Sacred Study Saturdays

Since I foolishly agreed to read the 6th reading for this week, that is Genesis 10:15-20, I’m going to concentrate on just that bit for this week, and probably drop off in my posting of my Torah study until after December, when I expect to have my Rough Draft done for my WiP.

Yassas,   γεια σας!    Salût !  Nos vemos!  Görüşürüz!     ! שָׁלוֹם

Action Items in support of literacy and language learning that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different sources to translate the word “book” into Hebrew.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how you like each of the sources you found,  perhaps as an update on your GoodReads reading,

4.) Write a blog post or tweet that uses a Hebrew word, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Dear Readers, any additional ideas toward learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning as part of on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write

Stayed on Freedom's Call: Cooperation Between Jewish And African-American Communities In Washington, DC, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!, Teach and Learn (Lesson Plans)!

ShiraDest

Preptober for NaNoWriMo 2020 CE

October, 2020 CE = 12020 HE

(The previous lesson plan since this post, and the most recent lesson plan…)

16 thoughts on “Sacred Study Saturdays

    1. Yup! I commented once that being a Star Trek fan helps, as hearing Klingon (and I had a friend or two who SPOKE Klingon, claiming that there are more Klingon speakers than Esperanto speakerss?!) actually helped me prepare for my leyning! 🙂
      Shavuah Tov, and thanks for reading, your good wishes (I guess we can’t say Break a Leg, can we?), and your knowledge 🙂
      Shira

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Fascinating. I speak neither Klingon, nor Esperanto (nor Hebrew, really) so I rely on sheer memorization to prepare for Torah readings. I’ve been told that actually learning Hebrew grammar would save me a lot of late nights of cramming. But as my congregations is not yet meeting in person and we’re reading out of the Chumash, I have been getting more sleep. Silver linings, I suppose.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. 🙂
          Yup, learning dikduk helps alot, as does the vocab, which is primary, for me: knowing the shoresh is where I start, then building from there. Folks will also like your reading better when you understand all the nuances of what you are reading, as it comes through in your tone (just as in English), and it is fun! I had a father bring his little daughter, also named Shira, to me one morning after service to ask why I’d dropped down to a whisper for a particular word (the Tamar & Judah story), and after I explained my reasoning, he squatted down to tell his daughter that in Judaism, we may not like everything we have to read or do, but we can always find some sort of a way to argue with it as we do it! 🙂 (Na’aseh ve Nishmah!!)
          🙂
          Silver linings, as you say! 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

        2. True. I’ve seen this on Purim when the awesome megillah readers will know the text so well they can use different character voices and still keep the trope. It’s fun to watch! I don’t even know megillah trope though so I’m not there yet!

          Liked by 1 person

        3. 🙂
          Yup, one of the reasons I love reading Chapter 7 on Purim, especially if I can get a kid to hold a Stop sign (as is custom at a shul back in DC) for the noise-makers! 🙂

          And don’t feel bad: I don’t know the Haftarah Trope, so I had to turn down a reading request, to everyone’s general shock (I guess Bar/Bat Mitzvah kids so often even skip the Torah Reading in favor of the Haftarah that everyone assumes we all know it, but I never had a Bat Mitzvah).

          Liked by 2 people

        4. Were you raised Orthodox? Honestly, many of the non-Orthodox people that I know forgot what they learned for their Bar/Bat Mitzvah not long after (one of several issues with non-Orthodox Hebrew School education, but that is a blog post in itself). So having a Bat Mitzvah is not the most reliable way to learn Haftarah trope, perhaps!

          Liked by 1 person

    1. Did: I’ve been away for some years now: I attended and leyned at both TI (16th st), and Adas Israel (mostly in the Trad. Egal. Minyan, but also at regular services once in a while).
      I also leyned in the am minyan at Ohr Kodesh, just on Silver Spring side.

      Like

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