Back in my home town, with Fresh Eyes

Well, I am back where I got started, but seeing people and places and events with far different eyes, and having a very different experience -different from what I have had previously, and different from what I was expecting, even as I landed here.  Maybe it is good to use the lessons learned and perspectives gained, even when it was hard going.  Maybe we really can change for the better.  The evidence seems to point upward for me, now.

And you, friends?

Read, Write, Dream, Teach !

ShiraDest
16th of April, 2016

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Back in my home town, with Fresh Eyes

        1. When I was growing up, this place seemed entirely hopeless, given what my neighbors and family and I faced, so all I could imagine was to get away. Now that I have the emotional tools to cope, I see that I may very well be able to make a difference in the lives of people whose experiences are not very different from mine, and that seems to be making a huge difference for me. I was trying to make a difference earlier, but with so much anger that I was blind to hope. Yes, many of us were evicted as kids, but we can still help others, and we can even be kind to ourselves sometimes.

          Like

  1. 3 months on, to the day, since I’ve re-arrived, and I see why I left, and why I could stay. The arguments weigh nearly the same on both sides of the balance, though, in terms of basic physical survival needs. Emotional, another story…
    Thank you all for your comments. I appreciate your time and your perspectives. One thing no one mentioned, elsewhere when I asked why people liked DC, was a sense of warmth: when I was very small, early 70’s with Grandma Marie at Regency House every summer (Conn. & Nebraska Ave, NW), everyone said hi, and likewise on Tuckerman st, NW in 1987-88. That sense of warmth seems lacking now, except in Ivy City when I pass older neighbors sitting out front. That warmth is what I crave, but fear DC is entirly losing in the cultural change driven by Gentrification. I still insist on greeting every person I pass, even if no more than a nod of the head (yes, even after being spat toward once). I wonder if DC can be a place where we all greet each other as human beings, even with nothing more than a simple nod?

    Like

    1. Thank you all for your comments. I appreciate your time and your perspectives. One thing no one mentioned was a sense of warmth: when I was very small, early 70’s with Grandma Marie at Regency House every summer (Conn. & Nebraska Ave, NW), everyone said hi, and likewise on Tuckerman st, NW in 1987-88. That sense of warmth seems lacking now, except in Ivy City when I pass older neighbors sitting out front. That warmth is what I crave, but fear DC is entirly losing in the cultural change driven by Gentrification. I still insist on greeting every person I pass, even if no more than a nod of the head (yes, even after being spat toward once). I wonder if DC can be a place where we all greet each other as human beings, even with nothing more than a simple nod?

      Like

Please Share your Thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s