macon County, Alabama. She told me that the lack of secure ownership locks black families out of the wealth in their property. ”

That is, land that is owned by their families.

Historically separate and highly unequal educational systems have also contributed to this system:

“A former state politician named Thomas Limehouse, who owned a luxury hotel nearby, bought Reed’s property at a tax sale for $2,000, about an eighth of its value. Reed had a year to redeem her property, but, when she tried to pay her debt, officials told her that she couldn’t get the land back, because she wasn’t officially listed as her grandmother’s heir; she’d have to go through probate court. Here she faced another obstacle: heirs in South Carolina have 10 years to probate an estate after the death of the owner, and” you can only do that if you know how to probate an estate, which you can only do if you know what it means to probate an estate.

Like my 2xs Great Grandfather Wayne Anthony Manzilla, many Black men were killed “between 1890 and 1920 because whites wanted their land.”

The problem with land law is that it is often “co-opted by big business. One lawyer said that people saw it as a scheme ‘whereby rich men could seize the lands of the poor.’ Even lawyer Nelson Taylor acknowledged that it was abused… his own grandfather had lost a 50-acre plot to (the) Torrens (law). ‘First time he knew anything about it was when somebody told him that he didn’t own it anymore,’ Taylor said. ‘That was happening more often than it ever should have.’ ”

And it should never happen.

“The leading cause of Black involuntary land loss,’ heirs’ property is estimated to make up more than a third of Southern black-owned land — 3.5 million acres, worth more than $28 billion. These landowners are vulnerable to laws and loopholes that allow speculators and developers to acquire their property. Black families watch as their land is auctioned on courthouse steps or forced into a sale against their will.”

So, what can we do about this? Well, several things. To help stop this injustice, at least 4 Action Items spring to mind:
1.)    Please consider giving your time, your cash, or your attention by sharing via your social and personal or business networks to The Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation, in South Carolina, and:
2.)   Please consider reading and sharing publications by ProPublica, a non-profit that spreads the word on these matters together with potential solutions, and

then:
3.)   Please read, review, and share Dr. Alexander’s book The New Jim Crow, because “42% of the cases involved black families, despite the fact that only 6% of Carteret’s population is black.” so, it really is about race.

4.)   OR:  Simply search for the term “Statute of Limitations” on Google, or your favorite search engine, to see how states like SC prevent heirs like Ms. Reed from probating their property.  If you have the energy, please share your findings with someone, over FaceBook, Twitter, or the phone.

Please share your ideas for increasing Legal and Financial Literacy and opportunity for ALL of us!

This post is dedicated to my Great Great grandparents Wayne Anthony, murdered for succeeding, and his wife Maude Eleanor West Manzilla, who never gave up her legal suit to clear his name of the suicide charge by the life insurance company, and worked valiantly to keep her family together. Their descendants continue their work.

Quotes for this post came from a recent ProPublica article co-published with The New Yorker.

Originally posted in December, 12020 HE

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Click here to read, if you like:

Science Fiction/Fantasy Shows,  Lupin, or Money Heist

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Sr. Felix born Margarita Manzilla, OSP archives

Remembering Role Models

Today is the birthday, in 1896, of my Great Aunt Sr. Felix fka Margarita Manzilla, (I have more complete information on Ancestry, if you need an invitation link: I no longer have a paid membership…)  a member of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, one of the first and few orders to admit Colored Women at that time.  She is part of the inspiration for my novel in progress, Book I of my historical fantasy series: Who By Fire.

She, along with my great grandmother, who was the baby of the family, and her four siblings survived the murder of my great great grandfather, their ejection from their home in OK, and the death, shortly after, of my great great grandmother in KS, where they were all entered into orphanages (the two boys in one, and the three girls in another).  They all became Catholics, in those Catholic orphanages, and she entered the convent at a very early age (18, if I recall correctly, but feel free to see the linked documentation).  Sr. Felix stayed in close touch with one of her sisters, and went on to teach, to write poetry, and to leave us her memories, via The Singing Heart.

I am greatly indebted to her, as well as to the OSP, who saved letters between her and family members, saved photos, and shared these archival documents with her relatives.  These examples of strength give us all strength to help contribute to building a better world.  Our society, as Dr. King reminded us, can really Do Better.

In Service,

Shira

Action Prompts:

1.) Share your thoughts on how one is affected by early tragedy, and how historical fiction, and story in general, may encourage empathy-building cooperation, and might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

2.) Write a book, story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts, and share it with us, please.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write

-we can learn from the past Stayed on Freedom’s Call for free,

by Teaching and Learning (Lesson Plans offline) in the present, to

Project  Do Better: to create a kinder future

Peace

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

( 5 month GED lesson 23 of 67 plans…),

and Ranger M.’s Babylon 5 review posts, because story inspires learning, and historical fiction stories inspire tool-building, right?  “Of course right!”

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Who by Fire — All about historical fiction

Shira Dest and I came into contact through a particular post here on A Writer of History. And I’m delighted to welcome her to the blog to talk about her work in progress. Shira’s published historical fiction is a serial short story called Ann & Anna (this is a link to the first part), which was […]

Who by Fire — All about historical fiction

Language of Family History, and Choosing your Hill…

  Tracing the Black Nuns in your family, thanks to this new book from Dr. Shannen Dee Williams, just got a bit easier.  Her “ 1st book, #SubversiveHabits, will be published by

in May 2022! It provides the 1st full history of #Blacknuns in the US & recovers their activism & leadership in the fight for racial, gender, & educational justice.”

The challenges of family history, particularly a family full of mostly Enslaved Persons, and some Free People of Color (free before the Civil War and subject to the Black Codes in most states), means learning the language of genealogy, and then learning your own family language, with names that run in families, especially middle names, and have certain meanings known only to the inner circle at that time.  In order to survive, each of those People of Color had to decide and choose which hill they wanted to die upon: the hill of passing for White, in some cases, despite loosing family to do so, the hill of fighting to educate other Colored people, despite the many hurtles, as my 2xs great grandfather and his daughter, in her turn, did, or the hill, today, of bearing the torch to help educate all people, as many of us are choosing in this difficult time.

  Their story inspired me to write my book Do Better, in the hope of inspiring others to take up the work of changing our system to a more empathetic, ethical, and kinder one for all of us.  That is the hill I choose to die upon.

What hill do you choose to die on? Building or choosing ‘Found Family’ for me is about connecting deeply and personally with other folks who share my values, as my great Aunt Sr. Mary Felix Manzilla did,

MargarFelixManzilla-4

when she joined the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the first Catholic sisterhood open to Colored women, in 1914. I seek to help build community that honors safety and Enough for All, and is willing to die upon the hill of Empathy and Compassion, fighting for Everyone to have Enough of everything that each person needs to live with human dignity. But I seek that community as one looking to build personal family connections, to walk, to teach, and eat together, to look after one another and if necessary, to die for and with one another. In other words, Family, like my great aunt found, with the OSP.

Dear Readers, please consider the people and institutions linked above, and

Action Prompt:

    Share your Hill, if you wish.

 

  Thoughtful Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

 

*****************

Click here to read, if you like:

Science Fiction/Fantasy Shows, Lupin…

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

 

Thoughts on a new short short series on Sundays

It is interesting to me how a story can grab you, or maybe the characters in a story grab you, and refuse to let you go until you’ve told their story.  That is what has happened since this previous Sunday, and the day that began with a bad dream, has ended this week with hope.  I guess that is what stories are supposed to do, no?

The series will be tagged Ann&Anna, although I can’t get that ampersand symbol to take as part of the tag on WordPress.  Some of this comes out of my own family history, but  I hope that we will all be able  enjoy it.  Ann and Anna, Number 1, posted back on Sunday.  Number 2 will be this coming Sunday.

And, Dear Readers, I also hope that this series will move you to learn more ways to help use our history to build new tools.

I look forward to your thoughts.

Action Items:

1.) Please share your thoughts on using history, even painful history, to “build back better” as we say, now?

2.)  Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

3.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

*****************

Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan: Muhafiz/Protector,  Lupin, or La Casa de Papel/Money Heist Reviews

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

It is interesting to me how a story can grab you, or maybe the characters in a story grab you, and refuse to let you go until you’ve told their story.  That is what has happened since this previous Sunday, and the day that began with a bad dream, has ended this week with hope.  I guess that is what stories are supposed to do, no?

The series will be tagged Ann&Anna, although I can’t get that ampersand symbol to take as part of the tag on WordPress.  Some of this comes out of my own family history, but  I hope that we will all be able  enjoy it.  Ann and Anna, Number 1, posted back on Sunday.  Number 2 will be this coming Sunday.

And, Dear Readers, I also hope that this series will move you to learn more ways to help use our history to build new tools.

I look forward to your thoughts.

Action Items:

1.) Please share your thoughts on using history, even painful history, to “build back better” as we say, now?

2.)  Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

3.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

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Click here to read, if you like:

B5, Hakan: Muhafiz/Protector,  Lupin, or La Casa de Papel/Money Heist Reviews

Holistic High School Lessons,

Thoughtful Readers, if you are on Twitter, please consider following   #Project Do Better  on Twitter.

Shira

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Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

 

Peace     ! שָׁלוֹם

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

(Online pdfs of 5 month GED lesson 5 of 67 plans…), and

Babylon 5 review posts, how story inspires learning…)


 

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.