Tag Archives: governance

Wondering Wednesdays, Baby Acres, Chapter 1, part 1C: Governance & Tools

This post continues the rough draft of  Chapter 1 of my non-fiction WiP, Baby Acres.  This is the next outline section, chapter 1, section IC.

I am posting the 288 words, which was meant to be 250 words, for this section along with some more thoughts on the overall chapter outlining process for the book as a whole.

Yet again, as previously stated, the overall goal is now to explain why we need both equ. + justice, & why in 4 phases.  This chapter will transition to a chapter (2-5) for each phase, showing what Phases I-IV could look like as part of a possible roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us.  This vision is laid out in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met, without taking anything from anyone, and without violence, intimidation, nor coercion of any kind. 

Chapter One, section IC:

Phase III with respect to Phase I and to the entire project:

(section IB was last week…)

IC rough draft:

Phase III will build on phases I and II, which help prepare a physical and cultural climate in which Human Rgts and Equity both thrive, and create a virtuous feedback loop to drive further peaceful change.  The three principle goals of Phase III would be to implement a fully universal single payer system of health care, universal free education from pre-k to trade-craft or PhD, and a universal  basic income.  These goals would clearly require coordination across a wide variety of policy and geographic areas in order to prevent in-migration from lesser advantaged places before sufficient development has taken place at the global level.  This brings home the adage that “no one is free until all are free,” to paraphrase the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  If people in all parts of the world are assured of their safety and freedom from want, then greater development for all of, and contribution from all of us, becomes possible.  Many of the tools currently being used, like RCV/IRV, Participatory Budgeting, Citizens Juries, local complementary currencies, and even Cesare Emiliani’s proposed Holocene Era calendar, can help in building new policies and forms of governance based on equal Human Rights.  So can some old tools, like the New Deal era CCC, and the Peace Corps.  Updating old programs for new purposes and times can bring policy in line with good governance objectives while potentially avoiding some of the pitfalls involved in crafting brand new programs from scratch.  The scope of each program can be widened as needed to aid other regions and nations in developing similar benefits as should be visible during Phase III.  Such cooperation, becoming the norm, can lead the way to a relaxing of travel restrictions for many more people, and create pathways toward Phase IV.

— (Next section: Chapter 1, ID…)

I’m continuing to build my detailed section outlines, and then write each section, but I found Phase III much more difficult to outline, probably because I never really had a clear idea of what that stage was supposed to be.  

(JYP, this photo’s for you:)

ChptrI1CPhaseIII

Going back to my earlier posts was annoying, since they are scattered around, but helpful, since it made it obvious to me that essentially I was thinking of what many call “the Good Governance paradigm,” from my PhD days.  It finally hit me that that is what this middle phase is really about: building enough faith in each other and tools (like local complementary currencies) for working together, to get to the fourth and final stage.  For some reason, I found myself hearing (Lionel Richie?) the song The Children are our Future, just after imagining our infrastructure as a Village lifting up kids to Adulthood, which led me to how It takes a Village to Raise a Child, and The Children are Our future, and thus to today’s featured image.  🙂   I hope that that made sense, and that no one considers me too crazy, yet!

Oh, right, and I think I’ve finally figured out who my audience might be, or at least a couple of comps:  Walden Two meets The War on Poverty: A Civilian Perspective (by Dr.s Jean and Edgar Cahn, 1964).  I know that lots of people consider Skinner’s writing to be stilted, but I like the tilt of most reviewers, in that the idea is that a community should keep trying policies that members agree upon until they find what works for all of them.

As for genre, apart from the obvious Non-fiction, I’m not sure where this book falls.  System Change, Causes, someone even suggested Inspirational, but I doubt that one.

Last week was the ninth installment of this series…

 

Action Items:

1.) Consider some ideas you may have on how having really good shared infrastructure and tools could help society move forward in 30 to 45 years,

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please, and

3.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking at LEAST for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button: Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC,

Vote, Teach and Learn (PDF Lesson Plan Book)

and
my Babylon 5 review posts, if you like Science Fiction,
and
a proposed Vision on Wondering Wednesdays: for a kinder world…
   

Shira Destinie A. Jones, MPhil

our year 2020 CE =  12020 HE

(Day 1Day 5)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free copies at: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Please leave a review, if you can, on the GoodReads page.

Minbari Mondays, The War Prayer, and Empathy for the Other

This is the continuation of our fictional letter (reviewing each film and episode of Babylon 5) that I receive each week from Ranger Mayann.

Here is her 9th report:

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa, Greetings from Tuzanor:

In this report, in your Earth year 2258, it is the second year of operation of the station. This station which has so much of the love of my people, even when we were not loved there.

This report revolves around two intertwined incidents, both of which relate to the other, and to the need for empathy among all sentient species. You humans, just as we Minbari, continue to learn this lesson.

 

While one of our revered poets was on the station to visit with her old friend, Delenn, since before she was either Satai or ambassador, a terrible series of crimes was committed. The crimes affected not only the person of our Poet, but also the sense of safety, or lack thereof, for all of the vulnerable aboard the station. Even vulnerable humans, despite the attacks being carried out by human beings.

Attacks of hatred always carry a double message: one for those who were directly targeted, and one for those who were not directly targeted, but as members of the “in” group are also being reminded to “stay in line,” as you Humans put it.

Our Ambassador Delenn, and her friend, our well-known Minbari poet, were brought into closer contact with Ambassador Mollari. This series of incidents helped set Mollari, I humbly assert, on his path to possible redemption, as our Poet showed him a needed insight.

From the city of  Tuzanor, on Minbar

Earth year 2278,

Anla’Shok Mayann

  Addendum to Ranger Mayann’s report, by Shira:  This episode is one of my favorite episodes!

I think of this as the tight shoes episode!

We get to see love and hate up close and personal, and a beautiful opening, with two friends discussing the maturing of a poem begun long ago. Garibaldi makes a still valid and saddening point about the hateful attacker, as he grunts that there are

too many who agree with them, and too many more just don’t give a damn.”

I love the conversation between Mollari and the Minbari poet, where he snaps that

I would expect such logic from a poet,”

and she comes back with a beautiful reminder that

all sentient beings are best defined by their capacity and need for love.

This episode has an excellent juxtaposition of love and hatred, with the consequences of both linked through an inter-generational exploration of an existence without love. That would be the existence of ambassador Londo Mollari.

This episode also shows the importance of the role of love and visits to the sick by their loved ones in healthcare.

That would be the empathy part of healthcare.

 

That was part of Ranger Mayann’s letter on the history of the Babylon Project.  It can be seen from another point of view by watching the Babylon 5 Season 1, Episode 7: The War Prayer, which I most highly recommend.

See Ranger Mayann’s eighth report, from last week.

-Shira

Action Items:

1.)  Share your thoughts on hate crimes, bullying, and cultural dominance, if you will.

2.) Share your thoughts on how we Human Beings might start to build a more fully inclusive society for all of us, and how this episode of Babylon 5 could help that process.

3.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses these thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
ReadWrite -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button:

, Vote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans offline, but no links…)

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The previous lesson 67/67 , and the most recent lesson 1/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Wondering Wednesdays, Baby Acres, and Human Rights as Equity

This post  goes on to begin the rough draft of my current non-fiction WiP, Baby Acres: A possible Vision for Making Society Suck Less, in 60 Years.   (Thanks, once again, to JYP and Tammy for the title ideas!!)  The overall goal has been to lay out a roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us, so, I am turning, this week, to the introductory chapter, Chapter 0, of the book, in the hope that All HumanKind  will eventually have each person’s basic needs  met.  This book lays out one possible path for getting to that point.

Introduction: Empathy-building as an ongoing part of all
4 Phases


Having cited some of the reasoning which led up to the inception of this project, we now delve into the foundational concepts behind each phase. Empathy-building, through various means, is a continual part of each phase, as without empathy, no society can be just or safe or kind.

This vision of one potential just society is based on the ideas that such a society must be defined by its levels of both empathy and of full respect for the Human Rights of every living person. Such rights as the right to equity, the right to help create peaceful change, and to have each of those four freedoms that President FDR spoke about, embody the essence of a just society. But that essence still requires some tangible way to measure the level of justice, change institutions and systems that need changing, and to define specific ideals upon which those justice seeking institutions build, and to what particular ends.


Human Rights must be the starting point for any society which seeks to be a just society.  The application of named rights for each human being in an equitable manner is essential for a
society to be truly just. Some way to measure that application is also necessary. John Rawls proposed a test for determining whether a given society could be considered just, via a thought experiment. While that test will neither be debated nor explained in full here, further exploration of his writings will show that his proposal involved imagining oneself, after having designed a just society, as being given the choice to become part of that society, but without any knowledge of the position in which one, personally, would enter it. Rawls suggested that if a person would not be willing to enter a given society with no knowledge, or under a thick veil of ignorance, as to what that person’s position would be in the society, then that society might not be a just society. For example, no reasonable person, not knowing what position he or she might have, would consent to become part of US society, because if the position of that person turns out to be one of a homeless person, then the lived experience of the vast majority of people who experience homelessness would indicate that entering society in that position would very nearly doom one’s chances in life. Thus, Rawls’ test would show that the current state of American society is not that of a just society. As many have pointed out. Like Noam Chomsky.


Chomsky and others have written many books and articles detailing a variety of critiques of US and other current societies, in terms of the damage that governments of the United States and other developed nations allow to be done in the name of economic competition. A just society must be just for its own citizens, and must also promote the ideals upon which it is founded in its dealings with other societies. On that basis, Chomsky finds that US treatment of other nations is especially unjust, and that injustice is a reflection of treatment withing US society of the most vulnerable communities within US society, as well, such as Black Americans, refugees, and women of all races. So, the treatment of citizens within a just society must also be mirrored by how that society treats those outside of its boundaries with whom it has dealings, as Chomsky points out on page 83 of his book Profits over People: unfairly vilifying and then crushing a nation for the sake of economic competition is unjust not only to those outside of a society, but even to those within the ‘winning’ society, as the reality of such behavior is evident even to small children, when viewed without the coloring of propaganda. The effects within US society, for example, of the embargo against Cuba over the long term, have been to harden views in some quarters against any compromise or opening of discussion on the topic, while others in American society have come to see hard-liners insistent on the embargo as both anti-Cuban and even anti-immigration. Thus, unfair treatment of outsiders by members of even a just society affects all members within that society, causing divisions and even justifying mistreatment of dissenting opinions, rendering that formerly just society unjust in the act. This shows that even a just society would have to have ways of interacting with other societies that set boundaries and spell out ideals to which all connected societies could aspire.


Eleanor Roosevelt, in helping to redact the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human
Rights, drew heavily on the concept enshrined in the US Declaration of Independence “that all
men are created equal… that they are endowed with certain inalienable rights…” which include the right to be treated with equal dignity to that of every other human being, regardless of momentary state of being, such as poverty or wealth, gender, religion or lack thereof, etc. As crucial as to whom these rights apply, the document defined an international standard of what rights should be considered as basic to all human beings. The right not to be tortured is, for example, a basic human right which applies to each and every human being at all times and under all circumstances. Likewise with “the right to life, liberty, and security of person.”
Certain rights, such as that negating slavery, which is in direct contradiction to the 13th
Amendment to the US federal Constitution, were visionary in their global scope, considering that many nations had not yet completed the rebuilding from the destruction of the second world war, and even that of the first, the Great War. The UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights is thus a fitting starting point for our definition of what, in terms of tangible rights, a just society ought to look like. The definition of those rights does not, in itself, show us all of what a just society looks like, but it is a start, beginning at where we are today, from a documentary and international legal point of view. It shows that to build a truly just society, we do not really have that far to go. With a set of basic human right in place to which everyone around the world has agreed, in principle, we can move on to look at ways in which those rights could potentially be implemented in a way that would be equitable for all human beings on the planet. Given that the current global systems of finance, trade, etc, are clearly highly inequitable, a just society must therefore have mechanisms in place to allow the peaceful changing of the systems of governance, and even of government, allowing citizens within the society to change parts of the system of governing that show themselves to be unjust. Such peaceful revolution, though, revolves around several connected but distinct types of justice, and depends upon the ability of all citizens to make their voices heard in absolutely non-violent, non-threatening, and non- aggressive manners, so that all citizens can feel both heard, and protected.

That is the rough draft of the first part of my introductory chapter. 

Last week was the second installment of this series…

Action Items:

1.) Search for two different sources related to visions for a better world.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how good governance (or bad) can affect a society that might be built, in 50-100 years.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button:

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The previous lesson 51/67 , and the most recent lesson 52/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Minbari Mondays, Mind War, and Gatekeepers with Empathy?

This is the continuation of our fictional letter (reviewing each film and episode of Babylon 5) that I receive each week from Ranger Mayann.

Here is her eighth report:

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa, Greetings from Tuzanor:

In this very minimal eighth report, still in your Earth year 2258, the second year of operation of the station, there were two unrelated incidents which both came near to affecting the life of then Commander Sinclair. One, so we hear, is rumored to have almost cost him his life, as well as those of the quarter million other inhabitants of that station. The other appears to have involved Sinclair’s human mate, Miss Sakai, in an apparently simultaneous life threatening event. As the Anla’Shok lacks reports on either of the incidents in question, I can only confirm that no high ranking Minbari, and no Anla’Shok, were aboard the station during the time of these events.

From the city of  Tuzanor, on Minbar,

Earth year 2278,

Anla’Shok Mayann

  Addendum to Ranger Mayann’s report, by Shira:  This episode is all about control.  It introduces Bester, appropriately enough, and also, the soon to be infamous Jack. We also learn more about the PsyCorps, but it’s still one of my least favorite episodes, and I cringe every time I hear a certain word mispronounced during what ought to be a very tender scene. On the other hand, we do get another great Ivanova quote:

“Who watches the Watchmen?”

and an even better one:

“Good old PsyCorps! All the moral fiber of Jack the Ripper.”

We also get introduced to Garibaldi’s not so pleasant relationship with Al Bester:

“Anatomically impossible, Mr. Garibaldi, but…”

The really neat thing about this episode, from the Narn point of view, is how G’kar manages to take his role of gatekeeper for Sigma 957 and turn it on its head. He is a watcher of the planet, effectively, but actually uses his power to keep Miss Sakai safe. The PsyCorps, on the other hand, are the watchers and keepers of human telepaths, but not for the rest of us normal human beings, or mundanes, as the Teeps like to call us.  Garibaldi seems to feel the same way Ivanova feels about telepaths, saying “they look at you like you were some kind of bug.”  So this episode is all about control, watchers, and who gets to be the GateKeeper of what, and why, but not always in a bad way. And I do appreciate how the “Becoming” image of the guest star looks like something from an Octavia Butler novel.  Too bad Octavia Butler didn’t get any credits in the episode though.

And there is one other part of this episode that I really do like, which, along with Sakai doing a great mocking imitation of G’kar’s warning that “Sigma 957 is not a healthy place,” just before she realizes that she’s about to cook, shows G’kar starting to reach up toward his potential. Fortunately for Miss Sakai, and by extension, Commander Sinclair, some gatekeepers don’t like others to die embarrassed. Upon thanking him for her rescue, Sakai asks G’Kar what was that huge thing that knocked her into the planetary orbit and nearly cooked her. I love his explanation and I can always imagine the two ants, one looking up and asking the other

“What was that?”

And the other replying:

“You don’t need to know!”

 

That was part 8 of Ranger Mayann’s letter on the history of the Babylon Project.  It can be seen from another point of view by watching the Babylon 5 Season 1, Episode 6: Mind War, which I definitely recommend.

See Ranger Mayann’s seventh report, from last week.

-Shira

Action Items:

1.)  Share your thoughts on gatekeepers and who gets input into setting agendas and watching over those agendas and the people placed in the way, if you will.

2.) Share your thoughts on how we Human Beings might start to build a more fully inclusive society for all of us, and how this episode of Babylon 5 could help that process.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses these thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
ReadWrite -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button:

, Vote, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The previous lesson 67/67 , and the most recent lesson 1/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…


Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Wondering Wednesdays, Baby Acres, and Governance Concerns

This post continues to expand on my current non-fiction WiP, Baby Acres: A possible Vision for Making Society Suck Less, in 60 Years.   (Thanks, again, to JYP and Tammy for the title ideas!!)  The overall goal still being to lay out a roadmap for a fully inclusive society for all of us, I am turning, this week, to Phase III.  Just a short overview, mind you, to explain what my thoughts are as I start to work on fleshing the whole idea out for the book.  I realized that any society that could  pass the Rawlsian Veil of Ignorance Test would still be connected to societies that might not pass that test, which would be a problem for that just, or even merely less unsafe, society.  A serious problem.

That meant that All HumanKind  would have to be included in both Phases III and IV, since otherwise, large waves of economic migration would be generated from unsafe places, toward any society where security and basic needs were met.  Kind of like now, with the waves of refugees fleeing the on-going wars in various parts of the world toward Europe and the US.

If you follow my blog regularly, you know of a hash tag #publicdomaininfrastructure.  That tag encompasses four basic parts of our social infrastructure system which I think could give the most ‘bang for the buck’ if we devoted more support to them: Public Libraries, Public Health Care, Public Education (for both kids and adults), and Public Transportation.   With those areas shored up, our society then has the foundation for more participatory and inclusive governance structures, that can also scale up to fit in other parts of the world, as those areas levels of development increase, a bit like accession to the European Union.

Phases I and II develop the key basic stepping stones for a just society, building on empathy and critical thinking skills, the four key Public Domain Infrastructure systems, and an educated public able and willing to protect and teach themselves and others how to stay safe emotionally, physically, financially, and intellectually.  That means having systems that support those needs, like health care, libraries, well-rounded educational systems for all ages, and solid mass transit.  We must start by building those foundations in our own country, but they are also sorely needed in every country around the world, as attested to by many NGOs and UN agencies.  And it is with those international bodies that we can work to ensure that those basic health, information access, education and transportation needs are met for all people of the world.

In Phase III, both here and in other parts of the world as they are interested and able, ideas like Participatory Budgeting, Citizens Juries, Ranked Choice Voting or IRV, and local complementary currencies to supplement existing national monetary supplies can be tried and adjusted or abandoned depending on the needs of the community in question.  All of these tools are part of including a wider array of people in the decision-making processes that determine how resources are allocated among people in a given locality.  These tools each depend, however, on understanding the importance of cooperation and acting in good faith toward ones fellow citizens and residents.

So, Phase III would require an expanded world view, and a population ready to reach out to others, to learn new languages, to see through the lenses of other people’s experiences.   Thus, phases I and II are intended to build the necessary empathy, foundational bases for understanding, and then the values and skills for protecting others that could then allow such growth.

“And so, it” began, last week..

Action Items:

1.) Search for two different sources related to Good Governance.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how good governance (or bad) can affect a society that might be built, in 50-100 years.

4.) Write a story, post or tweet that uses those sources and your thoughts.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind?

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GoodReads button:

Nih sakh sh’lekk, sleem wa.   Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

ShiraDest

March, 2021 CE = March 12021 HE

(The previous lesson 67/67 , and the most recent lesson 1/67…)

Stayed on Freedom’s Call
(free: https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…)
includes two ‘imagination-rich’ walking tours, with songs, of Washington, DC. New interviews and research are woven into stories of old struggles shared by both the Jewish and African-American communities in the capital city.

Shared histories are explored from a new perspective of cultural parallels and parallel institution-building which brought the two communities together culturally and historically.

Free copies are available at https://archive.org/details/StayedOnF…

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Las Monedas Sociales y la Gobernanza; Community Currencies and Good Governance

Click here for English (while I look for the article I published about my Academic Articles published some years ago)…

“¿Ahora somos soberanos o rendimos pleitesía?

Sí, al Banco Central Europeo.”

Este era un comienzo para mi nueva forma de escribir, lo que yo esperàba  seguir mostrando como la Politiqua Publica y los Artes van juntos para el bien de todos, sobre todo cuando apoyado por las Monedas Sociales para empezar cooperativas de trabajadores (como han hecho en Ithaca, en el estado de Nueva York).  Pero estoy pensando en la razones de mi apoyo por las monedas sociales, despues de diez años trabajando en el tema.

En lo que toca a la transparencia, la responsibilidad y la participaciôn en la toma de decisiones sobre la emisiôn del dinero, las monedas sociales ganan el concurso.  Pero, también se puede emitir el dinero de manera mas democratica, y eso pondra fin a esos problemas.  Sobre todo si emitîamos màs dinero en lugares donde se hace falta, las ciudades, por ejemplo.  Una politica de dar el dinero sin costo alguno a las pequeñas emprezas darà recursos para las communidades locales sin necesidad de emitir una moneda local.  Pero, acaso una moneda local la hace mas facil tener una Renta Basica Universal?  Por que me parece, dado lo que ya hemos dicho en respeto a las cooperativas, que el dinero nacional es igual o mejor que la moneda social. Sin embargo, viendo de nuevo mis ensayos de los discursos que he dado, me acuerdo del bien que hace Las Monedas Sociales para la gente en agregando al dinero national, asi que por favor, siguen emitiendo las Monedas Sociales!!

“Are we rulers or do we pay tribute now?

Yes, to the European Central Bank”

This was a template for my new format of posting, which was meant to continue to show how Public Policy and the Arts work together for our common good, particularly when encouraged via complimentary local currencies used to incubate local workers cooperatives (as in Ithaca, NY).  But I am considering my reasons for having supported Local Currencies for the past ten years.

For transparency, accountability and participation in the decisions around issuing money, local currencies win, hands-down.  But, money can be issued more democratically, and that would end those particular problems.  Especially if we issued more money into areas where it was most needed, like inner cities.  A policy of grants for small businesses would provide resources for local communities without needing to issue a local currency.  But would a local currency make it easier to have a Universal Basic Income?  Apparently, with respect to cooperatives, national currencies are as good as or better than Local Currencies, given the above criteria are met. But, looking back at both of my talk hand-outs below, I remember the good for local people that local currencies can do as a complement to national money, and so please, continue issuing those Local Complementary Currencies!!

Action Items:

1.)    Just look up Time Banks available in your area.  (Try TimeBanksUSA…)

2.)     Try joining one, if you like.

3.)      Look up times and locations for your local Time Bank Board meetings.

4.)       Ask your local law-makers to accept part of the local taxes in Time Bank or local currency, if one is strong enough (like Ithaca Hours…).

Quotes for an earlier important debt-related post came from a recent ProPublica article co-published with The New Yorker.

Let’s #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness, & #EndMoneyBail and support these four key parts of our #PublicDomainInfrastructure:
1. #libraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !


#PublicDomainInfrastructure #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19
ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

originally published (with mild updates): Read, Write, Dream, Walk !
ShiraDest

February 8th, 12018 HE

– Las Monedas Sociales y las Cooperativas; Community Currencies and Cooperatives

Click here for English…

“¿Ahora somos soberanos o rendimos pleitesía?

Sí, al Banco Central Europeo.”

Este es un comienzo para mi nueva forma de escribir, lo que voy a seguir mostrando como la Politiqua Publica y los Artes van juntos para el bien de todos, sobre todo cuando apoyado por las Monedas Sociales para empezar cooperativas de trabajadores (como han hecho en Ithaca, en el estado de Nueva York).  Pero estoy pensando en la razones de mi apoyo por las monedas sociales, despues de diez años trabajando en el tema.

En lo que toca a la transparencia, la responsibilidad y la participaciôn en la toma de decisiones sobre la emisiôn del dinero, las monedas sociales ganan el concurso.  Pero, también se puede emitir el dinero de manera mas democratica, y eso pondra fin a esos problemas.  Sobre todo si emitîamos màs dinero en lugares donde se hace falta, las ciudades, por ejemplo.  Una politica de dar el dinero sin costo alguno a las pequeñas emprezas darà recursos para las communidades locales sin necesidad de emitir una moneda local.  Pero, acaso una moneda local la hace mas facil tener una Renta Basica Universal?  Por que me parece, dado lo que ya hemos dicho en respeto a las cooperativas, que el dinero nacional es igual o mejor que la moneda social. Sin embargo, viendo de nuevo mis ensayos de los discursos que he dado, me acuerdo del bien que hace Las Monedas Sociales para la gente en agregando al dinero national, asi que por favor, siguen emitiendo las Monedas Sociales!!

“Are we rulers or do we pay tribute now?

Yes, to the European Central Bank”

This is a template for my new format of posting, which will continue to show how Public Policy and the Arts work together for our common good, particularly when encouraged via complimentary local currencies used to incubate local workers cooperatives (as in Ithaca, NY).  But I am considering my reasons for having supported Local Currencies for the past ten years.

For transparency, accountability and participation in the decisions around issuing money, local currencies win, hands-down.  But, money can be issued more democratically, and that would end those particular problems.  Especially if we issued more money into areas where it was most needed, like inner cities.  A policy of grants for small businesses would provide resources for local communities without needing to issue a local currency.  But would a local currency make it easier to have a Universal Basic Income?  Apparently, with respect to cooperatives, national currencies are as good as or better than Local Currencies, given the above criteria are met. But, looking back at both of my talk hand-outs below, I remember the good for local people that local currencies can do as a complement to national money, and so please, continue issuing those Local Complementary Currencies!!

Read, Write, Dream, Walk !
ShiraDest

February 8th, 12018 HE