Tag Archives: cooperation

Moody Mondays and marriage as a social good, rather than just an individual right

In considering the arguments about same-sex marriage, I only recall hearing about individual rights versus property and religious concerns. What I don’t recall seeing, though, is any recognition of the functions other then the traditional property consolidating measure that marriage has always been, as well as sometimes protecting the woman, in the case of the latter Rabbis as cited by Rabbi Jill Jacobs. But I see marriage as benefiting society, in general.

If we encourage people to pair up in the hope of being more productive and protective, for themselves and others, together than separately, then they can also help the rest of the community more effectively.

 

I spotted an old post that I made a few years ago, as discussions about Marriage Equality were starting to come out into the open.  Many things in our society need to be discussed openly, and in rational and cooperative and empathetic terms.  This was one discussion that turned out to be interesting and reassuring, if not conclusive:

 I had an interesting discussion on the bus today with a gentleman who began opposing same-sex marriage on the grounds that the human race would end, and parted promising to continue the dialogue, and admitting to seeing another point of view. I began by pointing out that since statistically only 10percent of men and 5 percent of women prefer same-sex partners, the human race is not about to end if we refuse to reproduce. I then compared prohibiting gay marriage to prohibiting mixed race marriages, with which he strongly disagreed. I rebutted with the point that both interracial and gay marriages were prohibited on moral and biblical grounds, and that the importance in both cases, human rights aside, is that marriage is about commitment in the context of community. All marriages strengthen community by allowing the community to support the couple and encouraging the couple to commit their contributions and energy to the community. This gives both the community and the couple a vested interest and a stake in the success of the other. Interestingly enough he responded that people need to talk more about these things openly, which is exactly what my friends had said in Spanish as we discussed the immigration law reform, at the bus stop! :-). God talking to me in stereo again Tammy!!

 

Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

Action Items in support of community and cooperation that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different ideas.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

 

Dear Readers, any additional ideas toward learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning as part of on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write

Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

 

ShiraDest

Preptober for NaNoWriMo 2020 CE

October, 2020 CE = 12020 HE

(The previous lesson plan since this post, and the most recent lesson plan…)

metro

Moody Mondays, mass transit, failed business plans, and Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

I am exhausted today, but wanted to get a blip out there about the importance of every class of people, especially the middle and upper middle classes, using the public transportation systems: please use mass transit!

Regarding the business plan, I can only find the abstract, though I remember writing up about 9 or 10 pages, despite being told that “tourists do not want to walk,” and that they want “to check my brain at the door” and be entertained, not educated, and certainly not about slavery in the Nation’s Capital.  I created the business, anyway…

 

Executive Summary
SHIR is a cooperative community enterprise working to provide
educational tools by which the paradigms of critical thinking and
equality, the birthrights of all people, are actively promoted.
SHIR focuses on movement-oriented educational techniques which
simultaneously build love of learning and community in ways which
incorporate natural curiosity and multiple learning styles. SHIR
implements this focus through community affirming walking tours as
the primary form of outside-the-classroom learning.
The long term vision of SHIR is to provide guided walking tours of
Washington, D.C. with emphasis on the history of African-American
neighborhoods in the city. These tours will incorporate multi-media
history from different neighborhoods by time period and demographic
era, and feature participatory discussions of the values held across
those communities and neighborhoods over various time frames.

The marketing section needed more work, as this business failed in 2013.

 

So, it turns out that I should have listened about there being no market for Black-Jewish history walking tours, but making the point was more important to me than making money, and I got my wish: I made a point for a few months, but then realized that I was losing all of my savings, and in an apartment with cigarette smoke coming in from the noisy neighbors, I couldn’t concentrate enough around my tours to get paid work. At least I did write and publish a book about it, with the tours freely available (with the bibliography, despite being told to keep it secret: sorry, Knowledge should be free!!) for all walkers in DC. (Please remember to wear a hat, sensible shoes, and bring water and grapes to snack on!!)

  More on my continuing striving with education for Justice next time, friends:

Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different resources on why History Matters.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how you like each of the resources you found,  perhaps as an update on your GoodReads reading,

4.) Write a blog post or tweet that uses history, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Dear Readers, any additional ideas toward learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning as part of on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

(The previous lesson plan since this post, and the most recent lesson plan…)

Libraries and Language learning on Moody Mondays, from FORTRAN to Python! And may we all be Inscribed for a Good New Year, 5781. Shannah Tovah (Happy New Year 5781)

Ask Tamar, Ruth, and Scheherazade.  Even ladies in the Bible had to learn new languages, and sometimes, languages as ancient as FOTRAN or old Hebrew, to as new as Python or modern Arabic, hold the key to successfully charting a course in new waters.

רֶגַע… Rega… Wait, you say:
Scheherazade is not in the Bible, she is from the Thousand and One Nights, originally in Arabic, or maybe partly in Persian, but certainly not in Hebrew;
This, you remember!

Ok, point taken, her book was not in Hebrew, but Arabic is a sister language.  More on this shortly…

Tamar was a Canaanite woman, and so had to learn Hebrew, or Judah’s dialect of Hebrew at the very least.
Ruth, a native of Moab, had to learn the Hebrew of the time of her mother-in-law, Naomi.
Scheherazade, at the palace, had to learn the hardest languages of all: the languages of heartbreak, of story, and of love.

So, you see, returning to those sister languages, Scheherazade’s story, in one Semitic language, really is the same as that of her Biblical sisters, in another Semitic language: she was a clever lady faced with a survival situation in a man’s world. And she, like her sisters, had to learn a language in order to survive.

Each one of these ladies had to live by her wits in difficult times, and to use the tools available to her at that time. Nowadays, they would surely go together to the Public Library to learn to use the power of modern tools like computers and smartphones, especially using Unix to navigate this new world.   In the here and now, any one of us can learn a bit of a language to pass on to another young woman, helping her to succeed.  Any language will do, whether it is a natural language, like Hebrew or Arabic, or a programming language, like FORTRAN or Python.   Either way, libraries, online or physical, are a key of help and hope for finding this information.  And as they succeeded then, so could we all succeed again, using adaptability, daring, and hope.

Hope for us all.

Action Item:

1.)  Check out a book on coding in any language from your Public Library,

2.)      …find the first “Hello World” page, and  try it out yourself, and then

3.)      …share it with a friend!

4.)  … or, just write a story about a strong lady who has to learn some new skill in order to adapt to difficult or dangerous circumstances?  🙂

Let’s #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail starting by improving these four parts of our good #PublicDomainInfrastructure:
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare , and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !


#PublicDomainInfrastructure #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19
ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

image: By Wikimedia – Wikimedia commons, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=55282489

Spanish Sundays, and Public Health Threats: Censurship… La Censura: Una Amenaza para la Salud Pública

English
Me quedo sorprendida de haber aprendido (a traves de mi programa favorito: El Ministerio del Tiempo) que La Gripe Española de 1918 en realidad no comenzô en España, sino era llamada Española por el hecho de que España era el primer paîs (o el unico) de haber permitido noticias de esa maladia cuando empezô.  Otros paîses censuraron la noticia debido a la Gran Guerra, y asi terminaron ayudando al virus de extenderse con el regreso de los soldados tras la guerra.   Una triste manera de aprender como la censura puede haber consequencias mortiferas en todo el mundo.

(Correcciônes a mi español recibidos con buen grado…)

a Leer, Escribir, Soñar, Enseñar!

ShiraDest
originally posted on the 27th of August, 12016 HE

Thoughtful Thursdays: learning a language to smile at others, or not?

Short story: glad I smiled at someone I did not know -who thanked me, and made me grateful to be alive, back in 2005. And even more recently.

Less short version of the story:
When I lived in Izmir, that summer I took long walks on Saturday afternoons. I had the habit of smiling, or at least nodding, to every person I saw because frankly, I hoped someone would smile or nod back at me. At least acknowledge me as a fellow human being, as I tried to do, even passing the homeless people lining the streets as you go into the Metro (in DC).

So, I nodded at a lady in passing, never met her, just kept going because I was too tired to say Gunaydin (Good Morning/afternoon in Turkish), and my Turkish was only rudimentary any way.
Then I heard a call behind me. I turned to see that woman walking back toward me, and her eyes were glistening.
She put her hand on my chest, nothing scary, nothing sexual, just an ordinary safe contact, and said, in very simple Turkish that was clear and slow, that in five years in Izmir, no one had ever greeted her. She thanked me, and I nodded in return, too moved to get out even one word of Turkish. We both turned and went our own ways. And now, over ten years later, I am glad that I smiled at a random person whom I had never met, and never saw again.
I hope that I can share that joy with …    Everyone.

Action Items:

1.)   Consider:  Do you, personally, greet, or don’t greet, people you do not know?  How did you feel about strangers greeting you?

2.)  How do you think this appears, from the other person’s point of view?

3.)  What do you think about the idea of greeting everyone, stranger or not, and why? 

Let’s #EndPoverty , #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail starting by improving these four key parts of our #PublicDomainInfrastructure:
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare , and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !

In Service to Human Community,
ShiraDest

scheduled in September, 12020 HE

Thoughtful Thursdays: learning, teaching, and adulthood?

Winning glory on today’s battlefield: The Modern Mind

Renault’s excellent book The Persian Boy shows the difficulty of learning, and of teaching. Both would probably be easier if our society understood what it takes to teach a person a useful and necessary skill from start to finish. Hence my proposal for a modern universal
Adult Rite of Passage.

   What we need our children to prove, upon recognition of adulthood, is not their prowess in battle or the hunt, not their virility, not their adeptness at social maneuvering, but their ability to contribute meaningfully to society by teaching another member of the community, from level 0, how to do something that is both difficult and absolutely necessary in our society today. By requiring our children to teach some other person, child or adult, a needed life skill, over the course of about a year, this pre-adult shows persistence, perseverance, discernment, and of course, the key skill in question. A useful side effect of this is also that it would effectively increase (dramatically) the number of available tutors, and also lead to every adult in our society coming away with an understanding of the challenges involved in teaching anyone anything non-trivial. Thus we provide an esteem building exercise and respect building accomplishment all in one go. We then reward that accomplishment with full adult status, whatever the age of the pre-adult in question. This obviously assumes that the pre-adult has had opportunity to prove his or her good judgement in other ways as well, prior to seeking said recognition. This might help as one step of a series of steps implemented by and through local communities which could lead to more long-term thinking in society at large, given a critical mass and good faith in the ability of human kind to rise above our instincts, and learn to cooperate. In other words (from Lenier in Bablylon 5): to be better than we are.

Action Items:

1.)   Think of how you, personally, showed that you were an adult: did you go through any sort of ritual, rite of passage, or testing period?  How did you feel about that process?

2.)  Do you know of others who went through rites of passage, and how did that seem, to you?  Did you get to see the process from the other person’s point of view?

3.)  What do you know of any currently used rites of passage (Bar/Bat Mitzvah, the cutting of the T-Shirt for soloing student pilots, etc)?

4.)  What do you think the above suggested Modern Adult Rite of Passage would accomplish for our society, and why? 

Let’s #EndPoverty , #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail starting by improving these four key parts of our #PublicDomainInfrastructure:
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare , and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !

In Service to Human Community,
ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

Moody Monday: Martin Luther King -Rabbinical Commentary poster inspired a Novel

This famous speech made by Dr. King, treated as a sacred text:

MLK3speechHillelCommentaryStudy

inspired me to write my first practice Novel.   Everyone should write an autobiography and/or a novel.   Mine, an autobiographical novel (Biblical Science Fiction…), RealDraft6Creator Friend or Foe Beginnings,  can be available, if anyone wants to see it.

Let’s #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail and support these four key parts of our #PublicDomainInfrastructure:
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !


#PublicDomainInfrastructure #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19
ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

High School in 5 months, Day 7, Lesson Plan, Arabian Nights and fractions, 12019 HE (Holocene Calendar)

Updated syllabus:  ShiraDJonesHSEsyllabus

(Today’s reading is from P. 279 in Peterson’s Master the HiSET,
2nd Edition…)

By 500 BCE, the Zapotec people were developing an advanced society in what is now the southern Mexican state of Oaxoca.  This civilization developed early forms of hieroglyphic writing adn a calendar system.  the Zapotec built complex cities and are considered the first city builders in the Americas.  the first true urban center in teh Americas was the  Zapotec city of Monte Alban…”

Where are the grammatical errors in this passage?

Day 7 Lesson Plan except for the Reading Passage (as a PDF file…): Monday, 11 February, 2019

Khan Academy Using modifiers: Adverbs vs. Adjectives Khan Academy fractions practice, Day 2 of 3
thursDay7exitSlips

Lesson Plan  Text, 6-9pm,  Monday, 11 February, 2019 HE rm. 211, SDCE, North City Campus
Instructor: Ms. S. D. Jones
In our Learning Toolbox: Different types of Journals
Bonus Question: Who gave us the numbers we use today, allowing us to do fractions?
Vocabulary:
copy into your notes, and MindMap each word (what is a Mind Map??):
Zapotec Part/portion/fraction of What Test-taking skills
500 BCE Balance (the equation) Do we aleady have?
Common multiple consecutive numbers
Common denominator Skim the test first
Synonym Like terms Do easy questions first
6pm: Spend two minutes imagining:
Write one or two sentences explaining how you think you can use a Math Journal to help
you learn mathematics.
6:02 Continue on work from your folder (on Reading/Literature/Science/Social Studies).
7pm: Stand up & Stretch!
(Tuesdays and Thursdays: If you want to hear a story, then imagine you are a young girl
living long ago, and what could motivate her to risk her life to save other people. (P.x, Tales
from the Arabian Nights, D. Jo Napoli, on loan via the gracious help of SDPL UTC branch staff
who went out of their way to help me find this book for my students…)
Why do you think the characters made the choices they did in this story?)
7:02-7:07 (Today’s reading is from P. 279 in Peterson’s Master the HiSET,
2nd Edition…)

By 500 BCE, the Zapotec people were developing an advanced society in what is now the southern Mexican state of Oaxoca.  This civilization developed early forms of hieroglyphic writing adn a calendar system.  the Zapotec built complex cities and are considered the first city builders in the Americas.  the first true urban center in teh Americas was the  Zapotec city of Monte Alban…”

Where are the grammatical errors in this passage?
Find videos and activities on Modifiers if you finish your work early:
GrammarBook.com and KhanAcademy.org
7:15 Continue with Language Arts work from folders until 7:45; Break if desired, from 7:30-7:45
7:45 Math review warm-up Question: What is a synonym for fraction?
1. part
2. portion
3. rational number
4. All of the above?
(Eliminate 3 choices!) Ask any math questions!!!
Work on your mathematics from folders…
8:20: Stand up & stretch, think about counting.
Please write one sentence explaining what fractions are, and why they are different from
whole numbers.
8:22 Mathematics: Fractions, part 2/3
If you wanted to what a fraction is, how would you do that?
What is a Rational Number?
What kind of numbers are we using to count by 5s?
How could we Mindmap the word Fraction? (draw a pizza? Why? Draw
“Integer Bar Integer? Why?
As an equation, is 2 plus 1/2 equal to ½ plus 2? Why?
How can we express the above equation arithmetically?
What if we added another number to both sides of the equation?
Why does adding the same number to both sides not change the equation?
How could we add ½ + ½?
“ “ “ ½ + 1/3? What must we do first? Why?
Do online LCD exercises
8:40 Exit Questions: 1. How can you use the word Fraction in a sentence?
2. How many years ago was 500 BCE?
3. What is an LCD?
4. What is an integer?
8:45 Turn in Exit Slip, Dismissal

Language Learning, enslaved family history, and in-kind reparations

“You will only be given tick marks to identify how many EPs were in each gender/age category. For these, also create unique records for each tick mark. Let’s say you are drawing information from the 1840 census, and there are two identified as Slaves/Male/10 & Under 24. You will create a Source Child to Enslaved Population named something like “1840 Census.” The two EPs will be added as children to 1840 Census with the given names:

Male #1 c1817-1830
Male #2 c1817-1830”

Wow: this is brilliant. Just as I’d given up hope on the argument for updating database fields on the site where I’ve been volunteering as Slavery sub-Project coordinator, I found the Beyond Kin Project (translating articles written in three languages is rewarding, especially when it provides practical help in finding enslaved persons from the Caribbean, but Last Name fields created for anglo names do not work for those of us tracing enslaved ancestors, nor for Latino families with two last names…). It helps. Really.

It is the breath of fresh air that I needed just when I’d begun to despair of arguments with the descendants of slave holders who did not want their names on the profiles of enslaved persons who had been held in bondage by their ancestors. Explaining that the vast majority of enslaved persons did not have their own last names, oddly, did not help. But apart from language barriers and social barriers, there was another hurdle: the records themselves. How do you find the name of a person listed only by description, or even as no more than just a tick mark on a ledger? Well, now, there may be a way.

The Beyond Kin Project method is a way of using documents naming or enumerating Enslaved Persons to keep the various bits of data in one place while gathering enough information to find and record the names and family groupings of former slaves and their families. This is data mostly in the possession of the descendants of slave holding families and institutions. Thus, the BKP method encourages descendants of slave holders to take the initiative, as one form of in-kind time-donation based reparations, of using the documents in their family archives to make it possible for those of us tracing our enslaved ancestors, once we get back beyond the usual 1870 Brick Wall.

The Beyond Kin project also offers all of us, whether related to slavery or not, a new hope. The hope that the children of slave owners and those of their slaves can work together, and the hope that those not involved in the history of slavery at all can also help, and that we can all heal together.

Yes, we can.

Beat the odds by learning a language? These ancient Literate Ladies did…

Ask Tamar, Ruth, and Scheherazade.
רֶגַע… Rega… Wait, you say:
Scheherazade is not in the Bible, she is from the Thousand and One Nights, originally in Arabic, or maybe partly in Persian, but certainly not in Hebrew;
This, you remember!

Ok, point taken, her book was not in Hebrew, but Arabic is a sister language.   More on this shortly…

Tamar was a Canaanite woman, and so had to learn Hebrew, or Judah’s dialect of Hebrew at the very least.
Ruth, a native of Moab, had to learn the Hebrew of the time of Naomi.
Scheherazade, at the palace, had to learn the hardest languages of all: the languages of heartbreak, of story, and of love.

So, you see, Scheherazade’s story is the same as that of her Biblical sisters: she was a clever woman faced with a survival situation in a man’s world. And she, like her sisters, had to learn a language in order to survive.

Each lady had to live by her wits in difficult times, and to use the tools available to her at that time. Nowadays, they would surely go together to the Public Library to learn to use the power of modern tools like computers and smartphones, especially using Unix to navigate this new world. And as they succeeded then, so would succeed again, using adaptability, daring, and hope.

Hope for us all.

Let’s #EndPoverty , #EndHomelessness ,& #EndMoneyBail starting by improving these four parts of our good #PublicDomainInfrastructure:
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare , and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !


#PublicDomainInfrastructure #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19
ShiraDest

April, 12020 HE

image: By Wikimedia – Wikimedia commons, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=55282489