Category Archives: books

StayedOnFreedomsCallGoodReads

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Public Libraries?

Libraries are part of the community gathering and information sharing system for all Americans that must not be forgotten, nor underfunded. 

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, and to give more money for local branches of Public Libraries?

I believe that attention to connecting community institutions, like Public Libraries, may provide part of an answer.  I started a note about that, a few years ago, on page nine of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

Chapter 1: Shared Oppression, Shared Cultures, Shared
Resistance, Shared History Of Oppression:


“You accepted 400 years of oppression, I have just accepted three thousand years of
oppression!”


-African-American Dr. Jean Cahn, upon converting to Judaism, by permission, E. Cahn


   The rabbis say that it took one man plunging into the Sea and wading in
up to his neck before the waters parted and the Children of Israel were finally
able to be free. As Moses led the Hebrew slaves out of the land of Egypt, up
and out of bondage, so the Negro slaves looked to their faith, even as the
spiritual waters of oppression seemed to rise up to the necks of people of color,
both free and enslaved.


People of color formed communities in spite of the
oppressive atmosphere, overcoming great prejudice to do so, as mistrusted and
often denigrated Jewish citizens also had to do. From Benjamin Banneker in
1791, to Isaac Polock in 1795, the first non-White residents of the city faced
unique challenges, having to prove themselves to their White contemporaries.
In 1850, abolitionists and free people of color advocated for the rights of slaves,
while Captain Jonas P. Levy and the Sons of Israel fraternal members had to
advocate for the rights of Jews, overlooked in our very own treaties.
Just as free individuals and families of color formed connections in the Capital, as with…

Page 9″

So, it turns out that my endnote references to this page were too “dense” for some reviewers.  Some fresh reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page eight was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on the function of libraries as community information centers?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

 

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…), and Babylon 5 review posts, and

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Wondering Wednesdays, Baby Acres, and Human Rights as Justice

This post  goes on to begin the rough draft of my current non-fiction WiP, Baby Acres: A possible Vision for Making Society Suck Less, in 60 Years.   (Thanks, once again, to JYP and Tammy for the title ideas!!)  The overall goal has been to lay out a roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us, so, I am turning, this week, to the introductory chapter, Chapter 0, of the book, in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met.  This book lays out one possible path for getting to that point.

Introduction part II: Peace and Justice

 

   Peaceful change revolves around various types of justice.  Social justice is perhaps the first type of justice that comes to mind, but economic justice, both of outcome and of opportunity, and also climate and other sorts of justice count heavily when considering the factors involved in building a just society.

 

  Social justice is one of the more obvious types of justice, or more visible, in terms of how we human beings treat one another.  The basic human rights to dignity, equal treatment under the law, and equal access to resources as seen in the right to due process, competent legal representation, etc, have been the focus of civil rights activism and litigation, most prominently in the 1960s, but reaching much farther back than that, in the United States (Jones, Stayed on Freedom’s Call, P. 20). Cooperation between many oppressed groups over time has led to a variety of policies aimed at addressing mistreatment of vulnerable people in public venues, often based on visible characteristics such as race, gender, etc.  The right to associate and travel, live in safe areas, access social venues, etc, has often been addressed, however, without actively acknowledging the fact that the realistic exercise of these rights is dependent upon the actual ability to pay for access to these rights, as most of our venues in the US require some form of entrance fee, or payment.  What often goes unaddressed, and ignored, is the right to economic justice that forms the bedrock of one’s ability to gain access to nearly all of these rights, in practical usage.  Yet, this lack of acknowledgment and action is not due to lack of warning.  Many have pointed out over the years that providing social justice, without providing economic justice, is paying mere lip service to the ideal of a just society.

 

   The calls for economic justice as part of social equity in the United States go back far, but a convenient start might be the most well known of those calls, from the 1960s.  In 1963,The March on Washington was a march for “jobs and freedom” as part of the long struggle to end Jim Crow, implemented both as social segregation, and also as economic segregation.  The economic part of Jim Crow, preventing most Negroes from working in most professional job positions, was the true motor of inequality, leading to both the formation and enforced permanence of a deliberately poverty-stricken underclass constantly obligated to accept any jobs offered by the dominant members of society.  The codification of this system based on skin color meant that even after the end, de Jure, of social Jim Crow, the majority of the members of that underclass remained stuck in the position of living in substandard housing and having to accept the lowest paying of jobs because the dominant culture had not changed, even when the laws did.  Thus, the legal ability to attend the same cinemas, the same schools, and the same concerts did not grant the financial ability do take advantage of these new rights.  Jim Crow was still, economically speaking, alive and well despite new social justice laws.  Many observers, from Dr. King himself, who called for a Citizen’s Income just a few years after that famous march (King, Where Do We Go From Here, 1967), to Joseph Stiglitz, to Steve Pressman, to Thomas Piketty, have continued to point out that economic inequality both hampers all forms of justice for vulnerable groups.  They also argue that economic inequality exerts increasing pressure toward injustice on all groups, from the dominant down to the most vulnerable, in that society.  Thus, social justice and economic justice must really be considered one: two sides of the same coin.

 

A society which would like to consider itself just toward all of its members, and indeed attempts to provide social and economic justice for all groups, would still be missing something crucial, if social and economic justice were the only types of justice to be considered.  While public goods such as libraries, health care, transportation, and education may be considered part of the social or economic spheres, these systems are also part of a set of pieces of social infrastructure which work in our society both as common touch stones, and as common points of concern.  Each person needs access to information, and to community level places for gatherings and  entertainment, provided by local libraries.  Each person needs health care, and the health of every resident in a society affects every other resident, from the hospital system right down to the sewage and water treatment systems.  Transportation is a concern that touches every resident as well, whether driving in a private car, or riding on a trolley, and the culture and education of every resident of a society inform how those modes of transportation will be used, or abused.  Yet, information and communication systems, sanitation, transportation, and even schools all impact the local environment, and also pull resources from the local environment.  And, as many Native American Tribal councils, like that of the Black Hills, in South Dakota, can confirm, not all lands are treated with equal care.  Thus, climate and land or commons based justice must also be considered, as part of the foundation of any just society.  Hence, social, economic, and commons based justice must all form part of any discussion or offering of a potential vision for a just society.  Those three fundamental forms of justice must also then be made tangible by codifying specific examples of what that might look like.  One offering of an example was given to us by a president who saw the need to end both segregation and to list necessary freedoms.

 

That is the rough draft of the first part of my introductory chapter. 

Last week was the third installment of this series…

Action Items:

1.) Search for two different sources related to visions for a better world.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how Commons Justice (or bad) can affect a society that might be built, in 50-100 years.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button:

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The previous lesson 51/67 , and the most recent lesson 52/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

StayedOnFreedomsCallGoodReads

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Pro-bono Adulting

Terms change over time.  So do laws.  Thus, the importance of a free and continuously self-updating public consumer legal local education system for all Americans  must not be underestimated. 

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, with a fully inclusive system of free continuing financial education which includes updates on debt and tax laws for all of us (by state and/or locality…), and build the needed empathy to make that happen?

I believe that attention to terminology may provide part of an answer.  I noted that, a few years ago, on page eight of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call:

*Notes:


This book will use the terms Colored, Negro, Black, and African-American interchangeably, depending on the time frame under discussion.

This refers to the terms which were in use during the periods in question.

Also, the term Community Cooperation will be defined here as institutional groups, such
as religious and community-based organizations, which bring people in the
aggregate together to cooperate or act together collectively, rather than simply
on the individual level.

Page 8″

So, it turns out that  this note refers to words that we no longer use, for the most part, today.  The sources I looked up used those terms, as they were often written during different time periods, but some authors seem to be using only the phrase African-Americans, these days, even when referring back to times when that phrase was not yet in use.  Some more reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page seven was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on the importance of everyone having access to free and on-going legal and financial information, especially in the context of this pandemic and medical debts that many people have incurred as a result, and the next pandemic to come?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking, and inclusive health care, and

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

 

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Wondering Wednesdays, Baby Acres, and Human Rights as Equity

This post  goes on to begin the rough draft of my current non-fiction WiP, Baby Acres: A possible Vision for Making Society Suck Less, in 60 Years.   (Thanks, once again, to JYP and Tammy for the title ideas!!)  The overall goal has been to lay out a roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us, so, I am turning, this week, to the introductory chapter, Chapter 0, of the book, in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met.  This book lays out one possible path for getting to that point.

Introduction: Empathy-building as an ongoing part of all
4 Phases


Having cited some of the reasoning which led up to the inception of this project, we now delve into the foundational concepts behind each phase. Empathy-building, through various means, is a continual part of each phase, as without empathy, no society can be just or safe or kind.

This vision of one potential just society is based on the ideas that such a society must be defined by its levels of both empathy and of full respect for the Human Rights of every living person. Such rights as the right to equity, the right to help create peaceful change, and to have each of those four freedoms that President FDR spoke about, embody the essence of a just society. But that essence still requires some tangible way to measure the level of justice, change institutions and systems that need changing, and to define specific ideals upon which those justice seeking institutions build, and to what particular ends.


Human Rights must be the starting point for any society which seeks to be a just society.  The application of named rights for each human being in an equitable manner is essential for a
society to be truly just. Some way to measure that application is also necessary. John Rawls proposed a test for determining whether a given society could be considered just, via a thought experiment. While that test will neither be debated nor explained in full here, further exploration of his writings will show that his proposal involved imagining oneself, after having designed a just society, as being given the choice to become part of that society, but without any knowledge of the position in which one, personally, would enter it. Rawls suggested that if a person would not be willing to enter a given society with no knowledge, or under a thick veil of ignorance, as to what that person’s position would be in the society, then that society might not be a just society. For example, no reasonable person, not knowing what position he or she might have, would consent to become part of US society, because if the position of that person turns out to be one of a homeless person, then the lived experience of the vast majority of people who experience homelessness would indicate that entering society in that position would very nearly doom one’s chances in life. Thus, Rawls’ test would show that the current state of American society is not that of a just society. As many have pointed out. Like Noam Chomsky.


Chomsky and others have written many books and articles detailing a variety of critiques of US and other current societies, in terms of the damage that governments of the United States and other developed nations allow to be done in the name of economic competition. A just society must be just for its own citizens, and must also promote the ideals upon which it is founded in its dealings with other societies. On that basis, Chomsky finds that US treatment of other nations is especially unjust, and that injustice is a reflection of treatment withing US society of the most vulnerable communities within US society, as well, such as Black Americans, refugees, and women of all races. So, the treatment of citizens within a just society must also be mirrored by how that society treats those outside of its boundaries with whom it has dealings, as Chomsky points out on page 83 of his book Profits over People: unfairly vilifying and then crushing a nation for the sake of economic competition is unjust not only to those outside of a society, but even to those within the ‘winning’ society, as the reality of such behavior is evident even to small children, when viewed without the coloring of propaganda. The effects within US society, for example, of the embargo against Cuba over the long term, have been to harden views in some quarters against any compromise or opening of discussion on the topic, while others in American society have come to see hard-liners insistent on the embargo as both anti-Cuban and even anti-immigration. Thus, unfair treatment of outsiders by members of even a just society affects all members within that society, causing divisions and even justifying mistreatment of dissenting opinions, rendering that formerly just society unjust in the act. This shows that even a just society would have to have ways of interacting with other societies that set boundaries and spell out ideals to which all connected societies could aspire.


Eleanor Roosevelt, in helping to redact the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human
Rights, drew heavily on the concept enshrined in the US Declaration of Independence “that all
men are created equal… that they are endowed with certain inalienable rights…” which include the right to be treated with equal dignity to that of every other human being, regardless of momentary state of being, such as poverty or wealth, gender, religion or lack thereof, etc. As crucial as to whom these rights apply, the document defined an international standard of what rights should be considered as basic to all human beings. The right not to be tortured is, for example, a basic human right which applies to each and every human being at all times and under all circumstances. Likewise with “the right to life, liberty, and security of person.”
Certain rights, such as that negating slavery, which is in direct contradiction to the 13th
Amendment to the US federal Constitution, were visionary in their global scope, considering that many nations had not yet completed the rebuilding from the destruction of the second world war, and even that of the first, the Great War. The UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights is thus a fitting starting point for our definition of what, in terms of tangible rights, a just society ought to look like. The definition of those rights does not, in itself, show us all of what a just society looks like, but it is a start, beginning at where we are today, from a documentary and international legal point of view. It shows that to build a truly just society, we do not really have that far to go. With a set of basic human right in place to which everyone around the world has agreed, in principle, we can move on to look at ways in which those rights could potentially be implemented in a way that would be equitable for all human beings on the planet. Given that the current global systems of finance, trade, etc, are clearly highly inequitable, a just society must therefore have mechanisms in place to allow the peaceful changing of the systems of governance, and even of government, allowing citizens within the society to change parts of the system of governing that show themselves to be unjust. Such peaceful revolution, though, revolves around several connected but distinct types of justice, and depends upon the ability of all citizens to make their voices heard in absolutely non-violent, non-threatening, and non- aggressive manners, so that all citizens can feel both heard, and protected.

That is the rough draft of the first part of my introductory chapter. 

Last week was the second installment of this series…

Action Items:

1.) Search for two different sources related to visions for a better world.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how good governance (or bad) can affect a society that might be built, in 50-100 years.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button:

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The previous lesson 51/67 , and the most recent lesson 52/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

StayedOnFreedomsCallGoodReads

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Public Transportation

The importance of a free and safe public transportation system for all Americans  must not be forgotten. 

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, with a fully inclusive mass transit network or all of us, and build the needed empathy to make that happen?

I believe that Marvin Caplan’s Neighbor’s, Inc. provided part of an answer, a few years ago, which continues with page seven of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call, and the Preface for the book:

…   diverse heritages in that tense decade after desegregation. At about the same
time, in the same city yet another world away, Dr.s Jean and Edgar Cahn were
pioneering Black-Jewish cooperation, on the social and legal fronts. Both DC
families, old and new, drew on the faith which had kept them going, and used
that faith to inspire hope in a new generation, which took up the torch to carry
on the struggle to light the lamp of cooperation across yet more communities.

Page 7″

So, it turns out that  this Preface was intended to give an idea of some of the historic connections to the author with DC, but some more reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page six was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on the importance of everyone having access to safe and affordable transportation, especially in the context of this global pandemic, and the next one to come?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking, and inclusive health care, and

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

 

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Wondering Wednesdays, Baby Acres, and Governance Concerns

This post continues to expand on my current non-fiction WiP, Baby Acres: A possible Vision for Making Society Suck Less, in 60 Years.   (Thanks, again, to JYP and Tammy for the title ideas!!)  The overall goal still being to lay out a roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us, I am turning, this week, to Phase III.  Just a short overview, mind you, to explain what my thoughts are as I start to work on fleshing the whole idea out for the book.  I realized that any society that could  pass the Rawlsian Veil of Ignorance Test would still be connected to societies that might not pass that test, which would be a problem for that just, or even merely less unsafe, society.  A serious problem.

That meant that All HumanKind  would have to be included in both Phases III and IV, since otherwise, large waves of economic migration would be generated from unsafe places, toward any society where security and basic needs were met.  Kind of like now, with the waves of refugees fleeing the on-going wars in various parts of the world toward Europe and the US.

If you follow my blog regularly, you know of a hash tag #publicdomaininfrastructure.  That tag encompasses four basic parts of our social infrastructure system which I think could give the most ‘bang for the buck’ if we devoted more support to them: Public Libraries, Public Health Care, Public Education (for both kids and adults), and Public Transportation.   With those areas shored up, our society then has the foundation for more participatory and inclusive governance structures, that can also scale up to fit in other parts of the world, as those areas levels of development increase, a bit like accession to the European Union.

Phases I and II develop the key basic stepping stones for a just society, building on empathy and critical thinking skills, the four key Public Domain Infrastructure systems, and an educated public able and willing to protect and teach themselves and others how to stay safe emotionally, physically, financially, and intellectually.  That means having systems that support those needs, like health care, libraries, well-rounded educational systems for all ages, and solid mass transit.  We must start by building those foundations in our own country, but they are also sorely needed in every country around the world, as attested to by many NGOs and UN agencies.  And it is with those international bodies that we can work to ensure that those basic health, information access, education and transportation needs are met for all people of the world.

In Phase III, both here and in other parts of the world as they are interested and able, ideas like Participatory Budgeting, Citizens Juries, Ranked Choice Voting or IRV, and local complementary currencies to supplement existing national monetary supplies can be tried and adjusted or abandoned depending on the needs of the community in question.  All of these tools are part of including a wider array of people in the decision-making processes that determine how resources are allocated among people in a given locality.  These tools each depend, however, on understanding the importance of cooperation and acting in good faith toward ones fellow citizens and residents.

So, Phase III would require an expanded world view, and a population ready to reach out to others, to learn new languages, to see through the lenses of other people’s experiences.   Thus, phases I and II are intended to build the necessary empathy, foundational bases for understanding, and then the values and skills for protecting others that could then allow such growth.

“And so, it” began, last week..

Action Items:

1.) Search for two different sources related to Good Governance.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how good governance (or bad) can affect a society that might be built, in 50-100 years.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button:

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The previous lesson 67/67 , and the most recent lesson 1/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

StayedOnFreedomsCallGoodReads

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Public Health

The importance of a free and effective public health care system for all Americans cannot be overstated.  In fact, it should actually be pretty obvious, at this point, no?

So, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, with a fully inclusive health care system for all of us, and build the needed empathy to make that happen?

I believe that Marvin Caplan’s Neighbor’s, Inc. provided part of an answer, a few years ago, which continues with page six of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call, and the Preface for the book:

Preface

“A bridge between economics and spirituality…” That is how Dr. Edgar
Cahn, co-author of “The War on Poverty: A Civilian Perspective” and inventor
of Time Banking, characterizes his new social structure dedicated to System
Change. That is also what this book hopes to inspire: the building of more
bridges between social economics and lived spirituality, starting with my
community of origin and my spiritual community of choice. My family, Black
DC residents for five generations on each side, is an intimate part of DC ́s
African-American community, singing and worshiping at Mt. Zion UMC, St.
Augustine’s, and St. Luke ́s. We also form part of the history of Black-Jewish
community cooperation in the city, back to my adoptive great grandfather
Adolphus Johnson, who worked as head tailor at Kann ́s Department store for
many years (“Can’s” as they used to pronounce it). My mother, Antoinette
Bourke, shares recollections of Jewish shop owners Rose and Herman Gerber,
who ran a small store on the corner near her home at 1905 Lincoln Rd, NE. The
Gerber’s and other Jewish-owned shops, like that on the corner of 10 th and O St.,
NW, frequently extended credit to their colored* customers. In starting at
Calvin Coolidge Senior High School in 1964 with classmates from the Hebrew
Academy, my mother also recalls learning about Jewish culture and sharing …

Page 6″

So, it turns out that  this Preface was dedicated partly out of a sense of obligation, to some folks in DC in the older generation with whom I no longer have ties.  I am not sure if removing them would also remove part of the tie to some of the historic people of DC, but some more reviews would help me decide that specific.

Page five was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on the importance of everyone getting free health care to everyone, especially in the context of this global pandemic, and the next one to come?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing empathy-building cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking, and inclusive health care, and

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

 

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

StayedOnFreedomsCallGoodReads

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Public Education

The importance of a free and effective public education system for kids and adults cannot be overstated.

Yes, that was for adults as well.  We all need to continue learning until we push up daisies.

  Yet, how do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, without privatizing our public education system?

I believe that Dr. King’s call for a Citizen’s Income provided part of an answer, a few years ago, which continues with page five of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call, and the Table of Contents for the book:

“Table of Contents
Stayed on Freedom’s Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities
In Washington, DC ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..1
Preface……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….6
Chapter 1: Shared Oppression, Shared Cultures, Shared Resistance………………………………….9
Shared History Of Oppression: …………………………………………………………………………………9
Shared Musical Styles: Call And Response……………………………………………………………….12
Shared Strategies: Cooperating To Resist Oppression………………………………………………..13
Chapter 2: Before Jews Were White: Black-Jewish alliances in DC Before 1948………………16
Carnegie Library and Central Market……………………………………………………………………….16
Kann’s And Morton’s……………………………………………………………………………………………..18
New Negro Alliance, Shared Tactics: Pickets And Boycotts ……………………………………….20
Chapter 3: Shepherd Park: Integration Starts In The Home……………………………………………..22
Keeping the Neighborhood Integrated: Neighbors, and T.I. ………………………………………..22
WES/Fabrangen and Hanafi Muslims: Liberal Jews and Neighbors of Color re-forming
alliances ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………24
African-Americans As Part Of The Jewish Community: On The Inside Looking Out…….25
Chapter 4: A Ground Breaking Couple: Jean and Edgar Cahn ………………………………………..27
Antioch School Of Law/UDC ………………………………………………………………………………..27
Time Banks USA…………………………………………………………………………………………………..29
Racial Justice Initiative (RJI)…………………………………………………………………………………..32
Chapter 5: Current Efforts In DC Black-Jewish Community Cooperation ……………………….34
Tifereth Israel Neighborhood Tutoring, EBL Walk …………………………………………………..34
Sharing Points Of View………………………………………………………………………………………….35
SHIR Tours…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..36
Chapter 6: Walking Tours Highlighting Black-Jewish Community Cooperation, With Songs
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..38
Downtown Black-Jewish DC: From the Library to the YMHA……………………………………38
Uptown Black-Jewish DC: Shepherd Park………………………………………………………………..44
References:……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….52

Page 5″

So, it turns out that  this ToC shows only the first page of references, which have been called “dense,” and still “need unpacking,” according to some reviewers.  This is likely to be true, but some more reviews would help me with the specifics.

Page four was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on the importance of everyone getting free Higher Education?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how continuing educational cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking,

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

 

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The last GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

StayedOnFreedomsCallGoodReads

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Continuing Legal and Financial Education

I think that the importance of continuing pro bono legal and financial education at the local level is often overlooked as a tool for all of our uplift.  There are many ways that ordinary people can help one another learn about local legal laws, like state Statutes of Limitations, or consumer protection laws in your county, in cases where they clarify, as in Montgomery County, in Maryland.

If the common good, or the general welfare, requires each person to pay one’s debts, then how can we not think of the role of understanding the implications of each financial document that we sign, and how to understand that, in the absence of understanding of local financial law?   How do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, while helping us all, especially young people, understand financial legal bindings?

I had part of an answer, a few years ago, which continues with page four of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call, and the two song titles which were combined to create the title for this book:

“Stayed on
Freedom” lyrics
Woke up this
morning with my
mind
Stayed on
freedom
2x
Hallelu, Hallelu,
Hallelujah.
I’m walking and
talking with my
mind stayed on
freedom
2x
Hallelu, Hallelu,
Hallelujah.
“Dror Yikra”
lyrics
Dror Yikra l’ven
im bat
V’yintsorchem
k’mo vavat.
“Freedom Will Call”
lyrics
(title is author’s
translation)
He will proclaim
freedom for all his
children
Na’im shimchem And will keep you as
velo yushbat.
the apple of his eye
Sh’vu venuchu Pleasant is your name
b’yom Shabbat.
and will not be
destroyed
D’rosh navi
Repose and rest on the
v’ulami
Sabbath day.
Va’ot yesha ase
imi
Seek my sanctuary and
Neta sorek b’toch
my home.
karmi
Give me a sign of
She’e shav’at
deliverance.
b’nei ami.
Plant a vine in my
vineyard.
Look to my people,
hear their laments.
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/general-article/soundtrack-lyrics/#morning


http://www.hebrewsongs.com/song-droryikra.htm

Page 4″

So, it turns out that the page will not easily format as it is seen in the book, but the idea is there (and I kind of like the way it came out almost as an interlinear translation).

Page three was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on the importance of everyone, especially the young, understanding local financial laws regarding Statutes of Limitations, etc?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.  (My example: the CA Office of the AG’s summary, from the CA legal code online…)

3.) Share your thoughts on how Continuing legal and financial Education via citizen cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking,

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

 

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

February, 2021 CE = February 12021 HE

(The last on-going GED lesson 67/67 , and the first lesson 1/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

StayedOnFreedomsCallGoodReads

Thoughtful Thursdays, Stayed on Freedom with the Call of Freedom, and Public Transportation

I think that the importance of the public transit system is often overlooked as a tool for middle class uplift.

Yes, middle class uplift.  We used to talk about “colored uplift” to mean tools that would helping lift the Black community out of poverty, like education, and culture, but no one seemed to mention the need for the dominant community in the US to learn more about us, as Dr. King pointed out with the Kerner commission report.

If the common good, or the general welfare, requires each person to take responsibility for one’s individual duties of citizenship, then how can we not think of the role of trains in moving people in larger numbers and greater comfort than buses and cars?   How do we each help our society to become more fully inclusive for all of us, without privatizing our transportation funding?

I had part of an answer, a few years ago, which continues with page three of my book Stayed on Freedom’s Call, and the list of people interviewed for the book:

Interviews:
Hayden Wetzel, Archivist, The Sumner School and Museum, Washington, DC, December 2010


Antoinette L. Bourke, Native Washingtonian of Color, November

-January 2012-2013

 

Rabbi Eli Aronoff, Rabbi, TBE

-7 November 2012

 

Gilbert Burgess Native Washingtonian of Color

-12.12.12

 

Steve Ross Native Washingtonian of Color And Head of Facilities, TI)

–22.12.2012


Dr. Edgar Cahn, Founder Antioch School of Law, Time Banks USA, RJI

– 25.12.2012


John (Johnny) Brown, Native Washingtonian of Color, 2 January 2013

 

Page 3″

So, it turns out that  this page needed more editing for date consistency, and that will need to be edited before releasing a new version.

Page two was last week…

Action Items:

1.) What are your thoughts on the importance of everyone, especially the middle classes, supporting and using public transportation?

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how middle class transportation cooperation might help, or hinder, inclusive thinking,

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at least for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this

GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DCVote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

 

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

February, 2021 CE = February 12021 HE

(The previous GED lesson 67/67 , and the most recent lesson 1/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.