Day 21 of High School in Five Months, Growing your Brain, and Adulting Education

Learning new things, at any age, is crucial to our growth as human beings and as citizens of any democracy:

Let’s redefine Adulting to include learning for life, for citizenship, and for democracy!

Day 21 Lesson Plan
today, the Reading is via Closed Captions: “Just a Bill”
Math Warm-up: Area and estimation on Khan Academy
Practice Multiplying Powers: the Product Rule
Practice Dividing Powers: the Quotient Rule

Day 21 ExitSlips

Action Items:

1.) Find three different sources describing the ways our brain can grow (four, if you use the source cited in today’s lesson plan…),

2.) Share your  findings with us, and

3.) Write a book, story, blog post or tweet that uses those findings, and then, please tell us about it! If you write a book, once it is published please consider donating a copy to your local public library.

Dear Readers, ideas on learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning, on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write -one can add Stayed on Freedom’s Call via this GR button:

Yassas,   γεια σας!    

ShiraDest

December, 2020 CE = December 12020 HE

(Day 20Day 22)

Creative Commons License
Shira Destinie Jones by ShiraDest is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

42 thoughts on “Day 21 of High School in Five Months, Growing your Brain, and Adulting Education

        1. Well, it can be made to work that way, but it’s not quite the same thing. Edgar Kahn thought of the initial idea while in the hospital after a heart attack, and that idea still works best, I think: inter-generational mutual aid among many parties, but the reason that Time Dollars are not taxable is that the value is never tied to the market value of an item or service (which is what makes Time Banking less flexible, but a good first step on the way to scrip currencies, like Ithaca Hours, or Potomacs…).

          Liked by 2 people

        2. The fast is to commemorate the beginning of the first siege and the subsequent destruction of the first Beit haMikdash and the Babylonian exile. Historically, it was the only siege that completely sealed the city, much like the Covid lockdown. The Talmud explains that it was a warning for people to stop their squabbling and learn to live peacefully in isolation. They didn’t heed the warning; the squabbling grew into hatred between different fractions, and the second Beit haMikdash was destroyed because of Sinat Hinum. The Erev Shabbat fast is to remind us of that, and to give us hope, because it ends before Shabbat.
          Much love,
          D

          Liked by 1 person

        3. I think that looking at the wider context can help us to have that hope needed to come up out of our narrow places. That movement, as you know, requires learning, and it requires the imagination to believe that this hope of making a world possible where it will be better for all of us actually has meaning: in other words, that it is even in fact safe to hope at all. Only then do some of us rise up from those dark narrow places, facing the rising sun of a new day begun, for meaningfulness, and then perhaps, for contentment.

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    1. Thank you for this interesting question!
      Both, actually.
      New neural pathways are laid down as one practices learning or doing new things, thus growing the brain, physically (not in mass or weight, perhaps: I’ve not dug that much on the neural research), but the brain does actually ‘grow’ physically as well.
      But,
      I personally mean that our minds grow, or our ways of seeing the world, and our perspectives, as well as our abilities to solve problems, see other perspectives, feel for other people, etc.
      Warmest regards,
      Shira

      Liked by 2 people

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