Minbari Mondays, And Now For A Word: Defend

      This  week reports an incident from Saturday, September 16th, of our year 2259 CE, sent to us from our future by Ranger Mayann, stationed on  Minbar:

      Greetings, from Tuzanor:

      This day was recorded in the anals of the Anla’Shok as one of great anguish for all of us.  Even down the years, my order recalls the pain of humiliation of Ambassador Delenn, and the pain of seeing so many lives wasted so brutally.  She spoke for the innocents, even after being played for an innocent by a brutal Human.  Your reporter, deliberately made our ambassador look badly.  Yet, she arose and defended the Narn innocents being slaughtered with courage, and with honor.  And with the astuteness we see when she goes on to lead my order.  The Centauri were indeed on the path to committing war crimes, with their mass drivers, that day.  Yet, the voice of G’Kar went unheard.

To our shame.

      At the end of this terrible day, Delenn recovered, and reminded us all that you Humans have the great gift of building communities, and are responsible to use that gift.  Keep building your communities. 

We are all in need of you. 

 

Writing from Tuzanor, on Minbar

Earth year 2278,

Anla’Shok Mayann

     Shira’s addendum to Ranger Mayann’s report: 

     A word, or or a phrase, can bind us down the centuries.  Words like “Never Again.”   And also words like “a long line…”   That would be the line of our spiritual ancestors reminding us that duty comes in more than one form.  I think of this as “The Long Gray Line” episode.  That speech moves me to tears every time I read it. 

     Even if I now feel differently about much of Gen. Macarthur’s intent in that speech, it still never fails to stir awe at a man facing the twilight of his life, and looking forward to becoming part of that long line of those who admonish us to “make my life have meaning” in ways that do not involve the indiscriminate shedding of blood.  There is honor in defending the truth, defending those who, like this day’s Narn refugees, cannot defend themselves, and in defending peace.

     I still mourn the loss of those ideals in our society.  Already, in 1988 when I entered the US Naval Academy as a Midshipman 4th Class, it was clear that my classmates, upon commissioning in 1992, would hold very values different from those cadets of West Points addressed back in 1962, and not for the better.  That a soldier prays for peace, not a word in our time, when cadences were called glorifying brutality against “kids” and a plebe refusing to call those cadences could be punished, rather than complimented.  Nearly 40 years later, we see the shape of our new values, and I wonder how we can remember to defend the innocent, and to pray for peace, as the soldier described by the General does.

Both Neatnik  and The Junkyard  give more traditional plot and character perspectives of this episode. 

Last week’s review was of the season 2, episode 14: There All the Honor Lies,

Next week’s review will be (in Lurker’s Guide order) Knives

-Shira Destinie Jones

Shira

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.

I come in peace, I am your friend.

There are earlier episodes, as part of a letter on the history of the Babylon Project.  

Action Prompts:

1.)  Share your thoughts on how we Human Beings might start to build a more fully inclusive society for all of us, and how this episode of Babylon 5 could help that process.

2.) Write a book, story, post or tweet that uses these thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for COVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport

Read, Write

-we can learn from the past Stayed on Freedom’s Call for free,

        by Teaching and Learning (Lesson Plans offline) in the present, to

                                      help build a kinder future: Do Better: a Vision of a Better World

( 5 month GED lesson 17 of 67 plans),

   and  Babylon 5 review posts, from a Minbari Ranger’s perspective: story inspires learning

                                                                                                                                          and also even courage

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil, MAT, BSCS

the year, 2021 CE = year 12021 HE

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

Shira Destinie Jones’ work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.



20 thoughts on “Minbari Mondays, And Now For A Word: Defend

  1. “… values different from those cadets of West Points addressed back in 1962…”

    Indeed, we, of the Anla’Shok also face this problem with our brethren of the Minbari warrior caste. It is the chief reason that we train apart from them.

    We live for the One, we die for the One,

    Anla’Shok Mayann

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I think I might do that. It definitely turns on a part of military history that is ignored, except for times like my Plebe Summer, when plebes commit suicide due to parental pressures not to come home.

      Liked by 3 people

  2. “I still mourn the loss of those ideals in our society. Already, in 1988 when I entered the US Naval Academy as a Midshipman 4th Class, it was clear that my classmates, upon commissioning in 1992, would hold very values different from those cadets of West Points addressed back in 1962, and not for the better. That a soldier prays for peace, not a word in our time, when cadences were called glorifying brutality against “kids” and a plebe refusing to call those cadences could be punished, rather than complimented. Nearly 40 years later, we see the shape of our new values”

    Maybe this should have been a comment?

    Liked by 4 people

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