Spanish Saturdays and books on slavery then, and family now

Since I’ve been a bit lacking on my reading of Don Quixote, I’m going to refer back to a book I read a while ago, that has become more timely again. It was written mostly in Spanish, but had so many sections written in French, with the odd section also in English, that I was glad to be fully trilingual.  (Clearly, speaking three languages in the same lang. family do not build sufficient empathy to prevent chattel slavery, so my hypothesis on empathy may not hold water, but I still hold out hope!)    I’m not sure if there were translations in the footnotes, or if the refs were to other notations, but either way, this work was both thorough and exhausting to read.  Also, very, very saddening.

My most pertinent notes:

0.91% “està enlinea junto con el articulo pdf de Santana-Portillo-Lopez…\n Shira\n 25.11.12015 12015 HE

page 33
 

7.52% “P.33 Las Ordenanzas No Fueron Cumplidas…

The Orders (to protect the Native population) were Not Obeyed…

protested as: “Como si los indios fuesen africanos!”

shows how little Africans were thought of…

January 7, 2016 –

 

page 135
 

30.75%“Manzilla: los esclavos españoles tuvieron derecho de casarse, y entonces tuvieron nombres de familia propios.\n (Spanish slaves could marry, thus had their own family names).\n 7.1.12016 EH”

 
January 12, 2016 –

 

page 167
 

38.04% “la Iglesia -en contra del costumbre en EEUU…\n the Church, contrari to costume in USA…”

 

My 5xs gr grandfather Miles Manzilla was purchased from Caroline Co, VA during the colonial period, with his own surname at the time, which was quite unusual.  It’s possible that he was from a Caribbean setting originally, or was sold through Spanish hands.

Note that the fact that the Roman Catholic Church respected the sacrament of marriage for slaves made a difference (or should have) in the largest slave sale known: the #GU272, the sale of 314 Jesuit owned enslaved people from southern MD to Louisiana, in 1838.   The Enslaved Persons with spouses off of the four Jesuit plantations involved in the sale were not supposed to be sold south, by order of senior Jesuits in Rome.  Unfortunately, we know that none of those orders were obeyed, either.  More information on that if anyone is interested.

So,  I hope to be back on track with Don Miguel de Cervantes next week, friends:

 

Action Items in support of literacy and hope that you can take right now:

1.) Search for two different resources to translate the word “Hello” into Spanish.

2.) Share them with us in the comments, here, please.

3.) Share your thoughts on how you like each of the resources you found,  perhaps as an update on your GoodReads reading,

4.) Write a blog post or tweet that uses a Spanish word, tells a good story, and makes a difference. I’m working on that through my historical fantasy #WiP, #WhoByFireIWill. Once published, donate one or more copies to your local public library, as I intend to do.

Dear Readers, any additional ideas toward learning, especially multiple #LanguageLearning as part of on-going education and empathy-building, to #EndPoverty, #EndHomelessness,  #EndMoneyBail & achieve freedom for All HumanKind? 

Support our key #PublicDomainInfrastructure  & #StopSmoking for CCOVID-19:
1. #PublicLibraries,
2. #ProBono legal aid and Education,
3. #UniversalHealthCare, and
4. good #publictransport
Read, Write, Ranked Choice Voting and Housing for ALL!!!!, Walk !

ShiraDest

September, 12020 HE

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